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Tributes to Ruth Bader Ginsburg continue to flow as 'Fearless Girl' statue is adorned with a collar 

The iconic ‘Fearless Girl’ statue in New York City was adorned with a lace collar in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and grief-stricken Americans continued to lay flower bouquets at makeshift memorials in Washington D.C. as tributes continued this week.   

Millions of Americans mourned on Friday evening as word that Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a legal pioneer for gender equality and feminist icon for generations of people, died insider her Washington D.C. home. 

After serving 27 years on the U.S. Supreme Court and becoming only the second woman to do so, Ginsburg succumbed to a long battle metastatic pancreatic cancer. She was 87 years old.

The vacant Supreme Court seat quickly hurtled Capitol Hill into a frenzy as the Trump administration – backed many, but not all of his colleagues – pushed for it to be filled as soon as possible amid criticism from Democrats.

But in New York, the ‘Fearless Girl’ statue nestled on Wall Street was decorated in a lace jabot to celebrate Ginsburg’s fearless approach to empowerment. 

Some 200 miles east in Washington D.C.,  the U.S. Supreme Court building has been covered in blanket of flowers, murals and makeshift memorials as the city paid its respects.

Harvard Law students in Cambridge, Massachusetts, remembers Ginsburg erected a memorial to honor all the contributions Ginsburg has made to America. 

And in California, locals gathered for candlelight vigils in the days following Ginsburg’s death.

Tributes to Ruth Bader Ginsburg overtook the United States this weekend, including the Fearless Girl statue in New York City (pictured), after she died on Friday

Tributes to Ruth Bader Ginsburg overtook the United States this weekend, including the Fearless Girl statue in New York City (pictured), after she died on Friday

A woman with her daughter looks at the flowers and messages left in remembrance for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

A woman with her daughter looks at the flowers and messages left in remembrance for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

A woman with her daughter looks at the flowers and messages left in remembrance for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

A number of makeshift memorials, many of them with flowers and photos of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, were created by admirers of the Supreme Court Justice

A number of makeshift memorials, many of them with flowers and photos of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, were created by admirers of the Supreme Court Justice

A number of makeshift memorials, many of them with flowers and photos of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, were created by admirers of the Supreme Court Justice 

Hundreds attended a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Monument Square in Portland, Maine, on Sunday after she died two days earlier from pancreatic cancer

Hundreds attended a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Monument Square in Portland, Maine, on Sunday after she died two days earlier from pancreatic cancer

Hundreds attended a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Monument Square in Portland, Maine, on Sunday after she died two days earlier from pancreatic cancer

The U.S. Supreme Court this weekend was flooded with flower bouquets, banners, photos and signs to pay tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured)

The U.S. Supreme Court this weekend was flooded with flower bouquets, banners, photos and signs to pay tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured)

The U.S. Supreme Court this weekend was flooded with flower bouquets, banners, photos and signs to pay tribute to Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured)

New York City 

New York City residents honored Ginsburg with a heartfelt, poignant tribute on Monday by decorating the ‘Fearless Girl’ statue with her signature piece. 

Standing defiantly across from the New York Stock Exchange, the ‘Fearless Girl’ statue was embellished with a white, lace jabot collar.

During her time on the highest court, Ginsburg became known for her various, beautifully designed jabot’s that were worn as she navigated complex judiciary issues. 

The 'Fearless Girl' state found on New York City's Wall Street was adorned with a lace jabot in honor of Ginsburg, who was known to wear decorative pieces during her service

The 'Fearless Girl' state found on New York City's Wall Street was adorned with a lace jabot in honor of Ginsburg, who was known to wear decorative pieces during her service

The ‘Fearless Girl’ state found on New York City’s Wall Street was adorned with a lace jabot in honor of Ginsburg, who was known to wear decorative pieces during her service 

Iryna Soares of Belarus poses draped in a white-and-red opposition movement flag of Belarus next to the Fearless Girl statue, which had a jabot collar placed on her in honor of recently passed

Iryna Soares of Belarus poses draped in a white-and-red opposition movement flag of Belarus next to the Fearless Girl statue, which had a jabot collar placed on her in honor of recently passed

Iryna Soares of Belarus poses draped in a white-and-red opposition movement flag of Belarus next to the Fearless Girl statue, which had a jabot collar placed on her in honor of recently passed

A person takes a selfie with the Fearless Girl statue in New York City after a jabot collar was placed on it in honor of recently died in Washington D.C. on Friday

A person takes a selfie with the Fearless Girl statue in New York City after a jabot collar was placed on it in honor of recently died in Washington D.C. on Friday

A person takes a selfie with the Fearless Girl statue in New York City after a jabot collar was placed on it in honor of recently died in Washington D.C. on Friday

An original plague for the 'Fearless Girl' statue read, 'Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference' and Ginsburg was celebrated for fighting gender-based discrimination and advocating for equality

An original plague for the 'Fearless Girl' statue read, 'Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference' and Ginsburg was celebrated for fighting gender-based discrimination and advocating for equality

An original plague for the ‘Fearless Girl’ statue read, ‘Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference’ and Ginsburg was celebrated for fighting gender-based discrimination and advocating for equality

Ginsburg explained in the 2015 book, ‘Notorious RBG: The Life and Times of Ruth Bader Ginsburg,’ that she had a specific ‘dissenting collar’ that she wore on days she planned to break ranks with her Supreme Court colleagues. 

