The 10,000-year-old arms factory is found in Siberia

An old arms factory that is already 10,000 years old has been discovered right next to the remains of a felled woolly mammoth, paleontologists say.

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Prehistoric people used the site in Siberia to cut off ivory-colored splinters from the two tusks of the furry beast for use in spears and butcher shops, scientists believe.

The mammoth remains, preserved in permafrost, were found this summer on the island of Kotelny, part of the New Siberian archipelago in the Russian Arctic.

Ironically, the modern Kremlin weapon now arrives on the same island, while Vladimir Putin builds a large Arctic military base, the Northern Shamrock near the site.

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An old arms factory that is already 10,000 years old has been discovered right next to the remains of a felled woolly mammoth, paleontologists say. Pictured: nnokenty Pavlov holds the part of the tusk in his hands

An old arms factory that is already 10,000 years old has been discovered right next to the remains of a felled woolly mammoth, paleontologists say. Pictured: researcher Iennokenty Pavlov holds the part of the tusk in his hands

Prehistoric people used the site in Siberia to cut off ivory-colored splinters from the two tusks of the furry beast for use in spears and butcher shops, scientists believe. On the photo: traces of human intervention were detected on the tip of the right tusk of the mammoth Sopkarginsky
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Prehistoric people used the site in Siberia to cut off ivory-colored splinters from the two tusks of the furry beast for use in spears and butcher shops, scientists believe. On the photo: traces of human intervention were detected on the tip of the right tusk of the mammoth Sopkarginsky

Prehistoric people used the site in Siberia to cut off ivory-colored splinters from the two tusks of the furry beast for use in spears and butcher shops, scientists believe. On the photo: traces of human intervention were detected on the tip of the right tusk of the mammoth Sopkarginsky

Researchers of the bones, specialists from the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia – the coldest region of the country – found the & # 39; handicraft & # 39; of humans on the tusks, and also marks on a rib that suggested that the animal was hunted by humans.

& # 39; Traces of processing, presumably by an old man, were found on the tusk fragments, & # 39; told mammoth expert Innokenty Pavlov The Siberian Times.

Carved shards of ivory had sharp edges that were useful for slaughter, but were also used by humans to kill, for example, in spears found in other Siberian locations.

& # 39; The condition of tusk remains clearly indicates that people have cut it to make tools (and weapons). & # 39;

Researchers of the bones, specialists from the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia - the coldest region of the country - found the & # 39; handicraft & # 39; of humans on the tusks, and also marks on a rib that suggested that the animal was hunted by humans. Pictured: the remains of the mammoth

Researchers of the bones, specialists from the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia - the coldest region of the country - found the & # 39; handicraft & # 39; of humans on the tusks, and also marks on a rib that suggested that the animal was hunted by humans. Pictured: the remains of the mammoth

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Researchers of the bones, specialists from the Academy of Sciences of Yakutia – the coldest region of the country – found the & # 39; handicraft & # 39; of humans on the tusks, and also marks on a rib that suggested that the animal was hunted by humans. Pictured: the remains of the mammoth

Carved shards of ivory had sharp edges that were useful for slaughter, but were also used by humans to kill, for example, in spears found in other Siberian locations. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov holds the part of the tusk in his hands

Carved shards of ivory had sharp edges that were useful for slaughter, but were also used by humans to kill, for example, in spears found in other Siberian locations. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov holds the part of the tusk in his hands

Carved shards of ivory had sharp edges that were useful for slaughter, but were also used by humans to kill, for example, in spears found in other Siberian locations. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov holds the part of the tusk in his hands

Further study will be conducted to determine whether the beast has been hunted by an ivory spear carved from the tusk or a previously slaughtered hairy mammoth.

"We will do radiocarbon dating of the remains, but for the time being we can say that the age of the tusk is not less than 10,000 years old," said Mr. Pavlov, after whom the relic is named.

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The expedition was organized with the help of the Russian Geographical Society and the Russian Ministry of Defense.

In the Pleistocene era this island was connected to the Siberian mainland and it is known as a mammoth necropolis.

The site is close to the remains of a pygmy woolly mammoth – presumably a distinct species. Scientists hoped to dig up the carcass of this animal this summer, but found his grave full of water.

