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Twisting gas and dust 520 light-years from Earth may be the first evidence of a baby planet

A stunning image of twisting gas and dust 520 light-years from Earth may be the first direct evidence of the emergence of a new planet

  • ESO made breathtaking images of itinerant dust and gas in the constellation Auriga
  • The formation is located 520 light-years from Earth and may have been the birth of the planet
  • Baby planets “kick” the gas and cause the disc to form a wave

A fiery spiral structure has been spun 520 light-years from Earth, which may be the first evidence of the emergence of a new planet.

The Very Large Telescope at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) captured stunning images of dust and gas vortices in the constellation Auriga.

Researchers noted that the spirals indicate the presence of baby planets, which “kick” the gas and cause “disruptions in the disk in the form of a wave.”

The very bright yellow ‘twist’ area close to the center is one of these disturbance locations where the team thinks a planet is being created.

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A fiery spiral structure rotated 520 light-years from Earth may be the first evidence of a new planet emerging. The European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope captured stunning images of dust and gas vortices in the constellation Auriga

A fiery spiral structure rotated 520 light-years from Earth may be the first evidence of a new planet emerging. The European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope captured stunning images of dust and gas vortices in the constellation Auriga

The Aurigae system was observed a few years ago with the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array.

Then, a team of international scientists used the Very Large Telescope to investigate the constellation observed in 2018.

Anthony Boccaletti, who led the study at the Paris Observatory, PSL University, France, said, “Thousands of exoplanets have been identified so far, but little is known about how they originate.”

“We have to observe very young systems to really capture the moment when planets form.”

In 2019, the team activated the SPHERE instrument on the telescope in Chile so they could see the dimmer light from small dust grenades and emissions from the inner disk.

After confirming the spiral arms, scientists noted the ‘twist’ suggesting continued planet formation in the disk.

Co-author Anne Dutrey said, “The turn is expected from some theoretical models of planet formation.”

“It corresponds to the connection of two spirals – one twists inward from the orbit of the planet, the other expands outward – converging at the planet’s location. They allow gas and dust from the disk to settle and grow on the forming planet. ‘

Researchers noted that the spirals indicate the presence of baby planets, which “kick” the gas and cause “disruptions in the disk in the form of a wave.” The very bright yellow ‘twist’ area close to the center is one of these disruption locations where the team thinks a planet is being created

ESO is building the 127-foot Extremely Large Telescope, which will pull technology from both the ALMA and the SPHERE to study extrasolar worlds.

As Boccaletti explains, this powerful telescope will allow astronomers to get even more detailed images of planets in the making.

“We need to be able to see directly and more precisely how the dynamics of the gas contribute to the formation of planets,” he concludes.

WHAT IS THE VERY LARGE TELESCOPE?

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) has built the most powerful telescope ever made in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile.

It’s called the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and it is widely regarded as one of the most advanced optical instruments ever made.

It consists of four telescopes, of which The main mirrors are 27 feet (8.2 meters) in diameter.

There are also four movable auxiliary telescopes with a diameter of 1.8 meters.

The large telescopes are called Antu, Kueyen, Melipal and Yepun.

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) built the most powerful telescope ever made in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile and called it the Very Large Telescope (VLT).

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) built the most powerful telescope ever made in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile and called it the Very Large Telescope (VLT).

The European Southern Observatory (ESO) built the most powerful telescope ever made in the Atacama Desert in northern Chile and called it the Very Large Telescope (VLT).

The first of the Unit telescopes, “Antu”, began routine scientific operations on April 1, 1999.

The telescopes can work together to form a giant ‘interferometer’.

With this interferometer, images can be filtered for unnecessary obscuring objects and as a result, astronomers can see details up to 25 times finer than with the individual telescopes.

It has been involved in spotting the first image of an extrasolar planet and tracking individual stars moving around the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way.

It also observed the afterglow of the furthest known Gamma Ray Burst,

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