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The ‘grounding area’ of the Thwaites glacier of the ‘Awareness Day’ of Antarctica is revealed in the first video

The first images of the lower part of the Thwaites glacier on ‘Judgment Day’ have been returned by a robotic yellow submarine called Icefin.

Glaciologists have compared innovative images and videos with the first steps on the moon taken by Neil Armstrong in 1969.

Early analyzes reveal that the turbulent and warm waters beneath the ice sheet, which is the same size as Britain, are causing an “unstoppable retreat.”

Experts have previously predicted that if Thwaites melted completely, this would lead to a significant increase in world sea levels of about two feet (65 cm).

The impact on coastal communities around the world would be catastrophic.

The first footage from the bottom of the Thwaites glacier on 'Judgment Day' has been returned by a yellow robotic submarine called Icefin (pictured)

The first footage from the bottom of the Thwaites glacier on ‘Judgment Day’ has been returned by a yellow robotic submarine called Icefin (pictured)

The innovative images and the video sent by Icefin (pictured) have been compared by glaciologists with the first steps on the moon taken by Neil Armstrong in 1969

The innovative images and the video sent by Icefin (pictured) have been compared by glaciologists with the first steps on the moon taken by Neil Armstrong in 1969

The innovative images and the video sent by Icefin (pictured) have been compared by glaciologists with the first steps on the moon taken by Neil Armstrong in 1969

A grounding line is the line between where the glacier rests on the seabed and where it floats on water. Some experts call it a grounding line, and some call it a grounding zone, since its exact shape is unknown. It is a crucial site for melting glaciers (pictured, where the grounding line and Icefin (not to scale) are located)

A grounding line is the line between where the glacier rests on the seabed and where it floats on water. Some experts call it a grounding line, and some call it a grounding zone, since its exact shape is unknown. It is a crucial site for melting glaciers (pictured, where the grounding line and Icefin (not to scale) are located)

A grounding line is the line between where the glacier rests on the seabed and where it floats on water. Some experts call it a grounding line, and some call it a grounding zone, since its exact shape is unknown. It is a crucial site for melting glaciers (pictured, where the grounding line and Icefin (not to scale) are located)

The icy “roof” seen in the video is the bottom of the glacier’s ice shelf. This section floats on water instead of being embedded in the seabed.

What is the land line?

A grounding line is the point where a glacier meets the seabed and ocean water.

It is the line between the place where the glacier rests on the seabed and where it floats on water.

The further the grounding line recedes, the faster the ice can flow to the sea, raising the sea level.

For the Thwaites glacier, the ice shelf is 1,900 feet thick on the ground line.

Preliminary data from Icefin were analyzed by a team of researchers from the University of New York and found, for the first time, the presence of warm water under the glacier on its grounding line, where the glacier rests on the ocean floor.

David Holland, director of the Laboratory of Dynamics of Environmental Fluids at the University of New York, said: “If these waters are causing the melting of glaciers in Antarctica, the resulting changes in sea level will be felt in the most inhabited parts of the world”.

“The fact that our team has recorded such warm water in a section of the Thwaites grounding zone where we have known that the glacier is melting suggests that it could be experiencing an unstoppable setback that has huge implications for the level increase of the global sea, “he says. Holland, professor at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences of the NYU.

Icefin was deployed five times and covered a distance of more than nine miles (15 km) after being released through a well 2,000 feet (600 meters) deep and 12 inches (35 cm) wide earlier this month .

Two of the missions involved traveling as close as possible to the land line.

Recently it was announced that in mid-January scientists carried out the first field work in Thwaites.

One of the projects of a large joint task force between the United Kingdom and the United States was to drill holes through the glacier near its grounding line.

Some experts call it a grounding line, and some call it a grounding zone, since its exact shape is unknown and the base of the glacier can come into contact with the seabed in several places.

In this grounding zone, the ice shelf is 1,900 feet (580m) thick.