Further study will be conducted to determine if the beast was hunted by a spear with an ivory point cut from the tusk - as found on the site - or a previously slaughtered hairy mammoth

Further study will be conducted to determine if the beast was hunted by a spear with an ivory point cut from the tusk - as found on the site - or a previously slaughtered hairy mammoth

Further study will be conducted to determine if the beast was hunted by a spear with an ivory point cut from the tusk – as found on the site – or a previously slaughtered hairy mammoth

The expedition was organized with the help of the Russian Geographical Society and the Russian Ministry of Defense. On the photo: a close-up of the collapsing section of the giant tusk spear
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The expedition was organized with the help of the Russian Geographical Society and the Russian Ministry of Defense. On the photo: a close-up of the collapsing section of the giant tusk spear

The expedition was organized with the help of the Russian Geographical Society and the Russian Ministry of Defense. On the photo: a close-up of the collapsing section of the giant tusk spear

Dubbed & # 39; Golden mammoth & # 39; because of the striking coloration of the fur, the small size of the dead animal, some have led to the belief that it may be evidence of a never before seen & # 39; mini-mammoth & # 39; species that lived during the last ice age.

The adult is 2.1 meters tall, less than half the colossal 16 feet (4.8 meters) height of a normal woolly mammoth.

The remains of the pygmy covered with sand are now embedded in submarine permafrost. The carcass is only visible at low tide on the island of Kotelny, which is located between the Laptev and the Eastern Siberian Sea.

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In August 2018, Russia announced it would open a £ 4.5 million ($ 5.9 million) cloning facility to bring back the woolly mammoth and other long-extinct species.

In addition to woolly mammoths, Russian geneticists will study a number of extinct species, including the woolly rhino, who died 10,000 years ago.

The site is close to the remains of a pygmy woolly mammoth - presumably a distinct species. Scientists hoped to dig up the carcass of this animal this summer, but found his grave full of water. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov looks at the skeleton

The site is close to the remains of a pygmy woolly mammoth - presumably a distinct species. Scientists hoped to dig up the carcass of this animal this summer, but found his grave full of water. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov looks at the skeleton

The site is close to the remains of a pygmy woolly mammoth – presumably a distinct species. Scientists hoped to dig up the carcass of this animal this summer, but found his grave full of water. Pictured: researcher Innokenty Pavlov looks at the skeleton

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The remains of the pygmy covered with sand are now embedded in submarine permafrost. The carcass is only visible at low tide on the island of Kotelny, which is located between the Laptev and the Eastern Siberian Sea. Pictured: excavations that take place on the site

WHAT DO WE KNOW OF THE WOOLLY MAMMOTH?

The woolly mammoth roamed the icy tundra of Europe and North America for 140,000 years and disappeared at the end of the Pleistocene period, 10,000 years ago.

They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals in science, because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved.

The males were approximately 12 feet (3.5 m) long, while the females were slightly smaller.

Curved tusks were up to 16 feet (5 m) long and their lower abdomen boasted a coat of rough hair up to 3 feet (1 m) long.

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Small ears and short tails prevented the loss of vital body heat.

Their tribes had at the end & # 39; two fingers & # 39; to help them pick grass, twigs and other vegetation.

The Woolly Mammoth is one of the best understood prehistoric animals in science, because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved (artist & # 39; s impression)

The Woolly Mammoth is one of the best understood prehistoric animals in science, because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved (artist & # 39; s impression)

The Woolly Mammoth is one of the best understood prehistoric animals in science, because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved (artist & # 39; s impression)

They get their name from the Russian & # 39; mammoth & # 39 ;, or the earth mole, because the animals were believed to live underground and died in contact with light – explaining why they were always found dead and half buried.

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It was believed that their bones once belonged to extinct races of giants.

Wool-haired mammoths and modern elephants are closely related and share 99.4 percent of their genes.

The two species took different evolutionary paths six million years ago, at about the same time that humans and chimpanzees went their own way.

Woolly mammoths lived with early humans, who hunted them for food and used their bones and tusks to make weapons and art.

The cloning laboratories – some deep in the permafrost soil of Yakutsk – are aimed at expanding current research by Russian scientists, working closely with a team of South Korean specialists to restore the long-lost mammals.

