The Church of England is withdrawing advice for having a Maundy Thursday meal at home after backlash

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The Church of England has withdrawn its advice for organizing an Easter meal at home after backlash from priests and rabbis over claims that she “appropriated” the Jewish Seder tradition.

The guidelines were issued on how Maundy Thursday – which marks the start of the three-day celebration of Easter – can be celebrated at home in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

It called for families to come to the table with a bowl of warm water, flat bread, honey, and a sprig of rosemary, before being encouraged to say, “This is the night that God delivered His people Israel from bondage and oppression in Egypt.”

But the guide, which also included a recipe for flatbread, has been criticized for “ appropriating ” Judaism’s “ liturgy ” for its similarities to the Seder – a meal shared by Jewish people on Passover and the preparation of unleavened bread bread, bitter herbs and salt water.

The Church of England has since withdrawn the advice and apologized “for any violation caused.”

The Church of England guidelines were issued on celebrating Maundy Thursday - the start of the three-day celebration of Easter - at home amid the coronavirus pandemic.

The Church of England guidelines were issued on celebrating Maundy Thursday – the start of the three-day celebration of Easter – at home amid the coronavirus pandemic.

A document entitled Prayer At Home, published by the Church of England, stated: “ This short form of prayer is intended to be used in the home by those who cannot gather with others to seek the Holy Spirit during this time of the pandemic. to celebrate. Communion on Maundy Thursday evening.

While the prayers and deeds reflect motives of the Jewish Seder, this is not one of those meals.

“Jewish people will understand the resonance of the symbols and practices in very different ways than Christians.”

The church also promoted a Facebook event on Wednesday, in addition to a screenshot of a video, which was never published, that appeared to show a family participating in a Christian seder.

But members of the clergy have claimed that the counseling was inappropriate.

The Church of England has withdrawn her advice after backlash from priests and rabbis over claims that she had 'appropriated' the Jewish Seder tradition

The Church of England has withdrawn her advice after backlash from priests and rabbis over claims that she had 'appropriated' the Jewish Seder tradition

The Church of England has withdrawn its advice after backlash from priests and rabbis over claims that it had ‘appropriated’ the Jewish Seder tradition

Father Nick Nawrockyi, Dean of Grimsby and Cleethorpes, shared a screenshot of the event with a caption that read, ‘Eek! @Churchofengland’s offer for Maundy Thursday online looks alarmingly like a “Christian Seder”. ‘

Dr. Jo Kershaw, pastor of St Anne’s Wrenthorpe in Wakefield, retweeted, adding: ‘A) it is wrong (and harmful) to steal a Jewish ritual. We have our own.

B) they may say this is not a Christian seder, but the duck test (if he walks and quacks like a duck …) applies, and that is certainly not what a normal Anglican Eucharist looks like. ‘

Priest Malcolm French added: ‘So, @churchofengland, @JustinWelby, what exactly are you going to do about this?

“Cosplaying other people’s rituals is inappropriate, especially since we have been repeatedly asked not to.”

And Rabbi Debbie Young-Somers, from London, wrote: “ I am very encouraged by the many Christians in my timeline asking people not to usurp #passover #seder before Easter. Thank you…’

The guide was criticized for appropriating Judaism's `` liturgy '' for its similarities to Seder - a meal shared by Jewish people during Passover that includes the preparation of unleavened bread, bitter herbs, and salt water (pictured)

The guide was criticized for appropriating Judaism's `` liturgy '' for its similarities to Seder - a meal shared by Jewish people during Passover that includes the preparation of unleavened bread, bitter herbs, and salt water (pictured)

The guide was criticized for appropriating Judaism’s “ liturgy ” for its similarities to Seder – a meal shared by Jewish people during Passover that includes the preparation of unleavened bread, bitter herbs, and salt water (pictured)

The Church of England has since withdrawn the guidelines and “apologized for any violation caused.”

The Reverend Dr. Richard Sudworth, the Church of England’s national counselor on interfaith affairs, said: “The short prayers and actions are not, and were not intended to be, a Christianized seder, as the text indicated.

Nor was this intended to replace the personal celebration of the Eucharist, which we so long for. Rather, this was a sacrifice to families to be able to pray and communicate from generation to generation.

The prayers and talks were offered to help families be aware of the events of the original Last Supper, and the framework context of the Passover feast for Jesus and the disciples, in conjunction with our Christian scriptures for this day.

However, we do not want to create an impression that was not intended by the source and apologize for the violation caused.

“As we prepare for Easter, we want to greet everyone in the Jewish community as they celebrate Passover.”

MailOnline has contacted the Church Of England for further comment.