Teen Vogue announces the replacement of Alexi McCammond

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Teen Vogue has appointed a new editor-in-chief after Alexi McCammond was impeached last month following an employee response over a series of racist tweets she posted as a teenager.

Danielle Kwateng, a current Teen Vogue employee, was announced on Wednesday as the publication’s new editor-in-chief.

Kwateng, who worked at Teen Vogue for two years, was a culture and entertainment director prior to the promotion, according to her LinkedIn account.

McCammond had stepped down as editor-in-chief of Teen Vogue on March 18 amid a response to her resurfaced racist tweets she posted in 2011. She had only been announced as the editor of Teen Vogue two weeks earlier and had not officially started the role yet.

New editor: Danielle Kwateng

Former Editor: Alexi McCammond

Former Editor: Alexi McCammond

Danielle Kwateng (left), a current Teen Vogue employee, was announced as the publication’s new editor-in-chief on Wednesday after Alexi McCammond (right) was ousted over racist tweets

The 27-year-old was previously a political journalist for Axios and some criticized her appointment for her lack of editorial or executive experience.

Kwateng, a graduate of Columbia University, has worked as an editor at Teen Vogue for the past two years. According to her LinkedIn, she was previously a senior editor at Vice.

Teen Vogue broke its three-week Twitter hiatus to announce the news of Kwateng’s appointment on Wednesday, posting a letter written by the new editor titled, “ What’s Going on Right Now at Teen Vogue. ”

She addressed the controversy surrounding McCammond’s racist tweets, saying that society has the ability to evolve, but “accountability is a critical part of that growth process.”

“We at Teen Vogue have read your comments and emails and we have seen the pain and frustration caused by resurfacing social media posts,” Kwateng said.

While our employees continued to do the groundbreaking and forward-thinking work we are known for, we stopped posting on social media because we turned in and had a lot of difficult discussions about who we are and what comes next.

‘We’re not perfect, but we do know our place in the media landscape and recognize that our readers are the DNA of our work. We invest in you as much as you invest in us. ‘

Despite the interruption of content posted to Teen Vogue’s social media accounts, a number of staffers took to social media at the time to criticize McCammond amid the backlash.

Teen Vogue broke its three-week Twitter hiatus to announce news of Kwateng's appointment on Wednesday and to post a letter written by the new editor titled, 'What's Going on Right Now at Teen Vogue'

Teen Vogue broke its three-week Twitter hiatus to announce news of Kwateng's appointment on Wednesday and to post a letter written by the new editor titled, 'What's Going on Right Now at Teen Vogue'

Teen Vogue broke its three-week Twitter hiatus to announce news of Kwateng’s appointment on Wednesday and to post a letter written by the new editor titled, ‘What’s Going on Right Now at Teen Vogue’

Kwateng, who worked at Teen Vogue for two years, was director of culture and entertainment prior to the promotion.  According to her LinkedIn account, she was in charge of celebrity and cultural content at the time of publication

Kwateng, who worked at Teen Vogue for two years, was director of culture and entertainment prior to the promotion.  According to her LinkedIn account, she was in charge of celebrity and cultural content at the time of publication

Kwateng, who worked at Teen Vogue for two years, was director of culture and entertainment prior to the promotion. According to her LinkedIn account, she was in charge of celebrity and cultural content at the time of publication

More than 20 Teen Vogue employees published an online statement criticizing McCammond’s appointment as editor.

Kwateng had previously said that the 2016 election of President Trump had “ reassessed ” the publication’s stories of those being misunderstood and misrepresented.

“In all of our sections, we’ve reported on topics such as indigenous rights, immigration, Black Lives Matter, sustainability, pop culture, sexuality and more with a fresh outlook that always revolves around young people’s perspectives,” she said.

Kwateng said she was excited about the future of the publication with its “ diverse and brilliant staff of editors and writers. ”

The saga involving McCammond erupted after she was named as the publication’s new editor-in-chief on March 4, and tweets she posted in high school quickly resurfaced.

In the tweets, which were widely shared online, there was one in which she wrote, ‘Googling how not to wake up with puffy Asian eyes’.

Another now-deleted tweet read, ‘Give me a 2/10 on my chemical problem, scrap all my work and don’t explain what I did wrong … thank you so much stupid Asian TA, you’re amazing.’

McCammond also used ‘gay’ and ‘gay’ as insults online and wondered why an article about baseball umpire Dale Scott coming out as gay was ‘newsworthy’.

McCammond later apologized to the Teen Vogue staff in an email.

Tweets McCammond wrote in 2011 - when she was 17 and still in high school - started circulating on Twitter last month

Tweets McCammond wrote in 2011 - when she was 17 and still in high school - started circulating on Twitter last month

Tweets McCammond wrote in 2011 – when she was 17 and still in high school – started circulating on Twitter last month

McCammond issued the above statement announcing her resignation on March 18

McCammond issued the above statement announcing her resignation on March 18

McCammond issued the above statement announcing her resignation on March 18

She had previously apologized for the tweets a few years earlier when she deleted them.

“This has been, in large part, one of the most difficult weeks of my life because of the intense pain that I know my words and my announcement have caused so many of you,” she wrote in her email to staff.

‘I have apologized for my racist and homophobic tweets in the past and will reiterate that there is no excuse to perpetuate those awful stereotypes in any way.’

On March 18 – days before she was due to take on the new role – McCammond officially said goodbye and released a statement that read, “Hey there: I’ve decided to part with Condé Nast.”

My previous tweets have overshadowed the work I’ve done to highlight the people and issues I care about – issues Teen Vogue has worked so tirelessly to share with the world – which is why Conde Nast and I decided to leave to go together.

‘I shouldn’t have tweeted what I did and I took full responsibility for that.

“I look at my work and growth in the years since, and have doubled my commitment to growing in the years to come, both as a person and as a professional,” she said.

McCammond is dating former White House press secretary TJ Ducklo, who resigned from the Biden administration last month after allegedly threatening a reporter who was working on a story about their secret romantic relationship.

McCammond is dating former White House press secretary TJ Ducklo, who resigned from the Biden administration last month after allegedly threatening a reporter.  They were pictured together in Washington DC last week

McCammond is dating former White House press secretary TJ Ducklo, who resigned from the Biden administration last month after allegedly threatening a reporter.  They were pictured together in Washington DC last week

McCammond is dating former White House press secretary TJ Ducklo, who resigned from the Biden administration last month after allegedly threatening a reporter. They were pictured together in Washington DC last week