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Yakutsk, the capital of Russia's diamond-rich Sakha Republic, is a hotspot for frozen animal remains.

No less than 80 percent of the samples of Pleistocene and Holocene animals with preserved soft tissues discovered in Russia have been excavated in the region.

DNA from the ancient animals can be kept in remains encased in frozen soil, known as permafrost, for tens of thousands of years.

More recently, the Vladimir Putin government announced that it would modernize its Northern Shamrock Military base on Kotelny Island.

Vladimir Putin's government recently announced that it is upgrading the Northern Shamrock military base on the island of Kotelny (photo)

Vladimir Putin's government recently announced that it is upgrading the Northern Shamrock military base on the island of Kotelny (photo)

Vladimir Putin's government recently announced that it is upgrading the Northern Shamrock military base on the island of Kotelny (photo)

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Russia installed an advanced missile defense system at the Arctic base (photo), located in the middle of the main shipping route of the region

Russia installed an advanced missile defense system at the Arctic base (photo), located in the middle of the main shipping route of the region

Russia installed an advanced missile defense system at the Arctic base (photo), located in the middle of the main shipping route of the region

About 250 soldiers (photos & # 39; s) are responsible for anti-aircraft and anti-ship weapons at the base that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

About 250 soldiers (photos & # 39; s) are responsible for anti-aircraft and anti-ship weapons at the base that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

About 250 soldiers (photos & # 39; s) are responsible for anti-aircraft and anti-ship weapons at the base that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

Russia, the US, Canada, Denmark and Norway have all claimed parts of the Arctic because the shrinking polar ice creates new opportunities for resource exploration and new shipping lanes.

In April 2019, Russia announced that it had installed an advanced missile defense system at the North Pole base, located in the center of the region's main shipping route.

About 250 soldiers are responsible for anti-aircraft and anti-ship weapons at the base that lies between the Laptev Sea and the East Siberian Sea.

That is the remote nature of the base, it has sufficient supplies to remain self-sufficient for 12 months.

The mammoth remains, preserved in permafrost, were found this summer on the island of Kotelny, part of the New Siberian archipelago in the Russian Arctic.

The mammoth remains, preserved in permafrost, were found this summer on the island of Kotelny, part of the New Siberian archipelago in the Russian Arctic.

The mammoth remains, preserved in permafrost, were found this summer on the island of Kotelny, part of the New Siberian archipelago in the Russian Arctic.

In the Pleistocene era this island was connected to the Siberian mainland and it is known as a mammoth necropolis. Pictured: terrain on the island

In the Pleistocene era this island was connected to the Siberian mainland and it is known as a mammoth necropolis. Pictured: terrain on the island

In the Pleistocene era this island was connected to the Siberian mainland and it is known as a mammoth necropolis. Pictured: terrain on the island

COULD WE RECOVER WOOLLY MAMMOTH & # 39; S?

The & # 39; extinction & # 39; of the mammoth has become a realistic prospect because of revolutionary techniques for processing genes that allow the precise selection and insertion of DNA from samples frozen in millennia in Siberian ice.

The most commonly used technique, known as CRISPR / Cas9, has transformed genetic engineering since it was first demonstrated in 2012.

The system allows the & # 39; cut and paste & # 39; manipulation of strands of DNA with a precision that has not been seen before.

Using this technique, scientists were able to cut and paste cleaved mammoth DNA into Asian elephants to make an elephant-mammoth hybrid.

Mammoth wandered 140,000 years through the icy tundra of Europe and North America and disappeared at the end of the Pleistocene period, 10,000 years ago.

They are one of the best understood prehistoric animals in science, because their remains are often not fossilized but frozen and preserved.

The most commonly used technique, known as CRISPR / Cas9, enables scientists to make a hybrid animal from the preserved fossils of woolly mammoths and to fuse them with cells from a living elephant. The two species share 99.4 percent of their DNA

The most commonly used technique, known as CRISPR / Cas9, enables scientists to make a hybrid animal from the preserved fossils of woolly mammoths and to fuse them with cells from a living elephant. The two species share 99.4 percent of their DNA

The most commonly used technique, known as CRISPR / Cas9, enables scientists to make a hybrid animal from the preserved fossils of woolly mammoths and to fuse them with cells from a living elephant. The two species share 99.4 percent of their DNA

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