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Sacrificing children seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in the cultures of ancient Peru. Among the finds that reveal this ritual behavior were the mummified remains of a child's body (photo), discovered in 1985 by a group of mountain climbers

Sacrificing children seems to have been a relatively common phenomenon in the cultures of ancient Peru, including the pre-Incan Sican or Lambayeque culture and the Chimu people who followed them, as well as the Inca itself.

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Among the finds that reveal this ritual behavior are the mummified remains of a child's body, discovered in 1985 by a group of mountain climbers.

The remains were discovered at around 17,388ft (5,300 meters) on the southwestern ridge of Mount Cerro Aconcagua in the Argentinian province of Mendoza.

Sacrificing children seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in the cultures of ancient Peru. Among the finds that reveal this ritual behavior were the mummified remains of a child's body (photo), discovered in 1985 by a group of mountain climbers

Sacrificing children seems to have been a relatively common occurrence in the cultures of ancient Peru. Among the finds that reveal this ritual behavior were the mummified remains of a child's body (photo), discovered in 1985 by a group of mountain climbers

The boy is thought to have been the victim of an Inca ritual called capacocha, in which children of great beauty and health were sacrificed by drugging them and taking them into the mountains to freeze them to death.

Ruins of a sanctuary used by the Inca to offer children to their gods were discovered by archaeologists in a coastal ruin complex in Peru in 2016.

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Experts who dig in Chotuna-Chornancap, in the north of Lima, discovered 17 graves from the 15th century. This included the graves of six children who were placed side by side in pairs of shallow graves.

Capacocha was a ritual that usually took place at the death of an Inca king. The local gentlemen had to select impeccable children who represent the ideal of human perfection.

Ruins of a shrine used by the Inca to sacrifice children to their gods were discovered by archaeologists in 2016 in a coastal ruin complex in Peru. Experts who dig in Chotuna-Chornancap (photo), in the north of Lima, discovered 17 graves from at least the 15th century

Ruins of a shrine used by the Inca to sacrifice children to their gods were discovered by archaeologists in 2016 in a coastal ruin complex in Peru. Experts who dig in Chotuna-Chornancap (photo), in the north of Lima, discovered 17 graves from at least the 15th century

Ruins of a shrine used by the Inca to sacrifice children to their gods were discovered by archaeologists in 2016 in a coastal ruin complex in Peru. Experts who dig in Chotuna-Chornancap (photo), in the north of Lima, discovered 17 graves from at least the 15th century

Children were married and received sets of miniature figures for people and llamas in gold, silver, copper, and shell. The male figures have elongated earlobes and a braided headband and the female figurines wore their hair in braids.

The children were then taken back to their original communities, where they were honored before being sacrificed to the mountain gods on the Llullaillaco volcano.

The expression Capacocha is translated as & # 39; solemn sacrifice & # 39; or & # 39; royal obligation & # 39 ;.

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The reason for this type of sacrificial rituals is typically understood to be the commemoration of important life events of the Inca emperor, to send them to the gods at their death, to stop natural disasters, encourage the growth of crops, or for religious ceremonies.

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