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“The weather gods smile”: drought-ridden dams almost FULL after a record-high shower

Farmers and rural communities along the east coast of Australia are rejoicing now that the dams are full.

Six dams and dams in South East Queensland are officially overcapacity after significant rainfall in the region last week.

Dehydrated dams in the Sydney area also swell to their highest level in years, as heavy rainfall continues to permeate the Eastern NSW.

Farmers and rural communities along the east coast of Australia are now rejoicing that the dams are filling up after the rain (the photo shows Pune Dam in southeast Queensland)

Warragamba Dam to the west of Sydney is expected to receive its best inflow since April 2017 (pictured water overflows near Parramatta River after heavy rains in Sydney)

Warragamba Dam to the west of Sydney is expected to receive its best inflow since April 2017 (pictured is flooding of water near Parramatta River after heavy rains in Sydney)

A radar image of rain over the Sydney area on Saturday that has caused flooding and raised dams

A radar image of rain over the Sydney area on Saturday that has caused flooding and raised dams

Water supplier from the government WaterNSW says that Warragamba Dam to the west of Sydney is expected to receive its best inflow since April 2017.

Warragamba Dam, the primary water source for urban Sydney, was close to 44 percent of capacity on Sunday afternoon and was expected to rise to 55 percent.

The increase was equivalent to recouping nine months of water supply in less than a week, WaterNSW said.

While the catchment areas in eastern parts of the state have been boosted, other drought-affected inland areas have not been so lucky.

The Burrendong Dam, which serves large regional areas in the west of NSW, such as Dubbo, had only one percent capacity on Sunday according to WaterNSW.

Ash and debris left after the recent bushfire crisis are likely to end up in the Warragamba basin, but have no impact on water quality.

A tree floats over a small bay near the dam wall at Warragamba Dam in Warragamba, Australia, Wednesday January 29, 2020

A tree floats over a small bay near the dam wall at Warragamba Dam in Warragamba, Australia, Wednesday January 29, 2020

Watering rains in Sydney have caused flooding (photo is the Parramatta River)

Watering rains in Sydney have caused flooding (photo is the Parramatta River)

“Every surface waste is avoided by taking water from 30 meters below the surface as a precaution,” said a WaterNSW spokesperson.

Two booms – also known as silt curtains – have been placed upstream of the dam to collect sludge before it reaches the dam itself.

Other dams in the Sydney metropolitan area, including the Nepean, Cataract, Avon and Woronora dams, have all received a welcome bonus, WaterNSW added.

The Tallowa dam in the Shoalhaven area is also starting to fill.

The six dams and dams that are in capacity are some of the smallest in the region, but they offer much optimism for the region.

Four of the dams are located in or deliver a drought-declared local government area: Leslie Harrison Dam, Nest Nerang Dam, Six Mile Creek and Wappa Dam.

The overcrowded Leslie Harrison Dam, supplying Redland City to the south of Brisbane, was recorded by 76 percent on Friday.

An overflowing marker can almost be seen underwater on the edge of the Parramatta River

An overflowing marker can almost be seen underwater on the edge of the Parramatta River

Rains flood the area near the Parramatta River in outer Sydney

Rains flood the area near the Parramatta River in outer Sydney

The two largest dams in the region, Wivenhoe and Sommerset, both had an increase of around one percent over the weekend.

The total dam level in South-East Queensland has risen by almost one percent after heavy rainfall during the weekend.

The water network in South-East Queensland is 57.2 percent after the rain shower during the weekend.

The main drinking facility for the Gold Coast, Hinze Dam, has reached 88.7 percent capacity from 86.3 percent for the weekend.

The city of Warwick, in southern Queensland, has had drinking water flowing into its dam for two years.

Leslie Dam, which supplies water to Warwick and surrounding communities, almost doubled its capacity at night.

On Saturday at 4:00 PM, SunWater registered the level of the dam at 7.66 percent.

By 10.30 a.m. on Sunday, it had risen to 12.64 percent.

Southern Downs Mayor Tracy Dobie told AAP that drinking water had flowed into Leslie Dam for two years.

“We had almost as much rain in January and February as in the whole of 2019,” Mrs. Dobie said.

The municipality of Stanthorpe near the border with NSW also received much needed rain.

The municipality officially ran out of drinking water in January and had to transport water from the Connolly dam 60 km to the north of the city.

Mrs. Dobie said that the AAP Connelly dam received good rain, but the city’s main stock, Storm King Dam, did not receive enough to stop the water transport.

“We have a month of water in Storm King Dam, but we need six months of rain to stop the transport,” she said.

Leslie Harrison Dam in southeastern Queensland is now spilling excess water and the outflows have increased

Leslie Harrison Dam in southeastern Queensland is now spilling excess water and the outflows have increased

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