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The murderer of Tennessee who will be executed by an electric chair will receive a final meal with pork chops

A prisoner in the death row in Tennessee who will die from an electric chair received his last meal three hours before his planned execution on Thursday evening at 8 p.m.

Nicholas Sutton, 58, ordered fried pork chops, mashed potatoes with gravy, and peach pie with vanilla ice cream, the Tennessee Department of Correction said. Prisoners in death row usually have a $ 20 limit on their last meal.

Sutton’s fate was sealed on Wednesday when Governor Bill Lee of Tennessee said he would not grant him leniency – despite the fact that the prisoner received support from relatives of his victims and former and current prison workers.

Nicholas Sutton, 58, received his last meal three hours before he was executed on Thursday evening in the maximum security prison in Nashville.

Nicholas Sutton, 58, received his last meal three hours before he was executed on Thursday evening in the maximum security prison in Nashville.

Sutton was sentenced to death in 1986 for murdering fellow prisoner Carl Estep in a conflict over a drug deal in a prison in East Tennessee.

He is to be executed in a prison with maximum security in Nashville, where he was moved to a cell next to the death room on Tuesday and guarded 24 hours a day.

Sutton has chosen to die in the electric chair, an option in Tennessee for prisoners whose crimes were committed before 1999. If executed, Sutton would be the fifth person to die in the state’s electric chair in the last 16 months.

Estep’s eldest daughter said that Sutton did her family a favor when he killed her father, whom she describes as a “bad man.”

Rosemary Hall said her father, who was in jail for raping her step sister when he died, set fire to their home and deliberately caused a traffic accident that killed her sister.

Former prison Former correction Lt. Tony Eden (center) is depicted with Nicholas Sutton and his wife Reba on their wedding day in 1994. Eden described Sutton as “the most rehabilitated prisoner I met and worked in a prison with maximum security” and said he saved his life in a rel

She described his death as a blessing. “To say that this was the best day of my life is an understatement,” she said in a statement included in Sutton’s leniency petition.

“I felt that a weight of 100 pounds had been lifted off my shoulders and I thought to myself:” There is a God! “

She called Estep a “bad man” and accused him of setting fire to their home and deliberately causing a traffic accident that killed her sister. Estep was in jail for raping Hall’s step sister when Sutton killed him, she said.

Despite Hall’s support, Governor Lee decided to continue Sutton’s execution.

Tennessee Govenor Bill Lee refused to grant leniency to Sutton on Wednesday when his legal options to escape execution declined

Tennessee Govenor Bill Lee refused to grant leniency to Sutton on Wednesday when his legal options to escape execution declined

Tennessee Govenor Bill Lee refused to grant leniency to Sutton on Wednesday when his legal options to escape execution declined

Three men have been executed since Governor Lee took office, including one who became a devout Christian and religious leader while in prison.

“After careful consideration of Nicholas Sutton’s request for leniency and a thorough review of the case, I hold the state of Tennessee high and I will not intervene,” he said Wednesday.

At the time of Estep’s murder, Sutton had been serving time for killing three people, including his grandmother, in 1979.

In his leniency petition, friends described a childhood characterized by abandonment, abuse and neglect. They said he later turned to drug abuse.

Former correction Lt. Tony Eden said Sutton had been reformed since he was imprisoned as a teenager.

“I can confidently state that Nick Sutton is the most rehabilitated prisoner I have met over 30 years in maximum security prisons,” he said.

Eden believes that Sutton may have saved his life during a prison riot in 1985 by confronting a group of armed prisoners trying to hold Eden hostage.

“If Nick Sutton is released tomorrow, I would welcome him to my house and invite him to be my neighbor,” wrote Eden.

Former counselor Cheryl Donaldson also believes that Sutton saved her life when he came into action and called for help after she slipped and hit her hard on a concrete prison floor.

Donaldson also described how the murder of her own brother led to a very frank conversation with Sutton.

An electric chair at the Riverbend Maximum Security Institution under the jurisdiction of Tennessee's Correction Department in Nashville. He would be the fifth person to die in the state by electric chair since 2018

An electric chair at the Riverbend Maximum Security Institution under the jurisdiction of Tennessee's Correction Department in Nashville. He would be the fifth person to die in the state by electric chair since 2018

An electric chair at the Riverbend Maximum Security Institution under the jurisdiction of Tennessee’s Correction Department in Nashville. He would be the fifth person to die in the state by electric chair since 2018

“Nick told me he was deeply sorry for his crimes, constantly thinking about his mistakes, his victims and their families, and being haunted by the lives he took,” Donaldson said.

The mother of Paul House, a former death cell prisoner who was later released when a judge destroyed his conviction based on new evidence, said last week that she was doing everything she could to plead for Sutton. She said Sutton took care of her son after developing multiple sclerosis in prison, including helping him eat and showering.

“I’m telling you that my son would be dead if Nick wasn’t there,” Joyce House said in a telephone interview.

Relatives of another Sutton victim, Charles Almon, were also among those who asked for mercy. Almon’s nephew and namesake, Charles Maynard, said his close-knit family never survived the death of his uncle, but the last few months have been particularly painful as Sutton’s execution date approaches.

Maynard said he does not think that performing Sutton will solve anything. “It just ends my uncle’s story with another murder,” Maynard said in a telephone interview.

He said he and his daughter Anna Lee are considering attending a vigil that Tennesseans will hold for alternatives to the death penalty if the execution continues.

In 1985, Sutton served time in 1979 at the Morgan County Regional Correction Facility for three murders.

As the prison guards changed duty on January 15, Sutton and Thomas Street entered Estep’s cell and stabbed him 38 times in the chest and neck with two home-made knives, the prosecutors said.

One of the prisoners also said that Estep was a marijuana trader at the facility that had sold the men “bad merchandise” and refused to refund their money. He testified that after the men took over the watch from Estep, Estep threatened to kill Sutton.

In 1986, a Morgan County jury convicted Sutton of first-degree murder and sentenced him to death. Street was sentenced and sentenced to life imprisonment. A third man accused of participating in the attack was acquitted.

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