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Sad statistic behind two thirds of Queensland’s Covid death toll as the state hits another record

The vast majority of Covid deaths in Queensland in the past two weeks have come from the elderly who had not received their booster shot.

The state recorded a further 5,804 new infections on Sunday, while Australia as a whole had 46,310 – slightly below the seven-day average.

Acting Chief Health Officer Peter Aitken said 97 percent of deaths in the state were over 65s, and two-thirds of those had not received the third injection.

“Remember, the vaccine is meant to prevent people from getting sick,” he said.

Two-thirds of Covid deaths in Queensland in the past two weeks have come from elderly people who have had their booster shot

Two-thirds of Covid deaths in Queensland in the past two weeks have come from elderly people who have had their booster shot

dr. Aitken said national models suggested the latest wave was yet to reach its peak and urged everyone to get their final inoculation

“It’s up to all of us to prove that the modeling is wrong in many ways,” he said.

There are 5,307 people across the country battling the virus in hospital, 159 of whom are in intensive care and 33 requiring ventilators.

Queensland has 1,078, a record for the entire pandemic, with 19 in ICU and 12 on ventilators.

dr. Aitken said people should embrace the use of masks again and work from home whenever possible if they feel unwell.

He said his office was “working on a final decision” with other state leaders in national discussions about when the seven-day isolation period should end.

Prime Minister Anthony Albanese admitted it was understandable that some Australians were confused about the latest advice on wearing face masks.

No state leader is considering a new mask mandate, but most are advocating for indoor use or when social distancing isn’t possible.

“The issue of mandates is, of course, a question of (which) governments of states and territories are responsible,” Mr Albanian said on Sunday.

ICU numbers are relatively low compared to previous waves, but experts said the number of cases would likely continue to rise and Australians should not become complacent.

dr.  Peter Aitken, QLD's acting Chief Health Officer, said 97 percent of deaths in the state are over 65s, and the majority of those had not received the latest injection.

dr. Peter Aitken, QLD’s acting Chief Health Officer, said 97 percent of deaths in the state are over 65s, and the majority of those had not received the latest injection.

Elderly care providers are calling for urgent action to protect residents and staff from a wintry Covid-19 wave that affects more than a third of the country’s amenities.

Aged and Community Care Providers Association said 6,000 residents and 3,400 employees were infected in 1,013 facilities.

The association’s interim director, Paul Sadler, said 10 to 15 percent of staff are already self-isolating or quarantining at home, and will put intense pressure on residents and workers in the coming weeks.

“(The association) is concerned that up to two-thirds of retirement homes could be affected by active outbreaks in the coming weeks,” it said in a statement on Sunday.

“The increased availability of personnel over the past week, including the Australian Defense Force, has been welcome, but there is still a shortage.

‘The reality is that we cannot leave the elderly without adequate care for too long.’

I have been responsible,

I have been responsible,” the prime minister said on Sunday. While the number of ICs remains relatively low compared to previous waves, experts say the number of cases is likely to continue to rise

Mr Sadler said 2301 residents will have died in 2022, including 114 in the past week.

He called for increased support for an increase in the workforce, including ADF personnel, until at least September.

In the longer term, Mr Sadler said the federal government must plan to resolve chronic staff shortages, prepare for future outbreaks and implement reforms recommended by the recent royal commission in aged care.

‘The coming weeks will be crucial for elderly care. We must do everything we can to put the protection of the elderly first and support our aged care workers,” he said.

Minister of Elderly Care Anika Wells recently emphasized the importance of a unified approach to prevent the further spread of the virus in the sector.

‘I enthusiastically encourage these matters to go back to the national cabinet, so that we can tackle this nationally,’ she says.

The death toll in Australia has surpassed 11,000 and rose by 36 on Sunday.

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