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A new study has shown that many Australians fail when it comes to basic personal hygiene practices such as hand washing (stock image)

Think twice before shaking someone's hand! A quarter of Australians believe they don't have to wash their hands after going to the toilet

  • New research shows that a large number of Australians are struggling with basic hygiene
  • More than a quarter of the respondents revealed that they did not wash themselves after going to the toilet
  • Some respondents also said they didn't think their hands would get dirty every time
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Australians struggle with basic hygiene and do not wash their hands after using the toilet, new research has revealed.

Data collected by Dyson and YouGov showed that 1000 people were interrogated, a quarter believed they didn't have to wash and dry their hands after using the bathroom.

In addition, 16 percent revealed that after using the bathroom, they do not wash their hands at all because they think their hands do not get dirty every time.

A new study has shown that many Australians fail when it comes to basic personal hygiene practices such as hand washing (stock image)

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A new study has shown that many Australians fail when it comes to basic personal hygiene practices such as hand washing (stock image)

Not only did it reveal how poor Australians did when it came to stopping the spread of germs through hand washing, the study also showed that there was a clear difference between men's and women's habits.

Three quarters of the men surveyed said more often than women that they had seen someone leave a public bathroom without washing their hands.

While only 13 percent of women rather than men have seen a person leave a public bathroom without washing or drying their hands.

A new study has shown that a quarter of Australians think they don't have to wash their hands after going to the toilet

A new study has shown that a quarter of Australians think they don't have to wash their hands after going to the toilet

A new study has shown that a quarter of Australians think they don't have to wash their hands after going to the toilet

poll

Do you wash your hands every time you leave the bathroom?

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The study also emphasized the difference in hand wash habits between baby boomers, millennials and generation X.

Those born between 1944 and 1964 (baby boomers) are 92 percent more likely than those born between millennials and Generation X to see someone leave a public bathroom without washing or drying their hands.

In addition to washing hands, the survey also asked participants about drying hands – something that is just as important.

It found that 30 percent wiped their hands on their clothing and 28 percent cited no drying option as a reason to skip the step altogether.

When should you wash and dry your hands?

Although hand washing and good hygiene may be common knowledge, not everyone seems to make the connection.

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The Food Safety Information Council has given a short list of when people should wash and dry their hands:

1) For handling, preparing and eating food

2) After touching raw meat, fish, eggs in the shell or poultry

3) After visiting the toilet, visiting the toilet with children (or others) and changing diapers

4) After blowing your nose

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5) After touching a pet

6) After gardening

A quarter of the people surveyed (25 percent) said they didn't think they should dry their hands every time.

The survey correlates with new Australian hygiene figures released by Wednesday The Food Safety Information Council (FSIC).

76% of the men washed their hands after the toilet visit, compared to 86% of the women.

Washing hands thoroughly is a combination of running water, soap and thoroughly drying hands
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Washing hands thoroughly is a combination of running water, soap and thoroughly drying hands

Washing hands thoroughly is a combination of running water, soap and thoroughly drying hands

Young people were also less likely to wash their hands after visiting the bathroom compared to the elderly.

Only 69 percent of people under the age of 34 followed good hygiene, while 86 percent of people over 50 washed their hands.

& # 39; Washing hands properly, using running water, thoroughly drying soap and hands is a basic public health message that people seem to be forgetting, & # 39; said FSIC communications director Lydia Buchtmann.

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