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Britain sneaks back to the pub! Smart landlords find ways to bypass lockdown rules

British pubs may be weeks away from the official reopening after the coronavirus blockage, but savvy homeowners are finding ways to get around the rules of serving pints to thirsty gamblers.

Over the weekend, Brighton saw long lines of visitors queuing for a pint, almost two months after pubs and bars closed to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

But now that lockdowns have eased, companies are serving drinks by serving them in takeaway cups or outside – just in time for the hottest day of the year yet.

Actor Laurence Fox is one of the British to take advantage of the loophole, he was seen on Monday pinting at Primrose Hill, London.

Actor Laurence Fox enjoyed a takeaway pint in Primrose Hill, London on Monday as landlords find ways to get around the lockdown rules

Actor Laurence Fox enjoyed a takeaway pint in Primrose Hill, London on Monday as landlords find ways to get around the lockdown rules

Visitors to Brighton beach are among the thousands across the country who benefit from takeaway food during this week's heat wave

Visitors to Brighton beach are among the thousands across the country who benefit from takeaway food during this week's heat wave

Visitors to Brighton beach are among the thousands across the country who benefit from takeaway food during this week’s heat wave

The Old King's Head in Shoreditch serves takeaway pints to thirsty customers today

The Old King's Head in Shoreditch serves takeaway pints to thirsty customers today

The Old King’s Head in Shoreditch serves takeaway pints to thirsty customers today

Visitors along Brighton Beach can be seen with pints in plastic cups, as gamblers lined up at the Old King’s Head in Shoreditch on Wednesday afternoon for a drink on the hottest day of the year – with temperatures reaching 82F.

The Covid-19 pandemic devastated the hospitality industry after weeks of closing sales plummeted and many companies faced uncertain futures.

UKHospitality, the industry’s trade organization, today submitted a 75-page file containing a roadmap to get restaurants and pubs open on July 4, including throwing out the hotel buffet and no more drinkers at the bar.

The file was submitted, according to the ministers The Daily Telegraph.

Boris Johnson unveiled his blueprint for the shutdown last Sunday after the British spent weeks under draconian shutdown measures imposed by the Prime Minister on March 23.

The Prime Minister has urged people to return to work and hopes that schools and shops will open again from 1 June.

He also said it is his “ambition” to open a number of hospitality businesses on July 4 as the prime minister tries to kickstart the economy.

The recently released design plans give a glimpse of how restaurants, bars and other leisure facilities will work as the country comes out of the lockout, and suggest how to operate safely during the coronavirus pandemic.

The sector has been devastated by the health crisis, with declining sales and many companies still doubt whether reopening with social distance rules will be financially viable.

If the pub gardens are open to take advantage of the summer weather, patrols may need to take place to ensure that large groups do not gather and that social distance is maintained.

Takeaways are the best Brighton gamblers can get today, but the hospitality industry hopes pubs and restaurants will open on July 4 with new social distance measures

Takeaways are the best Brighton gamblers can get today, but the hospitality industry hopes pubs and restaurants will open on July 4 with new social distance measures

Takeaways are the best Brighton gamblers can get today, but the hospitality industry hopes pubs and restaurants will open on July 4 with new social distance measures

There were long lines for a beer in Brighton on Sunday

There were long lines for a beer in Brighton on Sunday

There were long lines for a beer in Brighton on Sunday

Instead of being able to grab a bottle of ketchup or mustard, individually wrapped herbs are encouraged instead.

Any use of a menu should be limited and cleaned by an employee after use.

The file released today explained how drinkers are discouraged from queuing at bars while encouraging table service.

Tape on the floor provides guidelines for social distance.

Other options that pubs can consider are having customers order from one to another, then picking up drinks from a separate pick-up point.

When leaving the pub or having a drink, many people take their empty glasses back to the bar so that the staff do not have to pick them up.

