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The 93-year-old queen looked stylish in a bold blue dress and pearls when she arrived at a reception to celebrate the work of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust today at Buckingham Palace in London

Her Majesty and the Countess of Wessex celebrated the success of the Diamond Jubilee Trust at a glittering Buckingham Palace reception tonight.

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The queen, 93, looked stylish in a bold blue dress with long sleeves with sparkling thread and decorated with pearls.

The monarch completed her outfit with her trusted pair of black shoes and held a leather bag in one hand and glass in the other.

Meanwhile, Sophie Wessex, 54, Deputy Patron of the Trust, wore a white dress and heels – and paid tribute to the work of the charity, which helped to keep sight of more than 22 million people in just five years .

The 93-year-old queen looked stylish in a bold blue dress and pearls when she arrived at a reception to celebrate the work of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust today at Buckingham Palace in London

The 93-year-old queen looked stylish in a bold blue dress and pearls when she arrived at a reception to celebrate the work of The Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust today at Buckingham Palace in London

The monarch attended the glittering reception to support the work of the Diamond Jubilee Trust in preventing blindness and its vice-patron Sophie Wessex, the Countess of Wessex

The monarch attended the glittering reception to support the work of the Diamond Jubilee Trust in preventing blindness and its vice-patron Sophie Wessex, the Countess of Wessex

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The monarch attended the glittering reception to support the work of the Diamond Jubilee Trust in preventing blindness and its vice-patron Sophie Wessex, the Countess of Wessex

The mission of the Trust was established in 2012 by the Commonwealth Heads of Government as a temporary foundation for charities. The purpose of the Trust is to curb avoidable blindness and to enable a new generation of young leaders – The Queen & # 39; s Young Leaders.

With a timeframe of five years, the & # 39; s programs have contributed to enriching the lives of people in the Commonwealth.

The Trust will close as planned in 2020, and its mission lives on to those it has supported, and those it has equipped to keep changing lives in the future.

Tonight's reception brought staff, supporters, partners, and beneficiaries – including front ophthalmologists and Commonwealth eye health experts – together to celebrate the Trust's performance.

Sophie took the opportunity to pay tribute to her & # 39; dear Mama & # 39 ;, the affectionate nickname she has for her mother-in-law.

The king has been campaigning for 20 years to curb blindness around the world and the queen personally asked her to lead the trust's work to commemorate the queen's 60 years as head of the Commonwealth.

The queen looked stylish when she appeared at the event - bringing staff, supporters, partners and beneficiaries together - in a bold blue dress with her leather handbag
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The queen looked stylish when she appeared at the event - bringing staff, supporters, partners and beneficiaries together - in a bold blue dress with her leather handbag

The queen looked stylish when she appeared at the event – bringing staff, supporters, partners and beneficiaries together – in a bold blue dress with her leather handbag

Her majesty completed the outfit with a pair of black shoes and was also pictured with a glass in one hand while attending the evening

Her majesty completed the outfit with a pair of black shoes and was also pictured with a glass in one hand while attending the evening

Her majesty completed the outfit with a pair of black shoes and was also pictured with a glass in one hand while attending the evening

At the reception, attended by 200 people who all met the queen in person, she said: & I feel in a way that I have been your eyes, who have traveled to Malawi, Bangladesh and India to do the work of the Trust see first-hand, witness the ambitious initiatives being implemented in the name of your majesty, and ensure that the intended legacy would be real and long-lasting. & # 39;

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& # 39; I am very happy to say that your majesty's honor is more than confirmed. & # 39;

& # 39; The Trust has focused on tackling curable eye diseases, including diabetic retinopathy, early retinopathy and a particularly widespread and painful eye defect, blinding trachoma. & # 39;

& # 39; This old disease, which even justifies mentioning it in the Bible, is one of the most common and out of control eye diseases the world has known, and now, over the Commonwealth and beyond, it is fleeing. & # 39;

Sophie continued: & # 39; Mama, when I returned from my travels, I am so proud to share the work I saw under the umbrella of the Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Trust and caring for so many people who work so hard to save and heal eyesight.

