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Pauline Hanson has called on the government to “tighten” immigration laws

Pauline Hanson has called on the government to “tighten” immigration laws after a new report revealed that 50,000 migrants who have not been granted asylum in Australia remain in the country.

The leader of the One Nation hurled the current long-standing appeal process blamed for the backlog and said migrants should not be allowed to apply for asylum online.

Mrs. Hanson said that asylum seekers – the majority are from Malaysia, China and India – have arrived by plane on thousands of tourists on tourist visas in Australia to apply to remain as asylum seekers in the country.

‘It is absolutely ridiculous and I have been working on that for a long time. When they actually came to the country, they appealed to AAT (the administrative tribunal), “she said today on Monday.

“Then they give a bridging visa, they have the right to work like any other Australian.

‘Many people who apply in Malaysia – that is the largest country where we mainly have visa holders – in January alone there were nearly 2000.

‘They come here as tourists and apply for asylum seekers in the country. Most are not allowed to stay. About 90 percent get the right to stay in Australia. “

A nation leader, Pauline Hanson, dismissed the current long-standing appeal process blamed for the backlog, saying that migrants cannot apply for asylum online

A nation leader, Pauline Hanson, dismissed the current lengthy appeal process blamed on the backlog, saying that migrants should not be allowed to apply for asylum online

The anger of the Queensland senator comes after The Sydney Morning Herald reported 46.291 people are waiting for deportation from Australia while the government is struggling to catch up.

Meanwhile, about 38,000 people who have traveled to the country by plane are still waiting to hear about their refugee status.

According to government figures, 1,931 people from abroad arrived in January asylum, resulting in fewer than five involuntary deportations and 19 voluntary deportations of those who were denied access.

Of those 1,931 people, 255 came from India, 83 from Fiji, 61 from the Philippines, and 309 from China.

The Sydney Morning Herald reported that 44,291 people are waiting for deportation from Australia, while the government is struggling to resolve a backlog (depicted asylum seekers boarding an aircraft in Cocos Islands in July 2014)

The Sydney Morning Herald reported that 44,291 people are waiting for deportation from Australia, while the government is struggling to resolve a backlog (depicted asylum seekers boarding an aircraft in Cocos Islands in July 2014)

The Sydney Morning Herald reported that 44,291 people are waiting for deportation from Australia, while the government is struggling to resolve a backlog (depicted asylum seekers boarding an aircraft in Cocos Islands in July 2014)

Only 3.3 percent of those who traveled from China will eventually receive a protection visa, the publication said.

The remaining 546 came from Malaysia, where tourists can obtain electronic travel authorities from travel agencies.

“If they can apply online from Malaysia, and India is another, and China – those are the three countries. Well, they need to see if they are going to embassy to get their visa, “Mrs. Hanson added.

“Don’t allow them to do it online because it can take up to two years for their kickback and then they work in the time period, get all the money they want, and just before it comes down, they will fly out of the country .

‘It’s a joke. It is absolutely ridiculous. We must tighten the laws in the country. They must not be able to use our services and the AAT to apply for asylum seekers.

‘The government must make a decision based on those facts. They must not be able to appeal against it. ”

At the end of last month Labor spokeswoman Kristina Keneally gave her first important policy speech since she took over the portfolio, and said that Australia has changed from a nation built by permanent residents to a temporary visa-dependent economy.

Labor spokeswoman Kristina Keneally suggested that asylum seekers who arrived by plane were exploited by unscrupulous employers

Labor spokeswoman Kristina Keneally suggested that asylum seekers who arrived by plane were exploited by unscrupulous employers

Labor spokeswoman Kristina Keneally suggested that asylum seekers who arrived by plane were exploited by unscrupulous employers

She repeated it too earlier warnings that people smugglers have switched their business model from boats to planes, with 100,000 asylum seekers arriving by plane in the last six years.

The number of people with a temporary visa in Australia has risen in the last four years from 1.8 million to 2.2 million.

Australia is now home to the second largest temporary labor migrant in the world, behind the United States.

Senator Keneally acknowledged the importance of attracting skilled labor, but accused the government of doing nothing to reduce its “worsening” dependence on temporary migrants.

Mrs. Keneally suggested that asylum seekers who arrived by plane had been exploited by unscrupulous employers.

“There is nothing wrong with applying for asylum – it is an important right,” she said in October.

“In 90 percent of these specific cases, however, individuals are not legitimate refugees and are often traded to Australia for the explicit purpose of being exploited.”

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