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The Chief Science Officer for WW suggested that you should never raise the weight of a loved one unless they did that first, regardless of how good your intentions are (stock image)

Do you have to tell a loved one that they are fat? According to experts, there is & # 39; no benefit & # 39; in expressing your worries and even warning that people can lose weight

  • WW & # 39; s Chief Science Officer refused the belief that vetshaming would benefit weight loss
  • Gary Foster, from Philadelphia, said the & # 39; could stand in the way of the journey & # 39;
  • He praised the importance of body positivity & # 39; motivating & # 39; and & # 39; energize & # 39;
  • Also suggested that you should never raise the size of your loved one if they are too heavy
  • Said: & # 39; I have never heard that conversion goes well when a loved one brings it up. & # 39;
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If a friend or family member is overweight and worried about their health, is it a good idea to tell them, no matter how difficult the conversation is?

It is certainly a difficult dilemma, but now an expert has revealed why it can be counterproductive to say something, no matter how good your intentions are.

Speaking teen FEMAIL, Gary Foster from Philadelphia, the Chief Science Officer at WW (formerly Weight Watchers) said you should never be the first to raise the size of a loved one if they are overweight

He revealed: & # 39; Let the person take the lead – they must have the conversation. I have never heard that conversion goes well when a loved one brings it up.

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& # 39; I think it is highly unlikely that someone struggling with their weight will not know.

& # 39; It makes no sense to say: & # 39; You are really overweight and I'm worried about your & # 39;. & # 39;

The Chief Science Officer for WW suggested that you should never raise the weight of a loved one unless they did that first, regardless of how good your intentions are (stock image)

The Chief Science Officer for WW suggested that you should never raise the weight of a loved one unless they did that first, regardless of how good your intentions are (stock image)

He explained: & # 39; Let's assume that family members are concerned about others. Let us also assume that the person is accurately aware of his body weight, and I think it is actually a bad exercise, a useless exercise. & # 39;

Instead of increasing someone's weight, he said that people should listen to a signal from the person & # 39; to open up.

He suggested: & # 39; I think it makes perfect sense to say "I'm really unhappy with my weight" to answer "Tell me more".

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& # 39; Provide support that is requested – it is important to know what is useful to the friend and not what is useful to you. & # 39;

The Chief Science Officer suggested that & # 39; hard love doesn't help & # 39;

The Chief Science Officer suggested that & # 39; hard love doesn't help & # 39;

The Chief Science Officer suggested that & # 39; hard love doesn't help & # 39;

He added: & # 39; It sounds counter-intuitive because people want to help – but it is not something the person is not aware of. & # 39;

Gary went on: & # 39; Let the person take the lead – they must have the conversation. I have never heard that conversion goes well when a loved one brings it up. & # 39;

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& # 39; Tough love doesn't help – it hurts emotionally and stands in the way of the journey. & # 39;

Likewise, he maintained that fat-shaming by strangers is just as useless when it comes to the decision to lose weight.

Personal trainer Dani Levy made headlines in September because she argued that fat shaming is an effective way to encourage people to sell off the pound.

But Gary countered the idea and suggested that it was a common – though misleading – assumption that fat-shaming encourages people to take action.

Gary & # 39; s comments contrast sharply with those of fitness instructor Danielle Levy, who came in the news in September after he claimed that vetshaming helped people lose weight

Gary & # 39; s comments contrast sharply with those of fitness instructor Danielle Levy, who came in the news in September after he claimed that vetshaming helped people lose weight

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Gary & # 39; s comments contrast sharply with those of fitness instructor Danielle Levy, who came in the news in September after he claimed that vetshaming helped people lose weight

He said: & (39) (People say) we should not accommodate large people, we should make aircraft seats smaller, we should make it uncomfortable for people, make it difficult for people, make them feel the pain … As if they do not know that it is uncomfortable to go up the stairs, or that it is sometimes difficult to walk around. & # 39;

& # 39; If someone says you are grotesque, you are fat, you are despicable, you are lazy, you are undisciplined, you would think that it is motivating. It is not that, it is demotivating. & # 39;

He added: & # 39; If you are too critical for yourself, it is also not useful. It takes you to a darker place because you say that there is a fundamental flaw in character. & # 39;

Instead, he praised the movement of body positivity to help people accept and love their bodies.

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He further said that those who appreciated themselves & # 39; more energy & # 39; had on their & # 39; weight management & # 39; trip.

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) femail