She added that: ‘This is my dissenting collar… It looks fitting for dissents.’

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured) died in Washington D.C. on Friday evening after a long battled with pancreatic cander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured) died in Washington D.C. on Friday evening after a long battled with pancreatic cander

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (pictured) died in Washington D.C. on Friday evening after a long battled with pancreatic cander 

It’s not a coincidence that Ginsburg and ‘Fearless Girl’  were tied together, given the rise of the statue’s prominence as a symbol of women’s leadership and strength.

An original plague for the statue read: ‘Know the power of women in leadership. SHE makes a difference.’ Ginsburg was celebrated for fighting gender-based discrimination and advocating for equality.

The collar was placed there by State Street Global Advisors, the asset management company that initially commissioned the statue.  

The company placed an ad featuring the newly-decorated statue in The New York Times Sunday edition with the phrase: ‘Here’s to the original.’ 

Meanwhile, a makeshift memorial for Ginsburg was erected at the base of the ‘Alma Mater’ statue at Columbia University, where Ginsburg graduated top of her class from the law school in 1959

.A swath of flower bouquets rested on the ground, while hand-drawn signs and banners sat nearby.

A makeshift memorial was created by New York City residents at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University, where she graduated from law school after transferring

A makeshift memorial was created by New York City residents at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University, where she graduated from law school after transferring

A makeshift memorial was created by New York City residents at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University, where she graduated from law school after transferring 

One sign, reading 'When there are nine,' referenced a well-known quote from the Ginsburg where she explained that there would be enough women in the U.S. Supreme Court when it was all women

One sign, reading 'When there are nine,' referenced a well-known quote from the Ginsburg where she explained that there would be enough women in the U.S. Supreme Court when it was all women

One sign, reading ‘When there are nine,’ referenced a well-known quote from the Ginsburg where she explained that there would be enough women in the U.S. Supreme Court when it was all women

One sign, reading ‘When there are nine,’ referenced a well-known quote from the Brooklyn-native about equality. 

When asked when there would be enough women in the Supreme Court, Ginsburg responded, ‘When there are nine.’

‘People are shocked. But there’d been nine men, and nobody’s ever raised a question about that,’ she added.

Some people left behind touching notes that expressed their gratitude and admiration for the work she did in Washington D.C  

Some New York City residents left touching thank you notes and written tributes this weekend at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University  (pictured)

Some New York City residents left touching thank you notes and written tributes this weekend at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University  (pictured)

Some New York City residents left touching thank you notes and written tributes this weekend at the Alma Mater statue at Columbia University  (pictured)

Andrew Cuomo: 'Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg selflessly pursued truth and justice in a world of division, giving voice to the voiceless and uplift those who were pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference'

Andrew Cuomo: 'Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg selflessly pursued truth and justice in a world of division, giving voice to the voiceless and uplift those who were pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference'

Andrew Cuomo: ‘Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg selflessly pursued truth and justice in a world of division, giving voice to the voiceless and uplift those who were pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference’

Stefanie McKenzie, a Columbia University student from Kenya, told New York Daily News that Ginsburg was a personal hero.

‘She represented all of the ideals I believe in,’ McKenzie, 19, told NYDN.  ‘Going to the school, there are all these big names and it gets hard, you lose focus, but she didn’t, she fought all her life and I find that so inspiring.

After her death, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo revealed that a statue of Ginsburg would be built in Brooklyn. 

‘Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg selflessly pursued truth and justice in a world of division, giving voice to the voiceless and uplift those who were pushed aside by forces of hate and indifference,’ said Cuomo.

‘As a lawyer, jurist, and professor, she redefined gender equity and civil rights and ensured America lived up to her founding ideals – she was a monumental figure of equality, and we can all agree that she deserves a monument in her honor.’

Washington D.C.  

In Washington D.C., Capitol Hill was transformed into a makeshift garden as loads of bouquets and single stem flowers overcame the sector.

People of all generations stood outside the winding steps to mourn Ginsburg’s death in the city where she worked tirelessly and with fierce dedication for decades.

Several banners held quotes from Ginsburg, including one that read ‘Women Belong in All Places Where Decisions Are Being Made.’ 

