Tom Brady launches his own NFT platform, Autograph, where celebrities can sell digital collectibles

0

Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady launches his own non-fungible token (NFT) platform and becomes the latest celebrity offering digital collectibles in the rising blockchain market.

That platform, Autograph, will launch this spring and promises to include big names in sports, entertainment and fashion, all of which will create and sell unique digital collectibles, a Brady spokesperson said. CNN

Autograph’s famous partners have not been disclosed, nor are there individual collectibles.

NFTs are digital representations of assets, images or information that can be bought or sold. Authenticity of NFTs is verified through blockchain technology, a digital ledger that in theory can only be changed publicly to prevent fraud. Unlike expendable cryptocurrencies, such as Bitcoin, NFTs cannot be traded with equivalence as they are all unique.

While NFTs can be used to display a variety of information, they are making headlines as collectibles – everything from JPEGs of priceless art to a sound bite of a breezy Brooklyn man going through the wind (yes, this is true, and it sold for $ 85).

Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady launches his own non-replaceable token (NFT) platform and becomes the latest celebrity offering digital collectibles in the rising blockchain market

Buccaneers quarterback Tom Brady launches his own non-replaceable token (NFT) platform and becomes the latest celebrity offering digital collectibles in the rising blockchain market

Autograph's NFTs have not been disclosed, as have the platform's famous partners.  Currently the website is signed by Tom Brady with the initials LFG: Let's F *** ing Go

Autograph's NFTs have not been disclosed, as have the platform's famous partners.  Currently the website is signed by Tom Brady with the initials LFG: Let's F *** ing Go

Autograph’s NFTs have not been disclosed, as have the platform’s famous partners. Currently the website is signed by Tom Brady with the initials LFG: Let’s F *** ing Go

A tokenized version of Twitter’s first tweet sold for $ 2.9 million, but that was nothing compared to a digital collage by artist Mike Winkelmann known as Beeple that fetched $ 69.4 million at auction.

The sports industry has also embraced NFTs.

The NBA has already recorded $ 500 million in NFT sales on its platform, NBA Top Shot, which allows fans to buy and trade digitized video tokens with a price between $ 2 and $ 210,000.

Meanwhile, the creator of NBA Top Shot, Canadian blockchain technology company Dapper Labs, has pulled in $ 305 million in private funding from current and former league stars like Michael Jordan, according to The Associated Press.

As for Autograph, Brady and partner Richard Rosenblatt hope to offer more than just digital memorabilia. The pair say Autograph will have live auctions, physical product drops, and other in-person experiences for customers.

“Autograph brings together some of the world’s most iconic names and brands with the best digital artists to invent, create and launch NFTs and groundbreaking experiences for a community of fans and collectors,” Rosenblatt told CNN.

Not much more is currently publicly known about Autograph.

Currently, the company’s website features Brady’s signature initials LFG, which stand for “ Let’s F *** ing Go ” – a common sports chorus co-opted by the seven-time Super Bowl champion. An advisory board is also mentioned, including Jason Robins, CEO of Draft Kings and Jon Feltheimer, CEO of Lionsgate.

This NFT of a LeBron James high could fetch anywhere from $ 4,250 to $ 50,000

This NFT of a LeBron James high could fetch anywhere from $ 4,250 to $ 50,000

This NFT of a LeBron James high could fetch anywhere from $ 4,250 to $ 50,000

Valued anywhere between ‘worthless’ and ‘priceless’, NFTs are the latest blockchain innovation to challenge the public’s concept of economic value.

Like a baseball card or any other collectible item, NFTs are worth money simply because people think they are worth money.

They’re also beneficial because, unlike a Mickey Mantle rookie card, an NFT doesn’t need to be verified or stored in an expensive safe.

In addition, the blockchain technology serves as a verifiable ledger that prevents fraud, giving customers more confidence in the products than works of art or other collectibles that can be forged.

“The cool thing here is that I don’t have to put my baseball card in a hermetically sealed device and send it to a grader to see if it’s in perfect condition and he’s got the providence right that it’s not a forgery,” Dr. Rodney Fort, a professor at the University of Michigan’s School of Sports Management, told DailyMail.com.

“It’s completely private and credible,” Fort continued. If there is one thing that blockchain has shown, it is that you can believe it. If it tells you something about a possession that is the truth, otherwise the whole thing would have collapsed like a house of cards. ‘

The NBA has already recorded $ 500 million in NFT sales on its platform, NBA Top Shot, which allows fans to buy and trade digitized video tokens with a price between $ 2 and $ 210,000.

The NBA has already recorded $ 500 million in NFT sales on its platform, NBA Top Shot, which allows fans to buy and trade digitized video tokens with a price between $ 2 and $ 210,000.

The NBA has already recorded $ 500 million in NFT sales on its platform, NBA Top Shot, which allows fans to buy and trade digitized video tokens with a price between $ 2 and $ 210,000.