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US Army tests laser weapon of 50 kilowatts that burns drones, helicopters, planes and rockets

A laser so powerful that it can burn through drones, helicopters, planes, and incoming enemy missiles must be tested by the US Army.

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In a & # 39; laser-off & # 39; planned by a recent report, the 50 kilowatt laser weapon will be installed on four Stryker vehicles and tested on & # 39; targets & # 39; as part of the Maneuver-Short Range Air Defense (M-SHORAD) mission.

The deadly laser weapon is in development for about six decades, but the US military is finally planning to prepare the first for fighting in 2022, has been revealed.

The 50 kilowatt laser weapon is installed on four Stryker vehicles and tested on & # 39; targets & # 39 ;. It is not known where the lasers are likely to be tested (stock)

With enough energy to power different houses, the lasers hope to offer extra protection against air threats on armored vehicles on the ground.

The vehicles have eight wheels and are much more resistant to the weight and vibrations caused by the use of the laser – a failed attempt to install it in aircraft has previously been made.

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US soldiers have spent hundreds of billions trying to find a & # 39; Death Ray & # 39; build in Star Wars style, but so far the plans have hardly been taken off the drawing board.

Lieutenant General L. Neil Thurgood, Director of Hypersonics, Directed Energy, Space and Rapid Acquisition, said in the recent US Army report: “It is now time to get targeted energy weapons to the battlefield.

A laser in the Starfire Optical Range of the Air Force Research Laboratory on a 6,240-foot hilltop at Kirtland Air Force Base, where the army and navy develop their own laser weapon systems.

A laser in the Starfire Optical Range of the Air Force Research Laboratory on a 6,240-foot hilltop at Kirtland Air Force Base, where the army and navy develop their own laser weapon systems.

A laser in the Starfire Optical Range of the Air Force Research Laboratory on a 6,240-foot hilltop at Kirtland Air Force Base, where the army and navy develop their own laser weapon systems

Real laser in action: the USS Ponce, an amphibious transport dock, was equipped with an XN-1 LaWS - Laser Warfare system - that can fire a 30-kilowatt beam that can paralyze the sensors of a target and burn engines

Real laser in action: the USS Ponce, an amphibious transport dock, was equipped with an XN-1 LaWS - Laser Warfare system - that can fire a 30-kilowatt beam that can paralyze the sensors of a target and burn engines

Real laser in action: the USS Ponce, an amphibious transport dock, was equipped with an XN-1 LaWS – Laser Warfare system – that can fire a 30-kilowatt beam that can paralyze the sensors of a target and burn engines

& # 39; The Army recognizes the need for targeted energy lasers as part of the Army Modernization Plan.

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& # 39; This is no longer a research effort or a demonstration effort. It is a strategic combat capability and we are on the right track to get it into the hands of soldiers. & # 39;

It is not known where or when the lasers are likely to be tested, only that they are scheduled for deployment in the next three years.

Until recently, the deadly laser has remained largely theoretical and was often linked to the idea of ​​defending the Earth against threats in space.

Principal investigators of early projects were not granted security clearance and were barely allowed to use their own bathrooms for fear of working for the Communists.

Could it have worked? This was an impression of an air force artist from 1984, who showed a laser powered by a satellite-supported nuclear reactor that hits a target head. Other satellites would detect the fired rocket

Could it have worked? This was an impression of an air force artist from 1984, who showed a laser powered by a satellite-supported nuclear reactor that hits a target head. Other satellites would detect the fired rocket

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Could it have worked? This was an impression of an air force artist from 1984, who showed a laser powered by a satellite-supported nuclear reactor that hits a target head. Other satellites would detect the fired rocket

Lasers tested on airplanes were so heavy that rocket boosters that were powerful enough to control them did not even exist – and those who got into the air were hit by vibration problems.

A $ 4.3 billion project led to an aircraft that had to return to the base after every flight and had to be sent to fight by hunters because it could not defend itself.

The most famous attempt to build space lasers was the Ronald Reagan & # 39; Star Wars & # 39; program in 1983, but after burning out more than $ 200 billion, it was canceled.

President Donald Trump has previously outlined his plan to create a new space power by 2020, where the American missile defense is reinvented.

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Trump said he wanted to detect and destroy any type of rocket attack on an American target, both before and after the launch.

The new range of sensors and interceptors will take incoming projectiles from & # 39; rogue states & # 39; like shooting North Korea, the president said.

Such conversations have been conducted more often – but the technology has not yet been released.

Mary J. Miller, Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology, said the & # 39; s programs would be extensively tested because the army & # 39; full capabilities & # 39; of the lasers before we offer it to a soldier. & # 39;

& # 39; It is done in a & # 39; step-by-step demonstration of skills & # 39 ;, she said.

