The judge tells the woman to return an $ 40,000 commitment ring that she refused to return

Give it back: Rodney Ripley, 54, proposed to Jennifer Rutten, 50, on December 5, 2011, but separated less than a year later. A judge has now ordered him to return the $ 40,000 ring (no photo)

A New York judge ordered a woman to return an expensive engagement ring to her ex-fiance, five years after the man filed a lawsuit against her to recover the rock.

Rodney Ripley, 54, proposed to Jennifer Rutten, 50, on December 5, 2011. However, less than a year later, the couple separated and Ripley asked for the ring back, but Rutten refused. .

"I was dealing with the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy and started harassing me," he complained, according to the New York Post.

Give it back: Rodney Ripley, 54, proposed to Jennifer Rutten, 50, on December 5, 2011, but separated less than a year later. A judge has now ordered him to return the $ 40,000 ring (no photo)

Give it back: Rodney Ripley, 54, proposed to Jennifer Rutten, 50, on December 5, 2011, but separated less than a year later. A judge has now ordered him to return the $ 40,000 ring (no photo)

Ripley and Rutten are both from Wisconsin, but Ripley proposed on the Brooklyn Bridge because Rutten was in New York at the time, working for the American Red Cross.

He gave her a 3-carat Tacori sparkler cut with a cushion and she kept the receipt for $ 39,057.10. He also had him insured for $ 40,000.

When they separated and he asked for it several times, but she did not return it, then he sued.

The legal battle lasted for five years, when Rutten and his lawyer tried numerous tactics to deny the ring to Ripley.

First, they argued that the ring was worth less than Ripley said, only $ 13,000, which would make it less than the $ 25,000 required to file a civil lawsuit.

After Ripley delivered a receipt proving that the lawsuit should go forward, Rutten claimed that New York had no jurisdiction, because she did not live there. That tactic did not work either.

Then he accused his ex of being abusive, which, even if it were true, would not have legally entitled him to the ring.

"As far as I remember, he became more angry, became more typically abusive, emotionally abusive," he said. "I was angry, I did not want to return it."

In 2016, Bradley Moss and Amy Bzura (pictured) broke their commitment. A judge ordered Bzura to return the ring. He also sued the Moss family to pay part of the wedding

In 2016, Bradley Moss and Amy Bzura (pictured) broke their commitment. A judge ordered Bzura to return the ring. He also sued the Moss family to pay part of the wedding

In 2016, Bradley Moss and Amy Bzura (pictured) broke their commitment. A judge ordered Bzura to return the ring. He also sued the Moss family to pay part of the wedding

In the state of New York, a ring is not considered legally as a gift, but as a condition for marriage. That means that if a marriage is canceled, the person who bought it has the legal right to it.

Similar stipulations exist in Iowa, Florida, Kansas, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, New Jersey, and New Mexico. Only in Montana there is an engagement ring considered an absolute gift.

"Here the indisputable facts show that the ring was delivered in the contemplation of marriage and that the marriage did not happen," Judge Robert Reed wrote in his decision. & # 39; Therefore, Ripley is entitled to the return of the ring & # 39;

Ripley's diamond suit is not the only one that has made headlines in recent years.

In 2016, Bradley Moss, then 31, and Amy Bzura, 27, broke their engagement the night before their wedding, when a hand fight broke out during dinner.

The families of the couples argued over who would pay the $ 325,000 wedding bill that was canceled.

It intensified when Bzura's family sued Moss for $ 89,919, which was the cost of the 79 guests the Moss family had invited. Moss then sued Bzura for the $ 125,000 return ring.

Months later, the courts dictate that Bzura had to return the emerald cut diamond.

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