& # 39; Every time you listened with interest and wanted to hear how the work is going, and every time I am astonished because you have shared with me your deep knowledge of each of these countries, not top-level observations, but personal experience, again and again the real affection that you have for all the people of the Commonwealth and why that affection is given back to you so abundantly. & # 39;

The Countess of Wessex told the 200 guests gathered that trust has focused on tackling curable eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and blinding trachoma, which is particularly widespread
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The Countess of Wessex told the 200 guests gathered that trust has focused on tackling curable eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and blinding trachoma, which is particularly widespread

The Countess of Wessex told the 200 guests gathered that trust has focused on tackling curable eye diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity and blinding trachoma, which is particularly widespread

Queen Elizabeth II made sure that she greeted each guest personally on the glittering evening

Queen Elizabeth II made sure that she greeted each guest personally on the glittering evening

Queen Elizabeth II made sure that she greeted each guest personally on the glittering evening

She added: & # 39; On your 21st birthday, during a tour to South Africa, you made a promise to devote your life to the service of the Commonwealth. & # 39;

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& # 39; Since then, you have fulfilled this promise in so many ways, but I believe that your Diamond Jubilee Trust has given your majesty the opportunity to show your commitment in a tangible and practical way that reflects the lives of people in the Commonwealth will be felt enriched by future generations. & # 39;

Since 2014, the Trust has assisted more than 22 million people in Africa and the Pacific to receive vital antibiotics to combat trachoma – & # 39; the world's leading infectious cause of blindness – and assisted Malawi and Vanuatu in removing it risk of the disease.

Both are on schedule to be certified as being eliminated by the World Health Organization.

The Trust has given face-saving surgery to more than 104,000 people suffering from trachoma trichiasis and made sure that nearly 19,200 people have received treatment to prevent vision loss due to diabetes.

Britain's longest serving monarch came to show its support for the Trust - which helped more than 22 million people in Africa and the Pacific fight blindness

Britain's longest serving monarch came to show its support for the Trust - which helped more than 22 million people in Africa and the Pacific fight blindness

Britain's longest serving monarch came to show its support for the Trust – which helped more than 22 million people in Africa and the Pacific fight blindness

The 93-year-old became tonight as & # 39; mama & # 39; greeted by her daughter-in-law, a nickname used by the Countess of Wessex to show her affection for the monarch

The 93-year-old became tonight as & # 39; mama & # 39; greeted by her daughter-in-law, a nickname used by the Countess of Wessex to show her affection for the monarch

The 93-year-old became tonight as & # 39; mama & # 39; greeted by her daughter-in-law, a nickname used by the Countess of Wessex to show her affection for the monarch

Trachoma is a bacterial condition that starts as conjunctivitis and is easy to treat with antibiotics if it is treated early.

It has been wiped out in developed countries, but endemic in developing countries, partly due to poor sanitation, and the trust has done an incredible job of helping so many people in a short period of time.

The director of the Trust, Dr. Astrid Bonfield said:

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& # 39; During the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in 2012, they wanted to thank the queen and the best way to do this was a good cause.

& # 39; The British government contributed £ 50 million through DFID and we were able to match that, which was fantastic. & # 39; It was a very bold and fantastic gesture.

& # 39; From the first day, confidence would always be limited: only five years. We have reached more than 22 million people in Africa and beyond in collaboration with people such as places of interest.

Four out of five people who are blind need not be, 80 percent is a hair-raising statistic.

& # 39; In Malawi three years ago, 8 million people were at risk of becoming blind, now it is zero.

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& # 39; The numbers that have been helped are just that large and we have made tangible differences.

& # 39; Would we have achieved so much without a finish line? Probably not.

& # 39; We have had this opportunity in the name of the queen and it was our duty to maximize it

& # 39; The Countess has also been instrumental and it is a subject that has been dear to her for a long time. & # 39;

Sophie has met many of the beneficiaries on three separate journeys with confidence to India, Malawi and Bangladesh.

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During a reception after the Countess' speech, the Queen told the guests that she had the Trust & # 39; great & # 39; found.

& # 39; When John [Sir John Major] spoke to me about setting up the trust, I hadn't realized how bad it was [the issue of avoidable blindness] & # 39 ;, she said smiling.

& # 39; And if something seems to be spreading. What it [the confidence] has achieved is remarkable. & # 39;

The Queen's Young Leaders program has also recognized 240 exceptional young people aged 18-29 from the Commonwealth who transform the lives of others.

Every year from 2014 to 2018, 60 exceptional young people are selected to receive a Queen & # 39; s Young Leaders Award and & # 39; Queen & # 39; s Young Leaders & # 39; – one for each year that The Queen had served as the head of Commonwealth at the time of her Diamond Jubilee.

The Queen's young leaders are a unique, dedicated and powerful group of young people from 53 Commonwealth countries who will continue to connect, collaborate and change lives in the coming years.

Commonwealth government leaders endorsed these goals when they met in 2013 in Sri Lanka. The Queen's Young Leaders program and initiatives to put an end to preventable forms of blindness were formally launched in 2014.

The Countess of Wessex became vice-patron of the Trust on the occasion of her 50th birthday and has since visited Malawi, Bangladesh and India to view the work of the Trust to tackle preventable blindness firsthand.

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