The Yellowstone National Park was hit by 153 earthquakes in July

The Yellowstone National Park was hit by a swarm & # 39; of 153 mini earthquakes last month, according to the latest data from the seismograph station of the University of Utah.

The largest of these tremors registered a magnitude of 2.5 on the Richter magnitude scale, which is not enough to cause damage to buildings, but shakes the ground enough to be perceived by people in the area.

Under the Yellowstone National Park there is a supervolcano that simmers.

The last time it exploded 630,000 years ago, the huge volcano produced one of the largest known explosions on Earth, spitting more than 2,000 times the amount of ash that St. Helens made when it erupted in 1980 and killed 57 people.

However, experts have said that the latest sequence of earthquakes recorded in the Yellowstone area is not an immediate cause for concern.

The alert level is that the area remains at & # 39; normal & # 39 ;.

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Yellowstone National Park was hit by 153 mini earthquakes in July, according to scientists. In the photo you see an overview of the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park.

Yellowstone National Park was hit by 153 mini earthquakes in July, according to scientists. In the photo you see an overview of the Norris Geyser Basin in Yellowstone National Park.

According to data from the Seismograph Station of the University of Utah, which analyzes the Yellowstone Seismic Network, the largest earthquake occurred on July 4, 2018 at 7:09 PM, local time.

It was part of a sequence of 12 separate earthquakes located about eight miles east southeast of West Thumb in Wyoming that occurred between July 2 and 10.

"A larger sequence of 77 earthquakes occurred about 14 kilometers south-southwest of Mammoth, Wyoming, between July 16 and 27," the researchers wrote.

"The biggest earthquake in this swarm was a 2.3 magnitude earthquake on July 24 at 8:40 PM."

Experts say that earthquake sequences like this are common and account for about 50 percent of the total seismic activity in the Yellowstone region.

"The seismic activity of Yellowstone is maintained at background levels," the researchers wrote.

Scientists at the Yellowstone Volcanic Observatory also continue to help their colleagues in Hawaii with the response to the ongoing crisis at Kilauea Volcano.

Large eruptions of Yellowstone volcano occurred 2.2 million, 1.3 million and 630,000 years ago.

While it has not flown for more than 600,000 years, scientists are working to better understand Yellowstone in the hope of predicting the next eruption.

Last month, a fissure opened in Grand Tenton National Park just 60 miles (100 km) from the Yellowstone volcano, prompting authorities to close the area immediately.

The experts detected the expansion of cracks in the buttress of the rock, which geologists were following closely to detect the movement.

Last month, a fissure opened in Grand Tenton National Park just 60 miles (100 km) from Yellowstone volcano, prompting officials to immediately close the area.

Last month, a fissure opened in Grand Tenton National Park just 60 miles (100 km) from Yellowstone volcano, prompting officials to immediately close the area.

"The Hidden Falls and Inspiration Point areas are currently closed due to the high potential for falling rocks," says a statement from a Grand Teton National Park spokesman in Wyoming.

The Hidden Falls is a 100-foot (30-meter) waterfall near the east end of Cascade Canyon and Inspiration Point is a stop on a hike overlooking Lake Jenny.

"The area was closed to protect human security on July 10 after expansive cracks were detected in a rocky buttress.

"Geologists are monitoring the support movement and have initiated a risk assessment for the area."

The Hidden Falls (pictured) is a 100-foot (30-meter) waterfall near the east end of Cascade Canyon. The area is not far from the potentially devastating Yellowstone volcano

The Hidden Falls (pictured) is a 100-foot (30-meter) waterfall near the east end of Cascade Canyon. The area is not far from the potentially devastating Yellowstone volcano

In June, it was revealed that scientists have devised a new way to discover how fast the magma is building up under the Yellowstone supervolcano.

The technique allows experts to accurately estimate the amount of magma that enters the supervolcano from the depths of the earth's crust in a process known as recharge.

While the new method does not allow scientists to predict when Yellowstone will erupt, it could help better understand how the volcano replenishes its deadly reserves of magma.

Inspiration Point (pictured) is a stop on a hike near Jenny Lake. Large eruptions of Yellowstone volcano occurred 2.2 million, 1.3 million and 630,000 years ago

Inspiration Point (pictured) is a stop on a hike near Jenny Lake. Large eruptions of Yellowstone volcano occurred 2.2 million, 1.3 million and 630,000 years ago

CAN AN ERUPTION BE PREVENTED IN THE SUPERVOLCANO YELLOWSTONE?

Previous research found a relatively small magma chamber, known as the magma deposit of the upper crust, below the surface

Recent research found a small magma chamber, known as the magma reservoir of the upper crust, below the surface

NASA believes that drilling up to six miles (10km) to the supervolcano below Yellowstone National Park to pump high pressure water could cool it down.

Although the mission would cost $ 3.46 billion (£ 2.63 billion), NASA considers it "the most viable solution."

Using heat as a resource also raises the opportunity to pay for the plan: it could be used to create a geothermal plant that generates electric power at extremely competitive prices of around $ 0.10 (£ 0.08) per kWh.

But this method of subjecting a supervolcano has the potential to be counterproductive and unleash the supervolcanic eruption that NASA is trying to prevent.

& # 39; Drill at the top of the magma chamber & # 39; It would be very risky; & # 39; however, careful drilling from the bottom sides could work.

This USGS graph shows how a "super eruption" of molten lava under Yellowstone National Park would scatter ashes throughout the United States

This USGS graph shows how a "super eruption" of molten lava under Yellowstone National Park would scatter ashes throughout the United States

Even in addition to the potentially devastating risks, the plan to cool Yellowstone with drilling is not simple.

Doing so would be an unbearably slow process that would occur at a rate of one meter per year, which means that it would take tens of thousands of years to completely cool it down.

And even then, there would be no guarantee that it would be successful for at least hundreds or possibly thousands of years.

Researchers at Washington State University said that these puddles of molten volcanic rock form underground magma chambers and are key to the eruption process.

"It's the coal in the furnace that's heating things up," said study co-author Professor Peter Larson.

& # 39; It is heating the boiler. The boiler is what explodes.

"This tells us what the boiler is heating up."

Scientists have devised a new way to find out how fast the magma is building up under the Yellowstone supervolcano. The technique allows them to accurately estimate the amount of magma that enters the volcano. Pictured is the large prismatic pool in Yellowstone National Park

The researchers "clicked" several hot springs in Yellowstone National Park with stable isotope deuterium (photo). Deuterium was harmless to the environment and approved by park officials.

The researchers "clicked" several hot springs in Yellowstone National Park with stable isotope deuterium (photo). Deuterium was harmless to the environment and approved by park officials.

Once these cameras are full, the shape of the terrain could explode at any time, potentially erupting within months or several millennia after the recharging of a magma.

The eruption occurs when the magma chambers burst, throwing up to 240 cubic miles (1,000 cubic kilometers) of magma into the air.

A key factor in the destructive power of the volcano is an explosive, silica-rich volcanic rock called rhyolite that breaks through the earth's crust during an eruption.

When it blew up for the last time, the supervolcano produced one of the largest known explosions on Earth, spewing more than 2,000 times as much ash as Mount St. Helens when it erupted in 1980 (pictured), killing 57 people in the eruption most disastrous in the history of the United States

When it blew up for the last time, the supervolcano produced one of the largest known explosions on Earth, spewing more than 2,000 times as much ash as Mount St. Helens when it erupted in 1980 (pictured), killing 57 people in the eruption most disastrous in the history of the United States

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