Teenage Tyrannosaurus rex bones reveal how they have grown into ‘splattering, crushing monsters’

Teenage Tyrannosaurus rex bones reveal how the “king of the dinosaurs” grew from slender and slender beasts to “bulky bone-breakers”

  • The Tyrannosaurus rex bones were found in early 2000 in Montana, USA.
  • The bones were considerably smaller than other bones and called Jane and Petey
  • They discovered that the teenager T.Rex could stop his growth rate in lean food years

Bones that belong to two ‘teenage’ tyrannosaurus rex dinosaurs give new clues about how these predators grew into ‘debilitating bone-breakers’.

In the early 2000s, fossil skeletons from two relatively small T. Rex were discovered in Carter County, Montana, USA and were called Jane and Petey.

A new study, in which very thin slices of bone fragment were taken from the remains “confirmed the theory that they were young T.Rex” and not a pygmy Nanotyrannus as previously thought.

Researchers say the study helped to get a more detailed picture of the growth and life of the huge dinosaurs.

Scroll down for video

The skull of the young T. rex, “Jane,” was slender with knife-like teeth, not yet grown large enough to crush bone

The study of two ‘juvenile’ Tyrannosaurus rex by researchers at Oklahoma State University enabled researchers to better understand their growth rate.

The team discovered that the teenager T.Rex was able to stop their growth if there wasn’t that much food at a certain time.

They would otherwise grow as fast as modern mammals and birds.

Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex was fleet-footed with knife-like teeth, dominated mid-carnivore knowledge before growing up to become the giant, bone-crushing king of dinosaurs

Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex was fleet-footed with knife-like teeth, dominated mid-carnivore knowledge before growing up to become the giant, bone-crushing king of dinosaurs

Juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex was fleet-footed with knife-like teeth, dominated mid-carnivore knowledge before growing up to become the giant, bone-crushing king of dinosaurs

Jane and Petey are being held by the Burpee Museum of Natural History in Rockford, Illinois and would have been slightly longer than a draft horse.

“Historically, many museums would collect the largest, most impressive fossils of a dinosaur species for display and ignore others,” said lead author Holly Woodward.

“The problem is that those smaller fossils can be from younger animals. So we have had great gaps in our understanding of how dinosaurs grew up for a long time. “

The smaller size of Jane and Petey is what makes the research team so incredibly important.

“Not only can scientists now study how bones and proportions changed as T. rex grew, but they can also use paleohistology – the study of fossil bone microstructure – to find out more about the growth rates and ages of young people.”

Dr. Woodward and her team removed thin slices from the bones of Jane and Petey and examined them at a high magnification.

“It’s always amazing to me to discover that if you have something like a huge fossilized dinosaur bone, it is also fossilized at the microscopic level,” she said.

“By comparing these fossilized microstructures with similar characteristics in modern bone, we know that they provide indications for metabolism, growth rate and age.”

A thin slice of bone was removed from the tibia (shin) of the T. rex, “Jane,” and examined with a microscope. Bone tissue shows that Jane was a teenager and was still growing when it died

Main author, Dr. Holly Woodward, explains the bone structure of Jane's tibia projected on a microscope screen and points to a growth ring in the bone

Main author, Dr. Holly Woodward, explains the bone structure of Jane's tibia projected on a microscope screen and points to a growth ring in the bone

Main author, Dr. Holly Woodward, explains the microstructure of the bone tissue of Jane’s tibia, projected on a microscope screen, and points to a growth ring in the bone

They found that they were in fact juvenile T.Rex due to the amount of time the massive species needed to grow up.

“Because the T.Rex took up to twenty years to mature, the tyrant king has probably undergone drastic changes as he grew older,” said Dr. Woodward.

“Young people like Jane and Petey were fast, fleet-footed and had knife-like teeth to cut, while adults crushed bones.”

The research by Woodward and her team writes a new chapter in the early years of the world’s most famous dinosaur.

They say it provides evidence that the species took on the crown of “tyrant king” long before it grew up.

WHAT HAS THE DINOSAUR KILLED?

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world’s species were destroyed.

This massive extinction paved the way for the emergence of mammals and the appearance of humans.

The Chicxulub asteroid is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene.

The asteroid struck a shallow sea in what is now the Gulf of Mexico.

The collision released a huge dust and soot cloud that caused global climate change, wiping out 75 percent of all animal and plant species.

Researchers claim that the soot needed for such a global catastrophe could only come from a direct impact on rocks in shallow water around Mexico, which are particularly rich in hydrocarbons.

Experts believe that a huge tsunami tore through the Gulf Coast within 10 hours of the impact.

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world's species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world's species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

About 65 million years ago, non-avian dinosaurs were wiped out and more than half of the world’s species were destroyed. The asteroid Chicxulub is often mentioned as a possible cause of the extinction of the Cretaceous Paleogene (stock image)

This caused earthquakes and landslides in areas as far as Argentina.

But while the waves and outbursts were The creatures that lived then did not just suffer from the waves – the heat was much worse.

During the investigation of the event, researchers found small pieces of rock and other debris that were shot into the air when the asteroid crashed.

These small particles, called spherules, covered the planet with a thick layer of soot.

Experts explain that losing the light from the sun caused a complete collapse of the water system.

This is because the phytoplankton base of almost all aquatic food chains would have been eliminated.

It is believed that the more than 180 million years of evolution that brought the world to Cretaceous was destroyed in less than the lifetime of a Tyrannosaurus rex, which is around 20 to 30 years.

.