The submersible yellow submarine robot Icefin is able to navigate the waters below zero and was fed through a well to study how the glacier is melting.

Icefin is designed to take various measures, including monitoring the turbulence of the water and its temperature.

Turbulence causes the fresh water of the glacier to mix with the salt water of the ocean.

Icefin swam more than nine miles (15 km) during five missions, including two at the grounding site, where it is believed that the largest merger is occurring.

One of the projects of a large United Kingdom-United States joint task force drilled holes through the glacier near its grounding area (pictured, Thwaites researchers)

One of the projects of a large United Kingdom-United States joint task force drilled holes through the glacier near its grounding area (pictured, Thwaites researchers)

One of the projects of a large United Kingdom-United States joint task force drilled holes through the glacier near its grounding area (pictured, Thwaites researchers)

Icefin was deployed five times and covered a distance of more than 15 kilometers (nine miles) after being released through a well 600 meters (2000 feet) deep and 35 cm (12 inches) wide.

Icefin was deployed five times and covered a distance of more than 15 kilometers (nine miles) after being released through a well 600 meters (2000 feet) deep and 35 cm (12 inches) wide.

Icefin was deployed five times and covered a distance of more than 15 kilometers (nine miles) after being released through a well 600 meters (2000 feet) deep and 35 cm (12 inches) wide.

The researchers studied data from the remote controlled submersible robot and discovered that hot turbulent water is causing high levels of fusion in the earthing zone, photographed here for the first time by Icefin

The researchers studied data from the remote controlled submersible robot and discovered that hot turbulent water is causing high levels of fusion in the earthing zone, photographed here for the first time by Icefin

The researchers studied data from the remote controlled submersible robot and discovered that hot turbulent water is causing high levels of fusion in the earthing zone, photographed here for the first time by Icefin

The Icefin robot is depicted being recovered after one of its five missions under the Thwaites glacier. Two missions took him as close as possible to the land line and took the first measurements and filming of the critical juncture.

The Icefin robot is depicted being recovered after one of its five missions under the Thwaites glacier. Two missions took him as close as possible to the land line and took the first measurements and filming of the critical juncture.

The Icefin robot is depicted being recovered after one of its five missions under the Thwaites glacier. Two missions took him as close as possible to the land line and took the first measurements and filming of the critical juncture.

Dr. Britney Schmidt, a glaciologist at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said: “We saw incredible interactions of sediment-driven ice in the [grounding] line and the rapid melting of warm ocean water. ”

Icefin measured, photographed and mapped the process causing fusion in this critical part of the glacier.

The icy “roof” seen in the video is the bottom of the glacier’s ice shelf. This section floats on water instead of being embedded in the seabed.

The observations made by Icefin capture sediments that were at the bottom of the sea only a few hours before, as the glacier moves constantly, exposing new sections of the ice.

Britney Schmidt, a glaciologist at the Georgia Institute of Technology, said The athletic: ‘We can definitely see it melt.

“There are some places where you can see streams of particles coming out of glaciers, textures and particles that tell us that it is melting quite quickly and irregularly.”

The merger of Thwaites is a cause for global concern, since its enormous magnitude means that it contains enough ice that, if melted, would have global implications.

The sea level rise would be drastic, up to about 25 inches (63.5 cm), and the range of the wave effect would be enormous.

THE WITHDRAWAL OF THE THWAITES GLACIER

Thwaitas The glacier is slightly smaller than the total size of the United Kingdom, approximately the same size as the state of Washington, and is located in the Amundsen Sea.

It is up to 4,000 meters (13,100 feet thick) and is considered key to making projections of global sea level rise.

The glacier is retreating in front of the warming of the ocean and is believed to be unstable because its interior is more than two kilometers (1.2 miles) below sea level, while, on the coast, the bottom of the glacier is quite little deep.

