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Teenagers do their homework less often when their mothers speak to them at a & # 39; controlling & # 39; show because it takes away their sense of choice & # 39 ;, research suggests (stock)

Teenagers do their homework less often when their mothers tell them in a controlling tone & # 39; because it takes away their sense of choice & # 39;

  • Teenagers listened to the same set of instructions in different tones
  • They were more likely to do their homework if they were asked in an encouraging way
  • Coaxes compliance when they have an & # 39; increasing desire to act independently & # 39;
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Teenagers do their homework less often when their mothers speak to them at a & # 39; controlling & # 39; show, research suggests.

Scientists at Cardiff University have analyzed how 1,000 adolescents responded to the same instructions as given by women with different voices.

They found that the teenagers were more willing to do their homework if they were spoken in an encouraging way.

Supportive tones are thought to give teens a & # 39; sense of choice & # 39; even if they are told to do something.

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This can persuade them to meet a time when they have an & # 39; increasing desire to act independently & # 39; and & # 39; self-reliant & # 39; the scientists said.

Teenagers do their homework less often when their mothers speak to them at a & # 39; controlling & # 39; show because it takes away their sense of choice & # 39 ;, research suggests (stock)

Teenagers do their homework less often when their mothers speak to them at a & # 39; controlling & # 39; show because it takes away their sense of choice & # 39 ;, research suggests (stock)

& # 39; If parents want conversations with their teenagers to be most beneficial, it is important to remember that they use supportive tones, & # 39; said lead author Dr. Netta Weinstein.

& # 39; It is easy for parents to forget, especially if they feel stressed, tired or under pressure.

& # 39; Adolescents are likely to feel more involved and happier, and as a result they try harder at school when parents and teachers speak supportively rather than pressurize. & # 39;

Parents often try to motivate their children to behave in a certain way, the scientists wrote in the journal Developmental Psychology.

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Encouraging them to do their homework is a & # 39; common challenge & # 39 ;. Research suggests that this can affect how well young people do at school.

& # 39; Very little research & # 39; however, has investigated the role of voices in compliance.

For more information, the scientists analyzed 486 boys and 514 girls between the ages of 14 and 15.

The teenagers were placed in two groups where they heard identical messages spoken by women with adolescent children.

Thirty messages were delivered, including & # 39; it's now time to go to school & # 39 ;, & # 39; you are reading this book tonight & # 39; and & # 39; you'll do well with this command & # 39 ;.

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The tone used was controlling, supportive or neutral.

All teenagers were asked how they would feel if their own mother had spoken to them like that.

The results showed that those who heard motivational statements heard in a controlling tone, & # 39; unwanted & # 39; responded.

Supporting tones, on the other hand, brought & # 39; positive responses & # 39; cause. This is compared with motivational messages that are delivered in a neutral way.

It is said that encouraging tones & # 39; inviting & # 39; and a & # 39; sense of choice & # 39; suggest to the listener, even if they are told to do something, the scientists wrote.

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Teenagers can be particularly susceptible to this because they are sensitive to the feeling of being controlled in view of their increasing desire to act independently and become self-reliant.

& # 39; These results nicely illustrate how powerful our voice is and that choosing the right tone to communicate is crucial in all our conversations, & # 39; said Dr. Weinstein.

The scientists plan to investigate whether tone of voice influences physiological responses, such as heartbeat, and how long these effects can last.

HOW DOES THE PRICE WE TALK SOCIAL CUES WORK ON LISTENERS?

The linguistic and social judgments we make when hearing speech are based on intonation.

Just as we have a mental image of what an apple looks like, we form mental representations of the personalities of others according to the acoustic properties of their voices.

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Prosody is a term that refers to the patterns that can be found in the human voice during speech.

It comes from the sounds of syllables and how they work with and against each other to give unconscious signals.

For example, intonation, tone, stress and rhythm are all very important in accurately displaying a message to other people.

Prosody is used to turn a statement into a question, to show sarcasm and irony, and people can also detect a person's way of thinking through their voice.

Social groups are adept at detecting these signals and can understand the subtleties of a conversation through intonation and emphasis.

It is believed that how this evolved stems from the origin of language.

Charles Darwin claimed that all languages ​​of the world can come from a kind of singing that our ancestors used to express their emotions.

Research with & # 39; show-deaf & # 39; people have shown that Darwin was right and that music and language both came from a common language.

Language and music use the same part of the brain and this shows that developing and understanding the flexible and fluid prosody of human language is a developed trait common to all people.

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