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Jessica Tuffield, 23, from Kent, survived sepsis twice in six months after claiming that she was initially sent home by doctors

A woman survived sepsis twice in six months after she claimed she was initially sent back to the hospital by doctors.

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Jessica Tuffield, 23, from Kent, first visited her doctor in March 2016 after suffering from lethargy for two weeks, a characteristic symptom of the life-threatening condition.

She had suddenly become so sick that her vision was blurred while driving and her temperature and blood pressure were high.

Mrs. Tuffield was referred to Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. But after eight hours she claims that she was fired without a confirmed diagnosis, although doctors suspected they had the killer problems.

The Honda sales employee got so sick at home that she constantly vomited and could barely raise her head.

Her mother made an alarm by calling 111, and according to Mrs. Tuffield, the ambulance brothers were shocked that she had been sent home.

Mrs. Tuffield spent about two weeks in the hospital in the fight against sepsis, but said she did not blame doctors for missing her symptoms because they are notoriously difficult to recognize.

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Ms. Tuffield was again knocked down with sepsis six months later in November 2016, after having seen the signs of the & # 39; silent killer & # 39; could have recognized. She was immediately treated with antibiotics.

Jessica Tuffield, 23, from Kent, survived sepsis twice in six months after claiming that she was initially sent home by doctors

Jessica Tuffield, 23, from Kent, survived sepsis twice in six months after claiming that she was initially sent home by doctors

Mrs. Tuffield was rushed to Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. But after eight hours she claims that she was sent home. Her mother made an alarm by calling 111, and according to Mrs. Tuffield, the ambulance brothers were shocked that she had been sent home

Mrs. Tuffield was rushed to Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. But after eight hours she claims that she was sent home. Her mother made an alarm by calling 111, and according to Mrs. Tuffield, the ambulance brothers were shocked that she had been sent home

Mrs. Tuffield was rushed to Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford. But after eight hours she claims that she was sent home. Her mother made an alarm by calling 111, and according to Mrs. Tuffield, the ambulance brothers were shocked that she had been sent home

NHS England has issued new guidelines for all hospitals in April and is threatening them with fines if they do not recognize and treat sepsis.

Employees of emergency departments are required to inform senior doctors of patients who probably have the condition within an hour.

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The move was made to hold hospitals responsible for poor sepsis care and to reduce the number of deaths in the UK – 52,000 a year.

The symptoms of Seps include rapid breathing, abnormally high or low temperature, spotted skin and dizziness or fainting. Without rapid antibiotics, the condition can lead to multiple organ failure and death.

Ms. Tuffield has made it her mission to raise awareness of the potentially fatal disease by working with national charities such as The UK Sepsis Trust – which she has raised £ 5,339 to date.

In memory of the day she was sent home from the hospital, Mrs. Tuffield said: “I was exhausted from the traumatic day I had.

& # 39; After returning home I started to get worse, I became extremely listless, and I couldn't keep my head up and kept vomiting all the time.

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& # 39; My mother contacted 111 and within ten minutes we had two paramedics at our home, who were very concerned that I was sent home with sepsis.

& # 39; They brought me straight back to the hospital; if it wasn't for my mother, I wouldn't be here today. I owe my life to my parents. & # 39;

Mrs. Tuffield initially rejected how she felt in March 2016 because she was suffering from a breast infection.

But within two weeks she started getting uncontrollable nosebleeds – roughly ten a day – which was not normal for her.

Nasal bleeding is not a bullet of sepsis, but according to UK Sepsis Trust the symptoms vary widely from patient to patient.

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Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; The day before my doctor brought me to the hospital, I drove to work myself in the early hours of the morning and I felt really exhausted and I felt that I was not well .

& # 39; I remember driving and hurting my eyes and blurring my vision. & # 39;

Mrs. Tuffield stopped the car, stiffened with fear of losing her eyesight, but managed to find a job.

She said: & # 39; Within half an hour after work, I had crashed into the back of the office space and could not remove my sunglasses from my eyes because of the bright light.

