News

Climate change carbon emission 2030 goal by Anthony Albanese: Bills soar, Anthony Albanese’s plan may fail

Why Anthony Albanese’s 2030 climate goal will NOT be reached even if your electricity bill rises by 56 percent

  • Labor, with support from the Greens, has drawn up a plan to reduce carbon emissions
  • The federal government aims to reduce emissions by 43 percent by 2030
  • Department of Climate Change, Energy, Environment and Water skeptical

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

A government department has questioned Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s target to reduce CO2 emissions by 43 percent by 2030.

Labor, backed by the Greens, passed legislation in September to honor its climate change election pledge.

But just three months later, the Department of Climate Change, Energy, Environment and Water has suggested that the plan to cut carbon emissions by 43 percent by 2030, compared to 2005 levels, is unlikely to be met.

The modeling suggested that even with additional measures to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, carbon pollution would only be reduced by 40 percent by 2030.

Without additional policy changes to encourage more renewable energy, carbon emissions would have fallen by 32 percent by 2030.

A Government Department Has Questioned Prime Minister Anthony Albanese'S Target Of Cutting Carbon Emissions By 43 Percent By 2030 (He Is Pictured On The Right In June As Energy Secretary Chris Bowen Signs The Climate Pledge In The Presence Of Trade Union And Business Leaders)

A government department has questioned Prime Minister Anthony Albanese’s target of cutting carbon emissions by 43 percent by 2030 (he is pictured on the right in June as Energy Secretary Chris Bowen signs the climate pledge in the presence of trade union and business leaders)

Climate change targets and likely realities

GOAL 2030: 43 percent reduction in 2030, with CO2 emissions falling to 354 megatons

BASIC FORECAST: 32 percent reduction in 2030 with CO2 emissions falling to 425 megatons without new green policy

ADDITIONAL MEASURES: 40 percent reduction in 2030, with CO2 emissions falling to 371 megatons

This base case factored in new policies to remove import tariffs on electric vehicles, allow officials to drive electric cars, and fund solar batteries for the community.

The department said most of the carbon emissions reduction would be a result of federal and state government programs to boost solar power generation.

“From 2020 to 2030, most of the reduction in emissions will come from the electricity sector due to the strong uptake of renewables supported by federal, state and territory policies,” it said in a statement. report.

Carbon emissions were expected to rise as more Australians used their cars after the end of Covid restrictions and farmers restocked their livestock after the drought.

Data from the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory showed that transportation emissions increased 3.2 percent in the June quarter of 2022.

The department report was more optimistic about reducing carbon emissions after 2030, predicting a reduction of 38 percent by 2035 in a baseline scenario and 48 percent by 2035 with “additional measures.”

Data From The National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Showed Transport Emissions Increased By 3.2 Percent In The June Quarter Of 2022 (Pictured Is A Filling Station In Sydney)

Data From The National Greenhouse Gas Inventory Showed Transport Emissions Increased By 3.2 Percent In The June Quarter Of 2022 (Pictured Is A Filling Station In Sydney)

Data from the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory showed transport emissions increased by 3.2 percent in the June quarter of 2022 (pictured is a filling station in Sydney)

Australia has a goal of reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050, which both sides of the political arena support.

More ambitious renewable energy targets have led energy companies to submit plans to close coal-fired power plants, from Eraring near Newcastle in 2025 to Bayswater in the Hunter Valley in 2033 and the Collie in Western Australia in 2027.

This would reduce the baseload supply of electricity, making higher electricity bills more likely until more homes are connected to renewable energy networks.

Labor went to the election promising to cut average energy bills by $275 by 2025, despite the implications of Russia’s war in Ukraine for global energy markets.

The plan seemed to loosen up in October’s budget, when the Treasury forecast electricity bills would rise 56 percent in 2022 and 2023.

Labour’s ‘Powering Australia’s promises’ were removed from their websites last month.

Before Labor came to power, the Australian Energy Market Operator noted in April that annual wholesale prices had more than doubled to $87 in the March quarter – up 141 percent in a year.

More Ambitious Renewable Energy Targets Have Led Energy Companies To Submit Plans To Close Coal-Fired Power Stations, From Eraring (Pictured) Near Newcastle In 2025 To Bayswater In The Hunter Valley In 2033 And The Collie In Western Australia In 2027

More Ambitious Renewable Energy Targets Have Led Energy Companies To Submit Plans To Close Coal-Fired Power Stations, From Eraring (Pictured) Near Newcastle In 2025 To Bayswater In The Hunter Valley In 2033 And The Collie In Western Australia In 2027

More ambitious renewable energy targets have led energy companies to submit plans to close coal-fired power stations, from Eraring (pictured) near Newcastle in 2025 to Bayswater in the Hunter Valley in 2033 and the Collie in Western Australia in 2027

Show More

Jacky

The author of what'snew2day.com is dedicated to keeping you up-to-date on the latest news and information.

Related Articles

Back to top button