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& # 39; We must ensure that the lasers work and do the full range of threats that we project. And those threats include the counter-missile, counter-artillery and counter-mortar as well as (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) and threats to cruise missiles. & # 39;

The Air Force spent billions on the plan to turn a Boeing 747 into a flying laser gun. There would be a fleet that could shoot rockets from the sky. In fact, the scheme has been canceled. One of the shortcomings was that the flying laser itself was vulnerable to attack and needed an escort of a fighter plane

The Air Force spent billions on the plan to turn a Boeing 747 into a flying laser gun. There would be a fleet that could shoot rockets from the sky. In fact, the scheme has been canceled. One of the shortcomings was that the flying laser itself was vulnerable to attack and needed an escort of a fighter plane

The Air Force spent billions on the plan to turn a Boeing 747 into a flying laser gun. There would be a fleet that could shoot rockets from the sky. In fact, the scheme has been canceled. One of the shortcomings was that the flying laser itself was vulnerable to attack and needed an escort of a fighter plane

What's on board: Two laser systems were on board the 747 laser weapon. Two solid-state lasers were used to illuminate the target, after which the CO2 laser fired a & # 39; kill & # 39; beam at the target, powered by rocket fuel. But it was canceled by the Air Force in 2011

What's on board: Two laser systems were on board the 747 laser weapon. Two solid-state lasers were used to illuminate the target, after which the CO2 laser fired a & # 39; kill & # 39; beam at the target, powered by rocket fuel. But it was canceled by the Air Force in 2011

What's on board: Two laser systems were on board the 747 laser weapon. Two solid-state lasers were used to illuminate the target, after which the CO2 laser fired a & # 39; kill & # 39; beam at the target, powered by rocket fuel. But it was canceled by the Air Force in 2011

Miller explained that the army had the & # 39; full capabilities & # 39; of the lasers before we offer it to a soldier. & # 39;

Operators must rely on what lasers can do, she added.

& # 39; Lasers have been promised for a long time, but they have never stopped and delivered what was asked for, so the operators are rightly skeptical & # 39 ;, she said.

& # 39; That's why the army is taking lasers to operational environments and testing them.

In the meantime, there will be steps whereby we will split off less powerful laser systems that can do good things on smaller platforms.

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& # 39; They will come out soon. & # 39;

The Air Force said it was already flying with prototype weapons.

On board: this was part of the laser systems that were placed on board the Boeing 747 in six modules in SUV format

On board: this was part of the laser systems that were placed on board the Boeing 747 in six modules in SUV format

On board: this was part of the laser systems that were placed on board the Boeing 747 in six modules in SUV format

Dr. David Walker, deputy deputy secretary of the air force for science, technology and engineering, office of the deputy secretary of the air force for acquisition, said the air force is working with Special Operations Command to develop an offensive laser that will be applied to AFSOC AC-130 gunships.

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Part of that technology, he said, includes & # 39; bundle control and power and thermal management & # 39 ;.

& # 39; The Air Force flies lasers every day under its transport aircraft and uses them as an infrared countermeasurement system & # 39 ;, so we have also disposed of less powerful laser systems and we have greater power outputs and better heat management from lasers with a smaller package, we will those forces also build in defensive to offensive abilities, & Walker said.

The marine science representative described similar laser programs for ships, submarines and marines.

The idea of ​​a laser fascinated the public long before the American engineer Theodore Maiman, an engineer at Hughes Research Laboratories in California, invented it in 1960.

The first mention of a & # 39; death ray & # 39; was presumably made by author Washington Irving in 1809 in a novel called & # 39; Knickerbocker & # 39; s History of New York & # 39 ;, which spoke of Europeans invading America armed with & # 39; concentrated sun rays & # 39 ;.

HOW CAN WE STOP THE SPACE WARS?

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A group of more than 40 international experts is conducting a multi-year research project that will culminate in a Handbook on international law applicable to military use of space.

MILAMOS The project must ensure that space activities are carried out in accordance with the rule of law.

This means that the existing international rules for space must be taken into account.

It also includes integration with international humanitarian law and the rules that prohibit the use of force.

Drawing up the rules will involve many meetings, heated discussions and compromises.

It is intended that at the end of the project the applicable rules are agreed on the basis of consensus.

The MILAMOS project is not an attempt to approve warfare in space.

On the contrary, it aims to prevent armed conflicts and to minimize the devastating impact that space technology and military operations can have on the long-term and peaceful use of space.

The Outer Space Treaty, signed in 1967, was agreed by the United Nations, and today it remains as the & # 39; constitution & # 39; of the space.

The space treaty states that the heavenly territory is not subject to & # 39; national appropriation & # 39; – in other words, no country can claim it.

In the fifty years that the treaty has existed, it must still be violated.

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