& # 39; My head was in so much pain. My colleague dropped me off at my friend's house and slept all day hoping that I would feel better if I woke up. I was wrong. & # 39;

Mrs. Tuffield, pictured during an event, was scared when the doctor suggested she get sepsis because she had never heard of the condition - also known as blood poisoning
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Mrs. Tuffield, pictured during an event, was scared when the doctor suggested she get sepsis because she had never heard of the condition - also known as blood poisoning

Mrs. Tuffield, pictured during an event, was scared when the doctor suggested she get sepsis because she had never heard of the condition – also known as blood poisoning

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; If I hadn't been there, I wouldn't be here today. I owe my life to my parents & # 39 ;. Depicted with her family, including her mother and father

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; If I hadn't been there, I wouldn't be here today. I owe my life to my parents & # 39 ;. Depicted with her family, including her mother and father

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; If I hadn't been there, I wouldn't be here today. I owe my life to my parents & # 39 ;. Depicted with her family, including her mother and father

Mrs. Tuffield initially rejected how she felt in March 2016 because she was suffering from a breast infection. Suggested at the hospital having treatment

Mrs. Tuffield initially rejected how she felt in March 2016 because she was suffering from a breast infection. Suggested at the hospital having treatment

Mrs. Tuffield initially rejected how she felt in March 2016 because she was suffering from a breast infection. Suggested at the hospital having treatment

Mrs. Tuffield asked to see her doctor urgently after being pulled into her car with blurred vision

Mrs. Tuffield asked to see her doctor urgently after being pulled into her car with blurred vision

Mrs. Tuffield asked to see her doctor urgently after being pulled into her car with blurred vision

HOSPITALS COULD RESULT IN SANCTIONS IF THERE WERE NO SEPSIS

Hospitals can be fined for not recognizing and treating the & # 39; silent killer & # 39; spsis, according to guidelines imposed by NHS England in March.

The personnel of the accident must be extra vigilant for symptoms of the life-threatening complication of patients in emergency room and departments.

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Junior doctors were also told to tell consultants whether patients diagnosed with sepsis did not respond to medication within an hour as part of the move.

The move was part of an effort to speed up the diagnosis and treatment of patients who arrived at A&E with suspected sepsis and other killers such as heart attacks and strokes.

The guidelines, which came into force from April 1, came after a handful of hospitals were criticized for not preventing the death of sepsis.

Guidelines were drawn up by NHS England with the Royal College of Physicians, the Royal College of GPs, the health watchdog NICE and the UK Sepsis Trust.

Dr. Tim Nutbeam, from the UK Sepsis Trust, said: & # 39; We have been working with NHS England over the past three years to improve the recognition and management of sepsis in hospitals. & # 39;

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The next morning, Mrs. Tuffield gave her doctor an operation and immediately begged her to be seen by her doctor.

She was immediately referred to her nearest hospital, Darent Valley Hospital in Dartford, where she stayed for eight hours.

Mrs. Tuffield's symptoms, including high temperature and low blood pressure, which made her heart beat faster, were suspected of being caused by sepsis by both her doctor and hospital staff, she said.

Mrs. Tuffield said: “Looking back, I remember my heart racing and panicking, first because I didn't know what sepsis was and I wasn't sure why my doctor looked so serious.

& # 39; Second, because I wanted to contact my parents and my partner, but they simply didn't have the time or energy. & # 39;

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Cannulas – those are thin tubes that administer medication – were inserted into the veins of both her arms.

But for unknown reasons, Mrs. Tuffield claims that she was sent home later that evening. Her health declined rapidly.

She said: & # 39; That evening I was sent home from the hospital after being there for eight hours. My arms were bruised from the cannulas placed in both of my arms. & # 39;

Mrs. Tuffield claims that she could not hold her head because of her low energy level and constantly vomit.

Mrs. Tuffield suffers from bloody noses ten times a day for ten weeks in the run-up to her rush to the hospital. Pictured with her boyfriend, Sam

Mrs. Tuffield suffers from bloody noses ten times a day for ten weeks in the run-up to her rush to the hospital. Pictured with her boyfriend, Sam

Mrs. Tuffield suffers from bloody noses ten times a day for ten weeks in the run-up to her rush to the hospital. Pictured with her boyfriend, Sam

Mrs. Tuffield's symptoms, including high temperature and low blood pressure, which made her heart beat faster, were probably caused by her family's sepsis. Pictured being treated at the hospital

Mrs. Tuffield's symptoms, including high temperature and low blood pressure, which made her heart beat faster, were probably caused by her family's sepsis. Pictured being treated at the hospital

Mrs. Tuffield's symptoms, including high temperature and low blood pressure, which made her heart beat faster, were probably caused by her family's sepsis. Pictured being treated at the hospital

As her immune system became weaker, Mrs. Tuffield got another sepsis six months after she first survived. Depicted with her father wearing her charity Charity 2019

As her immune system became weaker, Mrs. Tuffield got another sepsis six months after she first survived. Depicted with her father wearing her charity Charity 2019

As her immune system became weaker, Mrs. Tuffield got another sepsis six months after she first survived. Depicted with her father wearing her charity Charity 2019

Her mother called 111 and within two minutes two paramedics arrived at their home.