Amy Weaver gathered before the Supreme Court building on Saturday for an evening candlelight vigil. She drove 10 hours from the Chattahoochee River in Georgia after learning of Ginsburg’s death.

‘When I wanted to go to law school, I was told I couldn’t work and study at the same time,’ Weaver told National Geographic.

 ‘I was divorced with two young children, and I was told I couldn’t do it all. Women like RBG were showing me I could.’   

A woman with her dog photographs flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC,

A woman with her dog photographs flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC,

A woman with her dog photographs flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside the Supreme Court in Washington, DC,

A woman and her daughter look at flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Monday as the city grapples with the immense loss (pictured)

A woman and her daughter look at flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Monday as the city grapples with the immense loss (pictured)

A woman and her daughter look at flowers and items left in remembrance at a memorial for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on Monday as the city grapples with the immense loss (pictured)

A t-shirt left behind at a memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building featured a picture of Ginsburg and her nickname, 'Notorious RBG,' in reference to Brooklyn rapper Notorious BIG

A t-shirt left behind at a memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building featured a picture of Ginsburg and her nickname, 'Notorious RBG,' in reference to Brooklyn rapper Notorious BIG

A t-shirt left behind at a memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court building featured a picture of Ginsburg and her nickname, ‘Notorious RBG,’ in reference to Brooklyn rapper Notorious BIG

A picture, flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

A picture, flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

A picture, flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg outside of the Supreme Court in Washington, DC

Sarah Silberman visited the National Portrait Gallery this weekend to view the portraits of the four women Supreme Court Justices: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sandra Day O’Conno, Elena Kagan and Soni Sotomayor.

‘I started coming to see this portrait when I was applying to law school, back in 2015,’ she told National Geographic.

‘Then I just made a point of visiting once a year. Any time I struggled in law school, any time I felt like I wasn’t going to make it, I thought of her caring for her husband with cancer and for her child, while still taking classes. She made me believe I could make it through.’

And Paula Hughes, a former public defender, told National Geographic that she drove more than six hours from Columbus, Ohio, to Washington D.C. to mourn Ginsburg’s death.

She brought along her 10-year-old daughter, Lilly.

‘I’ve been an RBG groupie for years, and I always told my children that the women lawyers and women judges that came before me were the only reason I was allowed to practice,’ Hughes told the publication.

‘My older kids knew I would fall apart when I heard the news, so they told my sister first, and she broke it to me.’

Silberman: 'Any time I struggled in law school, any time I felt like I wasn’t going to make it, I thought of her caring for her husband with cancer and for her child, while still taking classes. She made me believe I could make it through'

Silberman: 'Any time I struggled in law school, any time I felt like I wasn’t going to make it, I thought of her caring for her husband with cancer and for her child, while still taking classes. She made me believe I could make it through'

Silberman: ‘Any time I struggled in law school, any time I felt like I wasn’t going to make it, I thought of her caring for her husband with cancer and for her child, while still taking classes. She made me believe I could make it through’

Elsewhere in the city, a number of painted murals of Ginsburg appeared on store fronts and building exteriors as locals grappled with the loss. 

Rose Jaffe, a local artist, told WUSA 9 that she was commissioned to create one of the murals, but did not know how the community would react to her piece.

Luckily, she was pleasantly surprised by the outpouring of love and compassion.

‘I didn’t know what to expect. And this is just blowing me away. I hope that this lives on as a monument to her,’ said Jaffe.

Christily St. Sauver was one resident who visited the mural and, as she held back tears, told WUSA 9 that Ginsburg’s commitment to public service deeply impacted her own.

‘My thanks to her is that I was an air force officer and a mother. That being one, I didn’t have to give up the other, because of a case that she argued,’ St. Sauver said.

Murals of Ruth Bader Ginsburg were commissioned to artists and quickly appeared across Washington D.C. after the Justice died inside her home on Friday (pictured)

Murals of Ruth Bader Ginsburg were commissioned to artists and quickly appeared across Washington D.C. after the Justice died inside her home on Friday (pictured)

Murals of Ruth Bader Ginsburg were commissioned to artists and quickly appeared across Washington D.C. after the Justice died inside her home on Friday (pictured)

Five-year-old Abby Martin  (left) of Arlington, Virginia, pays respect with her mother Jackie Martin (right) as they visit a makeshift memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Five-year-old Abby Martin  (left) of Arlington, Virginia, pays respect with her mother Jackie Martin (right) as they visit a makeshift memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Five-year-old Abby Martin  (left) of Arlington, Virginia, pays respect with her mother Jackie Martin (right) as they visit a makeshift memorial in front of the U.S. Supreme Court for the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

 Cambridge 

 Law students across the United States flooded social media with posts idolizing Ginsburg and applauding her work after her death.

