The rise and fall of the Roman Empire were related to the amount of rain

In a new document, researchers have analyzed the link between the fall of the Roman Empire and the decreasing levels of rain. In the photo is La morte di Cesare by Vincenzo Camuccini

As heat waves are setting temperature records around the world, new research has revealed a worrying link between drought and the fall of empires.

In a new document, scientists discovered a link between the fall of the Roman Empire and the unprecedented drought throughout the ancient world.

According to the researchers, there is also a link between the lifespan of a Roman emperor and the amount of rain recorded during his reign.

Extreme weather events are related to political instability to this day, scientists say.

Military experts have previously warned that climate change could provoke a "humanitarian crisis of epic proportions," triggering massive migration, wars and threats to national security.

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In a new document, researchers have analyzed the link between the fall of the Roman Empire and the decreasing levels of rain. In the photo is La morte di Cesare by Vincenzo Camuccini

In a new document, researchers have analyzed the link between the fall of the Roman Empire and the decreasing levels of rain. In the photo is La morte di Cesare by Vincenzo Camuccini

Dr. Cornelius Christian of Brock University and Liam Elbourne of St Francis Xavier University analyzed the relationship between climate and murders.

The researchers collected data on rain by looking at the oak rings in France and Germany, writes The Economist.

Oak rings are sensitive to changes in precipitation and can reveal precise changes in the experience of the environment at certain times in history.

During seasons in which water and nutrients abound, trees register large growth rings.

However, rings grow in much tighter formations during periods when climatic conditions are less favorable.

The Roman economy was largely agricultural and, therefore, very dependent on rainfall.

The Roman Empire, which lasted from 27 BC to 476 AD, had a total of eighty-two emperors.

About 20 percent of these were victims of murders.

Of these, the murder of Julio César on March 15, 44 BC is one of the most notorious.

The emperor was stabbed a total of 23 times in the Ides of March, but only one of them, the second wound he received in the chest, was fatal to the 55-year-old man.

The researchers found that when rainfall is low, Roman troops die of hunger and are more likely to riot.

More riots were associated with more assassinations of Roman emperors.

The researchers found that when rainfall is low, Roman troops die of hunger and are more likely to riot. More riots were linked to more murders of Roman emperors

The researchers found that when rainfall is low, Roman troops die of hunger and are more likely to riot. More riots were linked to more murders of Roman emperors

The researchers found that when rainfall is low, Roman troops die of hunger and are more likely to riot. More riots were linked to more murders of Roman emperors

The researchers found that a 20 percent reduction in annual precipitation resulted in an increase in the standard deviation of 0.11 in the probability that an emperor would be killed the following year.

"A dictator relies on the support of his army, the blows to this support can threaten his rule," the researchers wrote in their article, published in Economics Letters.

"Motivated by this, we find that the least precipitation, along the northeast of the Roman Empire, predicts more assassinations of Roman emperors.

"Our proposed mechanism is the following: the lower precipitation increases the likelihood that Roman troops, who were dependent on local food supplies, will die of hunger.

"This pushes the soldiers to mutiny, which weakens the emperor's support and increases the likelihood that he will be killed."

Although the evidence suggests that the amount of rain is related to the number of murders, the researchers admit that other factors would have played a role.

"A hungry army is probably not the only determinant of the violent death of a Roman emperor," the researchers wrote.

"However, we explained a possible forcing variable, which may increase political instability within the Roman Empire, and other factors may also have played a role."

In the photo is the Colosseum in Rome. The Roman Empire, which lasted from 27 BC to 476 AD, had a total of eighty-two emperors. About 20 percent of them were killed

In the photo is the Colosseum in Rome. The Roman Empire, which lasted from 27 BC to 476 AD, had a total of eighty-two emperors. About 20 percent of them were killed

In the photo is the Colosseum in Rome. The Roman Empire, which lasted from 27 BC to 476 AD, had a total of eighty-two emperors. About 20 percent of them were killed

Extreme weather events are still related to political instability.

In 2016, Brigadier General Stephen Cheney, executive director of the American Security Project and member of the board of foreign policy affairs of the US Department of State, said: "Climate change could lead to a humanitarian crisis of epic proportions. .

"We are already seeing the migration of a large number of people around the world due to food shortages, water insecurity and extreme weather, and this will become the new normal."

The impacts of rising temperatures, such as droughts, are acting to increase instability at the European gateway, with direct links to climate change in the Syrian war, the Arab Spring and the Boko Haram terrorist insurgency in Africa, the general said. of Cheney Brigade.

WHEN DID THE ROMANS WORK GREAT BRITAIN?

55BC – Julio César crossed the channel with around 10,000 soldiers. They landed on a beach in Deal and encountered a British force. Cesar was forced to retire.

54BC – César crossed the channel with 27,000 infantry and cavalry. Again they landed in the agreement, but they had no opposition. They marched inland and after hard battles they defeated the British and the main tribal leaders surrendered.

However, later that year, Cesar was forced to return to Gaul to deal with the problems there and the Romans left.

54BC – 43BC – Although there were no Romans present in Britain during these years, their influence increased due to commercial ties.

43AD – A Roman force of 40,000 led by Aulus Plautius landed in Kent and took the southeast. Emperor Claudius arrived in Colchester with reinforcements. Claudius appointed Plautius governor of Great Britain and returned to Rome.

47 AD – Londinium (London) was founded and Great Britain was declared part of the Roman Empire. Road networks were built throughout the country.

75 – 77AD – The Romans defeated the last resistant tribes, turning all of Britain into Roman. Many Britons began to adopt Roman customs and laws.

122 AD – Emperor Hadrian ordered the construction of a wall between England and Scotland to keep the Scottish tribes away.

312AD – Emperor Constantine legalized Christianity throughout the Roman Empire.

228AD – The Romans were being attacked by barbarian tribes and soldiers stationed in the country began to be called to Rome.

410 AD – All Romans were called to Rome and Emperor Honorious told the British that they no longer had a connection with Rome.

Source: History in the network

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