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The fugitive American woman Anne Sacoolas who is wanted about the death of Harry Dunn was a CIA spy

The American woman accused of killing Harry Dunn was a CIA agent, The Mail can reveal on Sunday.

The fugitive mother of three Anne Sacoolas, who had fled Britain after she crashed into the teen’s motorcycle outside an airbase last August, is considered a senior spy.

British ministers and officials are aware of Mrs. Sacoolas’ career in espionage, but she was not declared an agent when she came to the UK alongside her husband of the intelligence officer, Jonathan.

The fugitive mother of three Anne Sacoolas – who is accused of killing Harry Dunn – was a CIA agent, The Mail on Sunday can reveal. Pictured: Mrs. Sacoolas last week at home in Virginia, where she was pictured while filling her car

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles said, after our revelation, “things are now starting to fall into place” about why the US government was blocking its extradition for justice.

Mrs. Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo would have been on the wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr. Dunn last summer.

Mystery still surrounds the exact circumstances of how the Sacoolas family could flee in the days after the crash, but the US government claims to have informed the Foreign Ministry that they were leaving.

Mrs. Sacoolas has been charged with the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton and apologized for the 19-year-old Harry’s death, but refuses to return to Britain.

Mrs. Sacoolas has been charged with the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton and apologized for the 19-year-old Harry's death, but refuses to return to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn

Mrs. Sacoolas has been charged with the fatal accident outside RAF Croughton and apologized for the 19-year-old Harry’s death, but refuses to return to Britain. Pictured: Harry Dunn

However, Harry’s family claimed that there had been a “cover-up” and vowed to keep fighting to bring her back to Britain.

Multiple sources in both Washington and London have confirmed Mrs. Sacoolas’ CIA background, but the US government insists that she does not spy on Britain.

Harry's mother Charlotte Charles (photo) said that after our revelation, things are now starting to fall into place why the US government was blocking her extradition to face justice

Harry’s mother Charlotte Charles (photo) said that after our revelation, things are now starting to fall into place why the US government was blocking her extradition to face justice

Sources from the US government said Mrs. Sacoolas was “inactive” in the UK, although a security source said, “You never really leave the CIA.”

One government source even claimed that Mrs. Sacoolas had been “older than her husband” in the American intelligence community.

Mrs. Charles said to The Mail last Sunday: “Things are now starting to fall into place. In our deepest, darkest hour, we couldn’t understand how someone could simply board a plane after such a disastrous crash and leave a destroyed family behind.

“We have also found it impossible to find out why the US government has behaved lawlessly in harboring Anne Sacoolas. But nobody is above the law. Whether you are a CIA officer, a diplomat or someone else, the Vienna Convention states that you must abide by and respect the rules and regulations of the host country.

“Her departure and the US government that protects her and refuses the extradition request is nothing less than a disgrace and we will not stand for it. Whether she is CIA or not, she must come back and I will not rest until she does. “

Mrs. Sacoolas's right-hand drive Volvo would have been on the wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr. Dunn last summer. Pictured: Mrs. Sacoolas

Mrs. Sacoolas’s right-hand drive Volvo would have been on the wrong side of the road when it collided with Mr. Dunn last summer. Pictured: Mrs. Sacoolas

Our revelation comes at a time of tense diplomatic relations between the UK and America due to Boris Johnson’s refusal to forbid Chinese technology giant Huawei to build part of Britain’s 5G telephone network, as well as the US’s refusal to Sacoolas to be delivered.

Home secretary Priti Patel, on the other hand, gave the green light last week to extradite Mike Lynch, one of Britain’s most successful business people for an American fraud case. Her decision opened the Tory divisions, with former cabinet minister David Davis using an article in The Mail on Sunday – on the opposite page – to label US and UK extradition arrangements as a “bad treaty.”

The UK and US governments insist that Mrs. Sacoolas had diplomatic immunity at the time of the accident while her husband worked as a technical officer at the Northamptonshire Air Force Base. The Foreign Ministry confirmed that Mrs. Sacoolas “had been reported to us as a spouse with no official role” – but senior Whitehall figures have confirmed that she knew about her CIA history.

