Woman, 70, falls 200ft until her death in Grand Canyon National Park – the second person this month

A man who died after falling over the edge of the South Rim of the Grand Canyon earlier this month was revealed – a few hours after a 70-year-old woman had undergone the same fate in the national park.

Michael Obritsch, 67, plunged deep into the gorge on 3 April when he lost his foot on the east side of the Yavapai Geological Museum.

Park Rangers later discovered that his body fell more than 400 feet.

From Santa Rosa, California, the death of the retired computer analyst was described as a & # 39; tragic accident & # 39; by his family.

Michael Obritsch, 67, plunged three hundred meters above the rim of the Grand Canyon on 3 April. His family described his death as a & # 39; tragic accident & # 39;

Michael Obritsch, 67, plunged three hundred meters above the rim of the Grand Canyon on 3 April. His family described his death as a & # 39; tragic accident & # 39;

A rescuer on the outskirts takes a break when the park helicopter moves to align the body of the 67-year-old Obritsch

A rescuer on the outskirts takes a break when the park helicopter moves to align the body of the 67-year-old Obritsch

A rescuer on the outskirts takes a break when the park helicopter moves to align the body of the 67-year-old Obritsch

& # 39; His warm, friendly personality, intelligence, dedication, kindness and his sense of pleasure will be greatly missed, & # 39; family members said in his death notice.

Ron Touchstone, who had been friends with Obritsch for more than 20 years, described him as a & # 39; great guy & # 39 ;.

& # 39; Knowing him was loving him & # 39 ;, Touchstone told the press democrat. & # 39; He was the best read man I have ever met. & # 39;

Yesterday, a 70-year-old woman suffered a similar fate to Obritsch when she fell 200 feet to her death before rescuers could reach her.

Park Rangers say they responded yesterday to reports from a person in need of help near Pipe Creek Vista – a place that often bustles with tourists taking photos – in the park's South Rim.

The older woman, however, fell off the edge & # 39; before a rescue effort could be undertaken & # 39 ;.

As a retired computer analyst, Obritsch lost his foot somewhere east of the Yavapai Geological Museum and fell over the edge of the gorge

As a retired computer analyst, Obritsch lost his foot somewhere east of the Yavapai Geological Museum and fell over the edge of the gorge

As a retired computer analyst, Obritsch lost his foot somewhere east of the Yavapai Geological Museum and fell over the edge of the gorge

Her tragic fall came near the popular tourist viewing spot Pipe Creek Vista (image: a tourist takes a risky position at the same location near where the woman would have died on Tuesday)

Her tragic fall came near the popular tourist viewing spot Pipe Creek Vista (image: a tourist takes a risky position at the same location near where the woman would have died on Tuesday)

Her tragic fall came near the popular tourist viewing spot Pipe Creek Vista (image: a tourist takes a risky position at the same location near where the woman would have died on Tuesday)

Authorities say they deviated 300 feet from a path along the South Rim, about a mile and a half east of Mather Point, before they plummeted down to the gorge.

She fell somewhere between Mather Point and the starting point for the South Kaibab Trail – two of the most visited locations in the South Rim.

A team of 15 people worked to restore the remains of the woman, whose name is currently withheld from the authorities, until her relatives can be informed of her death. The hometown of the woman has also not been revealed.

The National Park Service and the Coconino County Medical Examiner are investigating the death of women.

Her death became the third in a series of tragic traps in the reserve since March 26. All deaths are still being investigated by the two bodies.

The 70-year-old woman became the second excessive death in the Grand Canyon National Park (shown) this month - and the third in recent weeks

The 70-year-old woman became the second excessive death in the Grand Canyon National Park (shown) this month - and the third in recent weeks

The 70-year-old woman became the second excessive death in the Grand Canyon National Park (shown) this month – and the third in recent weeks

Her body appeared to have fallen more than 200 feet from somewhere near Pike Creek Vista (pictured). The woman has not yet been identified, while the next of kin are aware

Her body appeared to have fallen more than 200 feet from somewhere near Pike Creek Vista (pictured). The woman has not yet been identified, while the next of kin are aware

Her body appeared to have fallen more than 200 feet from somewhere near Pike Creek Vista (pictured). The woman has not yet been identified, while the next of kin are aware

On March 28, a tourist from Macau, China, tried to take a photo at the Eagle Point of Grand Canyon West when he stumbled and fell to his death.

The body of a Japanese tourist was also found on March 26 in the wooden section of the southern Grand Canyon Village. Authorities say they don't believe he died due to a fall.

For comparison: in 2018 only one man died as a result of a fall in the park. The man, from Illinois, climbed over the railing at Mather Point and fell 500 meters lower.

& # 39; Park staff encourages all visitors to stay safe by staying on designated paths and footpaths, always keeping a safe distance from the edge of the edge and behind bars and fences when looking out, & # 39; said the National Park Service in a statement on Tuesday.

According to the Grand Canyon Officials, 17 people died at the park last year, with death attributed to a number of causes, including accidental falls, heat exhaustion, and drowning on the Colorado River during white water rafting.

Tuesday's death is being treated as an accident, officials say.

The park was first established in 1919 and is considered one of the most popular tourist destinations in the US, with nearly 6.4 million visitors a year.