The Thwaites Glacier is the size of Florida and is located in the Amundsen Sea. It has a thickness of up to 4,000 meters and is considered key to make projections of the global rise in sea level.

The Thwaites Glacier is the size of Florida and is located in the Amundsen Sea. It has a thickness of up to 4,000 meters and is considered key to make projections of the global rise in sea level.

The Thwaites Glacier is the size of Florida and is located in the Amundsen Sea. It has a thickness of up to 4,000 meters and is considered key to make projections of the global rise in sea level.

The Thwaites Glacier has experienced a significant acceleration of flow since the 1970s.

From 1992 to 2011, the center of the Thwaites grounding line receded by almost 14 kilometers (nine miles).

The annual ice discharge of this region as a whole has increased by 77 percent since 1973.

Because its interior is connected to the vast portion of the West Antarctic ice sheet that lies deep below sea level, the glacier is considered a gateway to most of the potential contribution of the sea level of Western Antarctica

The collapse of the Thwaites glacier would cause an overall sea level rise of one to two meters (three and six feet), with the potential of more than double the western Antarctic ice sheet.

Already, Thwaites accounts for approximately four percent of the global sea level rise as water warming causes it to melt from the bottom.

Researchers have long been concerned that a turning point in the stability of their foundations could cause a glacier to collapse.

Icefin was developed and deployed by scientists to study the root of the problem, since no camera had been taken to a grounding point of any glacier, let alone one as important as Thwaites.

“Visiting the grounding line is one of the reasons why a job like this is important because we can drive to it and measure where it is,” said Dr. Schmidt.

“It’s the first time someone has done that or has seen the grounding area of ​​an important underwater glacier, and that is the place where the greatest degree of melting and destabilization can occur.”

The researchers also took sediment cores from the seafloor and beneath parts of the glacier that were in the bed to examine the quality of the support point offered by Thwaites.

‘We know that warmer ocean waters are eroding many of the glaciers of West Antarctica, but we are particularly concerned about the Thwaites.

“This new data will provide a new perspective on the processes taking place, so we can predict future change with greater certainty,” said Keith Nicholls, an oceanographer at the British Antarctic Survey.

What would the rise in sea level mean for coastal cities?

World sea levels could rise up to 10 feet (3 meters) if the Thwaites glacier in West Antarctica collapses.

The rising sea level threatens cities from Shanghai to London, to lower areas of Florida or Bangladesh, and to entire nations such as the Maldives.

In the United Kingdom, for example, an increase of 6.7 feet (2 meters) or more can cause areas such as Hull, Peterborough, Portsmouth and parts of East London and the Thames estuary to be submerged.

The collapse of the glacier, which could begin with decades, could also submerge important cities like New York and Sydney.

Parts of New Orleans, Houston and Miami in the southern United States would also be particularly affected.

A 2014 study examined by the union of interested scientists examined 52 sea level indicators in communities across the US. UU.

He found that tidal floods will increase dramatically in many places on the east coast and the gulf, according to a conservative estimate of predicted sea level increases according to current data.

The results showed that most of these communities will experience a sharp increase in the number and severity of tidal flood events in the coming decades.

By 2030, it is projected that more than half of the 52 communities studied will experience, on average, at least 24 tidal floods per year in exposed areas, assuming projections of moderate sea level rise. Twenty of these communities could see tripling or more in tidal flood events.

The mid-Atlantic coast is expected to see some of the largest increases in flood frequency. Places like Annapolis, Maryland and Washington, DC can expect more than 150 tidal floods a year, and several places in New Jersey could see 80 tidal floods or more.

In the United Kingdom, an increase of two meters (6.5 feet) by 2040 would see large parts of Kent almost completely submerged, according to the results of an article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science in November 2016.

The areas on the south coast such as Portsmouth, as well as Cambridge and Peterborough would also be greatly affected.

Cities and towns around the Humber estuary, such as Hull, Scunthorpe and Grimsby would also experience intense flooding.

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