As the R rate drops, more companies will be able to reopen, Boris Johnson explained on May 10

As the R rate drops, more companies will be able to reopen, Boris Johnson explained on May 10

As the R rate drops, more companies will be able to reopen, Boris Johnson explained on May 10

But the document states that the glasses should now be picked up by the staff.

Pubs will also need to draw up a restroom plan to ensure they don’t get overcrowded.

Earlier this month, to simplify locking measures, Mr. Johnson said that some parts of the hospitality industry could be reopened “at the earliest” in July, if coronavirus infections fall to a safe level.

The Prime Minister said on May 10, “If and only if the numbers support it, we will hope to reopen at least some of the hospitality and other public places, provided they are safe and enforce social distance.”

A gentleman picks up a few cold beers in Bournemouth at a bar where they pick up beer

A gentleman picks up a few cold beers in Bournemouth at a bar where they pick up beer

A gentleman picks up a few cold beers in Bournemouth at a bar where they pick up beer

Young people line up at a bar in Bournemouth to have a beer in warm and sunny weather

Young people line up at a bar in Bournemouth to have a beer in warm and sunny weather

Young people line up at a bar in Bournemouth to have a beer in warm and sunny weather

Buildings are allowed to provide pick-up services during closure in an effort to keep businesses afloat.

A Whitehall source said The Telegraph that engaging in outdoor activities could mean a “more vibrant style of continental urban centers in the summer.”

Professor Alan Penn, a member of SAGE, the government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies, assured those who venture outside that the risk of contracting the virus outdoors is lower.

He said, “Science suggests that being outdoors in sunlight, with good ventilation, are both very protective against transmission of the virus.”

Pub home owners, including The Gate House in Highgate, have found creative ways to continue serving the locals as closing measures begin to diminish

Pub home owners, including The Gate House in Highgate, have found creative ways to continue serving the locals as closing measures begin to diminish

Pub home owners, including The Gate House in Highgate, have found creative ways to continue serving the locals as closing measures begin to diminish

Other scientists say they ‘totally agree’ with Professor Penn and argue for spending more time outdoors, where the virus is less likely to survive.

Earlier today, it was revealed that 1,500 English primary schools are expected to remain closed in 12 days, despite millions of children staying at home for more than eight weeks.

At least 13 mostly Labor councils refused to reopen schools on June 1, a date Boris Johnson determined that some students would return after weeks of detention.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland admitted this morning that the June 1 reopening date is now not ‘uniform’ across England – as the Prime Minister’s promise fell into chaosdisagreement between the middle of the school, unions and municipalities.

Mr Buckland told the BBC, “I don’t think any of us want to endanger children or our dedicated teaching staff, and the issue of safety is clearly paramount.

“So we are all working towards June 1 and are planning for that return, but I accept the point that there may be employers’ issues that need to be addressed, which may not mean that we will see a unified approach on June 1.

The 75-page report on the hospitality industry provides a step-by-step plan to open restaurants and pubs on July 4

The hospitality industry has submitted a 75-page report with a roadmap to get restaurants and pubs open on July 4, including throwing out the hotel buffet and no more drinkers at the bar.

The file was presented to ministers by UKHospitality, the industry trade association, as reported by The Daily Telegraph.

Boris Johnson unveiled his lockdown blueprint last Sunday after the British spent weeks under draconian lockdown measures imposed by the prime minister on March 23.

The Prime Minister has urged people to return to work and hopes that schools and shops will open again from 1 June.

He also said it is his “ambition” to open a number of hospitality businesses on July 4 as the prime minister tries to kickstart the economy.

The recently released design plans give a glimpse of how restaurants, bars and other leisure facilities will work as the country comes out of the lockout, and suggest how to operate safely during the coronavirus pandemic.

The sector has been devastated by the health crisis, with declining sales and many companies still doubt whether reopening with social distance rules will be financially viable.