Harry's family claimed there had been a 'cover-up' and vowed to keep fighting to bring Mrs. Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured from left to right: Tim Dunn (Harry's father), Charlotte Charles (Harry's mother), Tracey Dunn and Bruce Charles

Harry’s family claimed there had been a ‘cover-up’ and vowed to keep fighting to bring Mrs. Sacoolas back to Britain. Pictured from left to right: Tim Dunn (Harry’s father), Charlotte Charles (Harry’s mother), Tracey Dunn and Bruce Charles

The US Department of Foreign Affairs declined to comment on our revelations yesterday and only said, “The driver was the husband of an accredited diplomat in the UK.”

In December, the public prosecutor announced it was accusing Mrs. Sacoolas of Harry’s death, but her lawyers said the prospect of 14 years in prison was “disproportionate” for what was “a terrible but unintended accident.”

And last month, the US government rejected an extradition request, destroying Harry’s family.

Last month, the US government refused an extradition request, destroying Harry's family. Pictured: Harry

Last month, the US government refused an extradition request, destroying Harry’s family. Pictured: Harry

Mrs. Patel’s approval of Mr Lynch’s extradition, however, has revealed an imbalance in extradition arrangements between the US and the UK. Former Brexit secretary, Mr. Davis, is furious that Mrs. Patel allowed the billionaire to be extradited to prosecute in the US before a separate civil fraud case against him reaches his conclusion at the High Court in London.

Mr. Lynch, who built his software company Autonomy in an FTSE 100 heavyweight before being sold to Hewlett-Packard for £ 8.3 billion in 2011, handed himself over to the police last week and was released on bail of £ 10 million. He is accused of fraudulently inflating the value of Autonomy before it was sold to HP, earning a fortune.

He denies the allegations and claims that the American company failed the acquisition.

His lawyers have argued that the case should be settled before British courts, not America, because Lynch is a British citizen who has a British company listed on the London Stock Exchange and is governed by English law and UK accounting standards.

Mr. Lynch’s local MP, Greg Hands, joined Mr. Davis at the end of last month to meet Patel and begged her to wait for the High Court to complete the trial.

Mr. Davis writes Sunday in today’s Mail, accusing Mrs. Patel of Mr. Lynch’s “spirit” before the verdict to America and says that the decision shows how the extradition treaty is overly skewed in favor of America, while it is little to protect the British.

“When the US Department of Justice asks for the extradition of a British citizen, we actually have no choice but to cough them up,” he writes.

But if British authorities want to extradite an American, the US Secretary of State can “process” the request. What the US “was allowed to do” was made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of Harry Dunn.

Mrs Sacoolas’s lawyers did not respond to requests for comment last night.

DAVID DAVIS: Thanks to the deeply unjust treaty of Tony Blair, it is a rule for Americans and another for the British

By David Davies for the mail on Sunday

It is just over a week ago that we have restored our status as an independent, sovereign nation and have followed our own path in the world.

And yet last week in Westminster Magistrates Court we saw a vivid example of Britain that had already given up its sovereignty, this time over its legal system, with the formal arrest of Dr. Mike Lynch for possible extradition to America.

Dr. Lynch is one of the most successful entrepreneurs in this country. He founded an innovative British company, Autonomy, which was purchased in 2011 by Hewlett-Packard. Now US prosecutors claim that he should be tried in America on charges of how he ran that company and how it was sold to HP, who has accused him of fraud.

But British law is on the move. The Serious Fraud Office has investigated the allegations against him and decided that there was no trial in 2015.

In the Westminster Magistrates Court last week we saw a lively example of Great Britain giving up all its sovereignty, this time over its legal system, with the formal arrest of Dr. Mike Lynch (photo) for possible extradition to America, writes DAVID DAVIES

In the Westminster Magistrates Court last week we saw a lively example of Great Britain giving up all its sovereignty, this time over its legal system, with the formal arrest of Dr. Mike Lynch (photo) for possible extradition to America, writes DAVID DAVIES

HP also has a civil case against Dr. Lynch filed with the English Supreme Court. It is just over after ten months of extensive testimony and the judge will decide in due course. That case reviewed millions of documents and heard dozens of witnesses in court.

