The Japanese photographer shares intimate photos of his small room where his family of six lives

For some, the very thought of being cramped under the same roof as our brothers and fathers can be claustrophobic and frustrating.

But for Japanese photographer Masaki Yamamoto, it may seem like a spacious and liberating experience.

Yamamoto grew up in Kobe, Japan, where he, his four brothers, mother and father, lived in a one-room apartment of approximately 7.5 square meters, large for 18 years.

The family slept next to each other every night, surrounded by their belongings. The photographer told the New Yorker that the bathtub was the bastion of privacy in the home, and nowhere else was it safe from prying eyes or interruptions.

While these living conditions would lead some families to drink, Yamamoto has shared an intimate selection of photographs that show his happy and close family around his small house.

Yamamoto does not hide the bad parts of his education. When he was eight years old, before the one-bedroom apartment, the family was evicted from his apartment in Kobe.

The seven lived off a car before he and his brothers went to a children's home for a while while their parents were back on their feet.

The images, taken between 2014 and 2017, are from his new book, entitled Guts, and provide an idea of ​​the good and the bad of living in addition to the ones you love.

Masaki Yamamoto, his four brothers and their parents lived in a one-bedroom apartment in Kobe, Japan, for 18 years.

Masaki Yamamoto, his four brothers and their parents lived in a one-bedroom apartment in Kobe, Japan, for 18 years.

Masaki Yamamoto, his four brothers and their parents lived in a one-bedroom apartment in Kobe, Japan, for 18 years.

Her parents and five children slept very close together, surrounded by limbs and a growing pile of belongings and trash (in the photo, Yamamoto's mother and one of her children).

Her parents and five children slept very close together, surrounded by limbs and a growing pile of belongings and trash (in the photo, Yamamoto's mother and one of her children).

Her parents and five children slept very close together, surrounded by limbs and a growing pile of belongings and trash (in the photo, Yamamoto's mother and one of her children).

Despite the proximity, the Yamamoto family took full advantage of what they had, remembering when times were worse and all seven lived in a car.

Despite the proximity, the Yamamoto family took full advantage of what they had, remembering when times were worse and all seven lived in a car.

Despite the proximity, the Yamamoto family took full advantage of what they had, remembering when times were worse and all seven lived in a car.

Yamamoto says that most of his furniture was found in the streets, but before that his father made cabinets with cardboard boxes.

Yamamoto says that most of his furniture was found in the streets, but before that his father made cabinets with cardboard boxes.

Yamamoto says that most of his furniture was found in the streets, but before that his father made cabinets with cardboard boxes.

Like most families, Yamamoto finds pleasure and joy in food. On the left, the photographer's mother is seen licking sticky rice from her fingers. Right, your younger brother eats slowly before going to night high school

Yamamoto's brother once caught a yellowtail fish and brought it home for the family to eat

Yamamoto's brother once caught a yellowtail fish and brought it home for the family to eat

Yamamoto's brother once caught a yellowtail fish and brought it home for the family to eat

Yamamoto's mother, who works as a supermarket cashier, is seen taking a photograph of her eye after surgery

Yamamoto's mother, who works as a supermarket cashier, is seen taking a photograph of her eye after surgery

Yamamoto's mother, who works as a supermarket cashier, is seen taking a photograph of her eye after surgery

Although her sister seems sad, Yamamoto says that she was joking at that moment, raising her knees to give the appearance of a generous chest. On the right, his father is seen shaving his head in the kitchen of the family

Despite his unique struggles, Yamamoto says his family argued like any other. Here, the couple is fighting over who will cut the cake, since dirty bowls and an ashtray surround them

Despite his unique struggles, Yamamoto says his family argued like any other. Here, the couple is fighting over who will cut the cake, since dirty bowls and an ashtray surround them

Despite his unique struggles, Yamamoto says his family argued like any other. Here, the couple is fighting over who will cut the cake, since dirty bowls and an ashtray surround them

Yamamoto says that this photo represents his family more. He says that Guts is not only about hardness, but about the intertwined nature of the guts. "When we were expelled from our previous apartment, when we had to live in the car, when we spent the weekends with our parents during our stay in a children's institution, or during the eighteen years we spent in this one-piece apartment. We spend our lives like this, "he told Slate. "I feel that this photo represents the origin of my photography, I left it and I will always return to it".

Yamamoto says that this photo represents his family more. He says that Guts is not only about hardness, but about the intertwined nature of the guts. "When we were expelled from our previous apartment, when we had to live in the car, when we spent the weekends with our parents during our stay in a children's institution, or during the eighteen years we spent in this one-piece apartment. We spend our lives like this, "he told Slate. "I feel that this photo represents the origin of my photography, I left it and I will always return to it".

Yamamoto says that this photo represents his family more. He says that Guts is not only about hardness, but about the intertwined nature of the guts. "When we were expelled from our previous apartment, when we had to live in the car, when we spent the weekends with our parents during our stay in a children's institution, or during the eighteen years we spent in this one-piece apartment. We spend our lives like this, "he told Slate. "I feel that this photo represents the origin of my photography, I left it and I will always return to it".

.