This photo shows a Wetherpoon pub in South London when it was still open. The graphs show what could happen if the pubs reopen in July

This photo shows a Wetherpoon pub in South London when it was still open. The graphs show what could happen if the pubs reopen in July

This photo shows a Wetherpoon pub in South London when it was still open. The graphs show what could happen if the pubs reopen in July

Pubs and restaurants

In pubs and restaurants, salt and pepper shakers are removed from tables and instead brought to customers along with cutlery, rather than being on the table when you sit down.

Drinkers are also discouraged from lining up at the bar and table service is encouraged.

To prevent people from disregarding social distance guidelines, there will be tape on the floor indicating the required distance.

Other options that pubs can consider are having customers order from one to another, then picking up drinks from a separate pick-up point.

When leaving the pub or having a drink, many people take their empty glasses back to the bar so that the staff do not have to pick them up.

But the document states that the glasses should now be picked up by the staff.

Pubs will also need to draw up a restroom plan to ensure they don’t get overcrowded.

Drinkers are pictured at JJ Moon's in Tooting, South London, on March 20, the last day Wetherspoon opened nationwide

Drinkers are pictured at JJ Moon's in Tooting, South London, on March 20, the last day Wetherspoon opened nationwide

Drinkers are pictured at JJ Moon’s in Tooting, South London, on March 20, the last day Wetherspoon opened nationwide

If the pub gardens are open to take advantage of the summer weather, patrols may need to take place to ensure that large groups do not gather and that social distance is maintained.

Instead of being able to grab a bottle of ketchup or mustard, individually wrapped herbs are encouraged instead.

Any use of a menu should be limited and cleaned by an employee after use.

Wetherspoon Chairman Tim Martin previously said he hoped to reopen pubs and hotels “in or around June.”

He was forced to close all 900 pubs and fire 40,000 workers before Britain shut down.

The 64-year-old said, “Now if someone would give me the chance to have it under surveillance conditions, I think I would probably take it because your chances are very, very good.”

He told Sky at the time: “Supermarkets are very busy. Pubs are much less busy.

“In pubs, the virus has hardly been transmitted and I think it is an exaggeration to close them. That is a commercial view but also a healthy view. ‘

He claimed that a nationwide closure was “draconian” and offered no “health benefits.”

Mr Martin had hoped that he could get away with introducing social distance into his pubs, with “regulars only” policies in some countries.

An empty beer garden at the Greene King Stag and Hounds pub in Farnham Common during the coronavirus shutdown

An empty beer garden at the Greene King Stag and Hounds pub in Farnham Common during the coronavirus shutdown

An empty beer garden at the Greene King Stag and Hounds pub in Farnham Common during the coronavirus shutdown

He said people would be more likely to keep their distance if the number of visitors dropped and some couldn’t leave the house due to underlying health issues.

Rival pub chain Greene King has previously said it wants to open beer gardens and customers can order via an app.

Chief executive Nick McKenzie said that customers should not enter the pub to abide by social distance guidelines.

British Beer and Pub Association CEO Emma McClarkin said earlier: ‘The July reopening will be great for those pubs that can meet social distance measures by then.

“We are ready to work with the government to help reopen pubs in a safe and financially viable manner as soon as possible.”

Environment Minister George Eustice hopes that pubs can return in the short term if they adhere to the social distance guidelines.

Mr. Eustice said to the Commons, “Of course, we also recognize that until things return to something closer to normal and they can open normally, hopefully later this summer, it won’t give them all the trade they had before.”

Hotels

A warm handshake from a hotel owner or host of a bed & breakfast may be a thing of the past.

Instead, staff are encouraged to greet guests in a manner that adheres to social distance guidelines.

At hotels, hotel buffets will be strongly discouraged, meaning self-service breakfast will be discontinued in thousands of hotels across the country.

Guests who wish to use the gym or spa facilities are encouraged to use their rooms to avoid overcrowding in locker rooms.

Similar food and drink rules apply to hotels, as do restaurants and bars.

In the area of ​​room service, staff are encouraged to knock on the door and leave the tray outside rather than talking to the customer.