In Cambridge, Massachusetts, students created a makeshift memorial covered in post-it notes, photos of Ginsburg and flowers outside of Harvard University. 

During a vigil held on Sunday, a number of Harvard students and Boston locals discussed Ginsburg’s legacy.

‘I’m just really grateful for what she has done for women in this country and for women at this school,’  Jin Lee, a second-year Harvard Law student, told WGBH

‘She has definitely influenced my decision to become a lawyer. She has shown me that as long as you keep pushing on the limits, they will expand. And that’s what I hope to do.’ 

Flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg are placed outside of the Harvard Law School library at Langdell Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg are placed outside of the Harvard Law School library at Langdell Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts

Flowers and messages left in remembrance of the late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg are placed outside of the Harvard Law School library at Langdell Hall in Cambridge, Massachusetts

A woman holds a flower while listening to a speaker during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

A woman holds a flower while listening to a speaker during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

A woman holds a flower while listening to a speaker during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

A memorial to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is displayed at Fenway Park before a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees (pictured)

A memorial to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is displayed at Fenway Park before a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees (pictured)

A memorial to late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is displayed at Fenway Park before a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and the New York Yankees (pictured)

Sister Lida Christ, with The Boston Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, reads from the vigil program during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

Sister Lida Christ, with The Boston Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, reads from the vigil program during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

Sister Lida Christ, with The Boston Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, reads from the vigil program during a vigil for Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Copley Square in Boston on Sunday

Ginsburg was one of eight woman in a class of 552 men when she enrolled at Harvard Law School.

‘Obviously, it’s a pretty big blow to lose her on the court right now, and to lose her as an icon to so many people everywhere,’  Heidi Mitchell, a political consultant, told WGBH.

‘But it’s also nice to just be able to show our appreciation for everything she stood for.’

Perez: 'You feel the loss of her and the legacy that she left, and you wonder who else is going to be the next person that's going to do as much as she did for women in law'

Perez: 'You feel the loss of her and the legacy that she left, and you wonder who else is going to be the next person that's going to do as much as she did for women in law'

Perez: ‘You feel the loss of her and the legacy that she left, and you wonder who else is going to be the next person that’s going to do as much as she did for women in law’

Pictured: a framed thank you note was placed at a memorial for Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington D.C. this weekend after she died on Friday

Pictured: a framed thank you note was placed at a memorial for Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington D.C. this weekend after she died on Friday

Pictured: a framed thank you note was placed at a memorial for Ruth Bader Ginsburg in Washington D.C. this weekend after she died on Friday

Stephanie Perez stopped by the Harvard memorial with her parents and said she feels compelled to make a difference in the world following Ginsburg’s death.

‘You feel the loss of her and the legacy that she left, and you wonder who else is going to be the next person that’s going to do as much as she did for women in law,’ Perez told WGBH.

‘I definitely feel a sense of duty to do something to make a difference. In her name, but also, that’s why we’re all here.’

Sacramento

On the West Coast, admirers of Ginsburg’s also held vigils and created makeshift murals for the late Justice.

Residents gathered outside the Sacramento County Courthouse, some with candles and photos of Ginsburg, before attending another vigil at the California State Capitol, Capradio reports.

Lynn Lenzi, of North Natomas, told Capradio that she visited the memorial to remember Ginsburg’s legacy of fighting for women.

Photos taken by KCRA show mourners standing outside in face masks with candles and signs. 

Residents in Sacramento, California, gathered for candlelight vigils and created memorials to pay their respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Residents in Sacramento, California, gathered for candlelight vigils and created memorials to pay their respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Residents in Sacramento, California, gathered for candlelight vigils and created memorials to pay their respects to Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Lenzi: 'She paved the way for women in all walks of life, and she worked tirelessly to break down the norms of society at the time, discrimination against women of all races and creeds'

Lenzi: 'She paved the way for women in all walks of life, and she worked tirelessly to break down the norms of society at the time, discrimination against women of all races and creeds'

Lenzi: ‘She paved the way for women in all walks of life, and she worked tirelessly to break down the norms of society at the time, discrimination against women of all races and creeds’

‘She paved the way for women in all walks of life, and she worked tirelessly to break down the norms of society at the time, discrimination against women of all races and creeds,’ said Lenzi.

‘She was someone who you admired. We’re just here to pay our respects and say goodbye.’ 

A Sacramento-native said she wanted to support others like Ginsburg who were ‘trying to help those that are truly challenged.’

‘Ruth was an incredible woman that stood for so much righteous,’  Maria Dickerson told Capradio. 

‘And we’ve been having such a hard time, and she was an incredible fighter and I think that it is very important to support where we care as much as we can.’      

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