Dr. Lynch himself spent more than a month on the witness stand, one of the longest registered exams.

There is no doubt that Dr. Lynch has experienced justice in the UK and that our system works regardless of the outcome.

But before the judge can give a verdict, the Minister of the Interior has stated that Dr. Lynch must be transferred to America.

The fact that he was arrested at all offers a great deal of relief from the problems with our relationship with the United States. When the US Department of Justice asks for the extradition of a British citizen, we actually have no choice but to cough them up. The extradition treaty between the UK and the US of 2003 says that the Home Secretary must ‘process’ the request.

If the UK is to be extradited from the US, we must clear up a greater burden of demonstrating 'probable cause', which - unlike in the UK - can be challenged in court. The US Secretary of State can then process the request. What the US 'wanted' to do was made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of Harry Dunn (photo), writes DAVID DAVIES

If the UK is to be extradited from the US, we must clear up a greater burden of demonstrating ‘probable cause’, which – unlike in the UK – can be challenged in court. The US Secretary of State can then process the request. What the US ‘wanted’ to do was made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of Harry Dunn (photo), writes DAVID DAVIES

The US prosecutors are under no obligation to prove their case except to mention “reasonable suspicion,” and there is no prima facie consideration of the charges in the UK.

Conversely, to extradite from the US, the UK needs a higher burden of demonstrating “probable cause,” which – unlike in the UK – can be challenged in court. The US Secretary of State can then process the request.

What the US ‘perhaps’ wanted to do was made crystal clear in the recent case of Anne Sacoolas and the death of Harry Dunn.

The extradition treaty between the US and the UK is a bad one. It was negotiated in secret by the Labor Government of Tony Blair, debated in a hurry and unilaterally determined by Blair about serious objections from all sides of the parliament buildings. Its rapid passage was intended to enable the rapid processing of potential terrorists after 9/11, but that is not how it was used.

The extradition treaty between the US and the UK is a bad one. It was negotiated secretly by Tony Blair's labor government, writes DAVID DAVIES. Pictured: Blair earlier this week

The extradition treaty between the US and the UK is a bad one. It was negotiated secretly by Tony Blair’s labor government, writes DAVID DAVIES. Pictured: Blair earlier this week

The evidence of the imbalance is in the figures. Since 2007, the UK has surrendered 135 British nationals to the US, including 99 for non-violent crimes. In the same period, the US surrendered only 11 to Britain. This cannot be the result of a fair system that is applied correctly.

Dr. Lynch now faces the prospect of supplementing these grim statistics. In his case, the alleged behavior all took place in the UK, according to UK law. We now look at the bizarre prospect that a British citizen could be tried and possibly acquitted by an English judge, where the burden of proof against him is lower, but is in an American prison with a charge where the burden is higher before the case in the UK it has even been decided.

Why should we prioritize the US legal system over ours?

If Dr. Lynch is extradited and bail refused, as most foreign suspects are, he will be confronted with terrible circumstances that are far worse than anything in the UK. He is likely to be in a heavily guarded prison in a tight cell with gang members, drug dealers, and murderers.

And by possibly selling him that river, we send him to a place where 97 percent of the cases are handled through bargains.

People who were previously extradited to the US were told that if they did not plead guilty, they would be refused bail and spent 35 years in a heavily guarded US prison, but if they plead guilty they would only get three years , possibly serve part of it in a British prison.

Prosecutors will use this practice to To convince Lynch to confess less. If he refuses, he is confronted with the prospect of an intentionally intimidating, long sentence, and the costs of the trial can be as high as millions.

Dr. Lynch is right to resist extradition. He stands up for all of us against this unfair system.

It will send an icy wind through “global Britain” if all British companies are effectively forced to comply with US laws and standards, and subject to US prosecution if not.

It would paralyze the ability of the city and Britain to determine its own future.

That is why we have to look again at our delivery arrangements. They influence our ability to establish and enforce our own laws.

We must ensure that our arrangements are fair, balanced and based on reciprocity. We must give British citizens, including our business people and entrepreneurs, the protection, security and justice they deserve.

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