Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Why Australians embrace big four-wheel drives that can pull like the Toyota LandCruiser

Australians embrace large four-wheel drives that can tow a boat or caravan, as overseas travel bans spark interest in road trips.

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic, vehicle sales are rising among most Australian bestsellers, new data from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries shows.

Toyota LandCruiser sales rose 23.3 percent in June, compared to the same month last year, to be Australia’s fourth most popular vehicle.

The Toyota HiLux ute cemented its place as Australia’s best-selling bestseller with comparable store sales growth of 21.1 percent.

Another big Toyota, the Prado 4WD, saw a 16.1 percent rebound in sales.

Motorist Toby Hagon, the editor of EV Centralsaid the ban on sea travel meant that more motorists wanted a large four-wheel drive with towing power so they could explore Australia.

Toyota LandCruiser sales in June were up 23.3 percent, compared to the same month last year, to be Australia's fourth most popular vehicle

Toyota LandCruiser sales in June were up 23.3 percent, compared to the same month last year, to be Australia’s fourth most popular vehicle

“There is certainly more interest in those larger four-wheel drives, in part because some people are now planning that big trip more intensively than many years ago,” he told Daily Mail Australia.

Some people who may have been on holiday abroad or may have a cruise now decide that they will spend their time elsewhere and eventually buy that big four wheel drive to take the bug out of the system and go for the big trip . ‘

Large four-wheel drives also have more towing power than cars.

“Australians love towing, we have one of the fastest towing speeds in the world and LandCruiser has a towing capacity of three and a half tons, so it has the maximum towing capacity an ordinary passenger vehicle can have,” said Mr. Hagon.

“A lot of people go there.”

Motorists weren’t too keen on some smaller SUVs, however, with Mazda CX-5 sales dropping 13.1 percent as demand for the Hyundai Tucson fell by 5.9 percent.

The Toyota HiLux ute solidified its place as Australia's best-selling bestseller, up 21.1 percent

The Toyota HiLux ute solidified its place as Australia's best-selling bestseller, up 21.1 percent

The Toyota HiLux ute solidified its place as Australia’s best-selling bestseller, up 21.1 percent

Still, nearly half or 47 percent of the cars sold in Australia last month were SUVs, and Mr. Hagon put sports car sales on drivers who had much more choice in that segment.

“In the last 12 to 18 months in particular, we’ve boomed in the offering of small SUVs – not only have better replacement vehicles come through, there are also many more options for people out there,” he said. said.

Sales of the Toyota RAV4, another smaller SUV, were up 7.5 percent.

The popularity of small hatchbacks is declining: Hyundai i30 sales are down 29.2 percent and the number of Toyota Corollas leaving showrooms is down 4.1 percent.

The popularity of small hatchbacks is in the declining segment: Hyundai i30 sales (pictured) decreased 29.2 percent and the number of Toyota Corollas exiting showrooms declined 4.1 percent

The popularity of small hatchbacks is in the declining segment: Hyundai i30 sales (pictured) decreased 29.2 percent and the number of Toyota Corollas exiting showrooms declined 4.1 percent

The popularity of small hatchbacks is in the declining segment: Hyundai i30 sales (pictured) decreased 29.2 percent and the number of Toyota Corollas exiting showrooms declined 4.1 percent

The Mazda3, Australia’s bestseller in 2011 and 2012, didn’t even make the top ten.

“You have some stalwarts out there that last forever – Toyota Corolla, Mazda3 – but those cars are still in disrepair,” said Mr. Hagon.

“They are not in terminal decline and they will be around for a long time, but they are definitely declining and we are just seeing a continuation of that decline.”

Nissan has stopped selling the Pulsar small car in Australia, while Mitsubishi has cut the Lancer from the local range, with more Japanese automakers only selling SUVs, including the little ones and the giants that can tow.

Motorists weren't too keen on some smaller SUVs, however, with Mazda CX-5 sales (pictured) dropping 13.1 percent as demand for the Hyundai Tucson dropped by 5.9 percent. Nearly half or 47 percent of cars sold in Australia are SUVs, with drivers in this segment having much more choice

Motorists weren't too keen on some smaller SUVs, however, with Mazda CX-5 sales (pictured) dropping 13.1 percent as demand for the Hyundai Tucson dropped by 5.9 percent. Nearly half or 47 percent of cars sold in Australia are SUVs, with drivers in this segment having much more choice

Motorists weren’t too keen on some smaller SUVs, however, with Mazda CX-5 sales (pictured) dropping 13.1 percent as demand for the Hyundai Tucson dropped by 5.9 percent. Nearly half or 47 percent of cars sold in Australia are SUVs, with drivers in this segment having much more choice

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic, vehicle sales are rising among most Australian bestsellers, new data from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries shows

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic, vehicle sales are rising among most Australian bestsellers, new data from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries shows

For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic, vehicle sales are rising among most Australian bestsellers, new data from the Federal Chamber of Automotive Industries shows

.