Room keys should also be disinfected regularly, and staff should maintain a social distance when helping guests with luggage.

There is no queue and table service or apps are prioritized to ensure social distance.

Any outdoor areas should be monitored regularly and queues at the counters managed.

The hotel sector, like many other operators, has been severely affected. Some of them are now housing homeless people during the pandemic.

Keith Barr, CEO of IHG, owner of the Crowne Plaza and Holiday Inn brands, said hotels should make “visible” changes to hygiene standards to encourage customers to return.

He also said the company tried electrostatic nozzles and removed standard chambers, such as pen and paper.

Coronavirus patients with mild symptoms are quarantined in Tokyo hotels that are manned by robots. Five hotels in the city use robots to limit the spread, one of which is the world's first social humanoid pepper (left)

Coronavirus patients with mild symptoms are quarantined in Tokyo hotels that are manned by robots. Five hotels in the city use robots to limit the spread, one of which is the world's first social humanoid pepper (left)

Coronavirus patients with mild symptoms are quarantined in Tokyo hotels that are manned by robots. Five hotels in the city use robots to limit the spread, one of which is the world’s first social humanoid pepper (left)

Mr. Barr told the Financial Times, “Covid-19 is the biggest challenge both IHG and our industry have ever faced,” he said after the company’s first quarter update on Thursday.

This week, other industry bosses also spoke about the importance of hygiene standards in attracting customers back to an industry that has seen a massive drop in sales.

Speaking at an industry event early this week, the director of Radisson Hotel Group Federico J González said industry should have a common approach to cleaning and hygiene.

During a panel session as part of a virtual In Sync event, he said, “Giving the consumer a common reference is one of the things we will pay if the industry doesn’t.

“Stars don’t mean anything to today’s consumer, because each region has classified it differently … [they need] a reference they really understand. ‘

And David Kong of BWH Hotel Group said that cleanliness becomes “the most important element of why anyone would choose a hotel,” as reported by The Caterer.

Theme parks

At theme parks, capacity on roller coasters and other attractions can be reduced by leaving center seats empty when visitors from different groups ride.

Amusement parks and other family entertainment sites may be forced to cancel character programs, concerts and end-of-day parades to comply with potential social distance rules.

Queues for specific journeys will have to comply with social distance measures, which means that there may be less capacity for certain journeys.

Getting food and drinks from the various eateries at an attraction will also have to comply with the social distance guidelines.

In an update for guests this week, Alton Towers said it was advised by amusement parks around the world on when to open safely.

In a statement on Monday, the resort said: ‘Since the resort closed, we have worked tirelessly to ensure that when it is safe to reopen, we are absolutely ready to welcome you back.

“We have sought advice from colleagues around the world on the best reopening in accordance with new safety guidelines.

“From improved cleaning regimes to social distance measures, we will do everything we can to ensure you have a brilliant, safe visit.

Shanghai Disneyland sets up social distance queues for the attraction to reopen

Shanghai Disneyland sets up social distance queues for the attraction to reopen

Shanghai Disneyland sets up social distance queues for the attraction to reopen

“We will soon share our plans for reopening. For now, we ask guests with short breaks booked on June 1 and July 3 to visit altontowers.com to find out how to move your booking.

“In our 40th anniversary season, we are committed to being here for you and your families, with fun, excitement and fantastic memories, as we have been doing for decades and will continue to do so.

Please keep smiling, clapping and supporting each other. Bye.’

Kate Nicholls, the body’s chief executive, told the newspaper: “We will be ready to restart on July 4 in England, and other parts of the country when allowed, but it is vital that the reopening is properly and happens at the right time and with the right support – so our industry can help bring employees, customers and communities back together safely in the coming months.

“Summer is a crucial moment for the sector. The general British public deserves safe accommodation, food and drink experiences, holidays and leisure; the financial costs are a justified investment in the welfare of our country and the future of the economy. ‘

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