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Manal Ezzat was project manager for the Army Corps of Engineers at the Pentagon when 184 people were killed in the 9/11 terrorist attack 18 years ago

A Muslim engineer who fled the Pentagon while it burned during the 9/11 attacks helped rebuild the crash site and turned it into the memorial chapel that exists today.

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Manal Ezzat was project manager for the Army Corps of Engineers at the Pentagon when 184 people were killed in the terror attack 18 years ago.

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly on the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene.

The chapel, which was opened on the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, is now used daily by US military staff of all religions.

Manal Ezzat was project manager for the Army Corps of Engineers at the Pentagon when 184 people were killed in the 9/11 terrorist attack 18 years ago

Manal Ezzat was project manager for the Army Corps of Engineers at the Pentagon when 184 people were killed in the 9/11 terrorist attack 18 years ago

& # 39; There was a lot of emotion built into that effort, & # 39; Ezzat told the Washington Post from making the chapel.

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& # 39; We just wanted to make it a quiet place that could wipe out the tragedy. & # 39;

Ezzat said that she and the design team immediately knew that no one would want to rebuild office space there.

The chapel is located next to the National 9/11 Pentagon Memorial.

Ezzat, who has a PhD in construction engineering, was responsible for designing the interior of the rebuild.

She has been working on a project for many years to renovate the Pentagon when the 9/11 attacks took place.

Ezzat said her previous renovation work, including reinforcing the exterior of the Pentagon, helped 1500 employees flee when the plane crashed in 2001.

They were able to escape before the floors above the crash site collapsed about 20 minutes after the collision.

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene
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Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene

Ezzat said that she and the design team immediately knew that no one would want to rebuild office space there and instead wanted to plan a memorial and a chapel

Ezzat said that she and the design team immediately knew that no one would want to rebuild office space there and instead wanted to plan a memorial and a chapel

Ezzat said that she and the design team immediately knew that no one would want to rebuild office space there and instead wanted to plan a memorial and a chapel

The chapel, which was opened on the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, is now used daily by US military staff of all religions

The chapel, which was opened on the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, is now used daily by US military staff of all religions

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The chapel, which was opened on the first anniversary of the terrorist attacks, is now used daily by US military staff of all religions

Once the redesign was complete, Ezzat said she received a request to be reassigned.

& # 39; When I was working at the Pentagon, I just felt that I was with my second family … It just destroyed me & she said.

& # 39; I had to leave here. The building brought back many bad memories. I just couldn't stay. & # 39;

In a short documentary, which was produced by David Washburn before Loyalty stories, Ezzat said she personally knew a dozen employees who were killed.

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& # 39; I still save their photos & # 39; s with ribbon … until then I cannot open that ribbon, & # 39; she said.

On the day of the terrorist attacks, Ezzat said she was running with everyone while fleeing the Pentagon.

She said her hijab fell off, but a man picked it up and tried to help her put it back on.

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene

Ezzat, who fled the Pentagon so quickly the day her hijab fell, began planning the memorial chapel while the first responders were still extinguishing the scene

184 Pentagon employees died when a hijacked plane crashed into the building on 11 September
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184 Pentagon employees died when a hijacked plane crashed into the building on 11 September

184 Pentagon employees died when a hijacked plane crashed into the building on 11 September

In the aftermath, she said she was afraid of working as a Muslim at the Pentagon.

& # 39; I was angry with what they did with Islam, I was angry with the Muslim community … but above all I was angry with the people who died – for the innocent lives on the plane and for the people who died on the Pentagon, & # 39; she said.

Regarding the redesign and construction of the chapel, Ezzat said that they wanted to create a space for people who experienced the trauma and one who embraced and welcomed all beliefs.

& # 39; It was part of my mission to undertake that project. It just happened that I was a Muslim, but you can imagine I was ecstatic to know that I was part of bringing peace to the building and harmony, & she said.

& # 39; I really like Muslims praying where the attack took place.

& # 39; As you walk around the Pentagon, you will find that all walks of life serve one nation, and the chapel is a symbol of unity. & # 39;

Ezzat has since worked as a program manager for schools of the Ministry of Defense.

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