They were shocked that she had been sent home from the hospital, so they rush her back to the hospital where she was treated on an intravenous line for sepsis.

There are around 250,000 cases of sepsis every year in the UK, according to the UK Sepsis Trust.

Sepsis is the overreaction of the immune system to an infection or injury. Mrs Tuffield's sepsis was later found to be caused by an infection of the breast.

She stayed in the hospital for another week and a half where she was treated with an infusion.

As her immune system became weaker, she got sepsis again six months later in November 2016, although it is unclear what the cause was.

Data show that some relatives in the following year after treatment for sepsis are more susceptible to contracting a new infection. If there is an infection, there is a risk of sepsis.

Because Mrs. Tuffield was able to recognize the symptoms so quickly, she was treated with antibiotics.

Mrs. Tuffield was in hospital for a few weeks recovering from sepsis. She became ill again six months later with the complication and was treated with antibiotics. Collect money shown

Mrs. Tuffield was in hospital for a few weeks recovering from sepsis. She became ill again six months later with the complication and was treated with antibiotics. Collect money shown

Mrs. Tuffield was in hospital for a few weeks recovering from sepsis. She became ill again six months later with the complication and was treated with antibiotics. Collect money shown

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; I have learned that there is nothing more precious than life & # 39 ;. She has made it her mission to raise awareness of sepsis with charities, such as the UK Sepsis Trust - which she has raised £ 5,339 so far (photo, with a charity check)

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; I have learned that there is nothing more precious than life & # 39 ;. She has made it her mission to raise awareness of sepsis with charities, such as the UK Sepsis Trust - which she has raised £ 5,339 so far (photo, with a charity check)

Mrs. Tuffield said: & # 39; I have learned that there is nothing more precious than life & # 39 ;. She has made it her mission to raise awareness of sepsis with charities, such as the UK Sepsis Trust – which she has raised £ 5,339 so far (photo, with a charity check)

The condition is known as the silent killer because it is notoriously difficult to diagnose and significantly increases the risk of death of patients for every hour that they do not receive antibiotics.

Employees are told to be extra vigilant for symptoms of the condition in patients, after criticism has recently been voiced in a number of hospitals for not preventing sepsis deaths.

Guidelines that came into effect on April 1 have been drawn up by NHS England with the Royal College of Physicians, the Royal College of GPs, the health watchdog NICE and the UK Sepsis Trust.

Ms. Tuffield has studied fundraising and has been named Miss Charity London 2019, and has also become a semi-finalist for Miss England.

Mrs. Tuffield said: “Having sepsis and being a survivor has changed my view of my health and lifestyle one hundred percent.

& # 39; I have learned that there is nothing more precious than life and not only from my own experience, but also from the other stories I have been told by people who are not so lucky that it is important to take every day as it comes and never leave it behind if you don't feel well.

& # 39; The most important thing is that sepsis affects everyone differently and we all have different symptoms; the most important question we should ask is, "Could it be sepsis?"

WHAT IS SEPSIS?

Sepsis occurs when the body responds to an infection by attacking its own organs and tissues.

About 44,000 people die of sepsis in the UK every year. Someone worldwide dies of the condition every 3.5 seconds.

Sepsis has symptoms similar to flu, gastroenteritis and an infection of the breast.

Among which:

  • Sunclear speech or confusion
  • Extreme shivering or muscle pain
  • Pno urine in a day
  • Salways shortness of breath
  • IIt feels like you're dying
  • Srelated or discolored

Symptoms in children are:

  • Fast breathing
  • Fits or convulsions
  • Spotted, bluish or pale skin
  • Rashes that do not fade when pressed
  • idleness
  • Feeling abnormally cold

Among the five can be repeatedly surrendered, do not feed or do not pee for 12 hours.

Anyone can develop sepsis, but it is most common in people who have recently had surgery, have had a urinary catheter, or have been in hospital for a long time.

Other risk makers are people with a weak immune system, chemotherapy patients, pregnant women, the elderly and very young people.

The treatment varies depending on the site of the infection, but includes antibiotics, IV fluids and oxygen if necessary.

Source: UK Sepsis Trust and NHS Choices

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