Teachers at the University of Edinburgh are given a list of ‘microinsults’ they cannot say to transgender people

0

Edinburgh University teachers are given a list of ‘micro-seizures’ they can’t say to trans people, including ‘all women hate their periods’ and ‘I wanted to be a boy when I was a kid’

  • Teachers should not use expressions that are perceived as ‘microinsults and aggressions’
  • Advice says these sentences undermine the trans and non-binary lived experience
  • The staff told them to put preferred pronouns in emails and wear rainbow lanyards on the spot

Teachers at the University of Edinburgh have been given a list of ‘micro-seizures’ including ‘all women hate their periods’ and ‘I wanted to be a boy when I was a kid’ under new transgender-friendly guidance.

Scientists were handed the list of ‘microinsults’ as part of a nationwide campaign to raise awareness of ‘cisgender privilege’ in universities.

It overcomes the fear that these ‘micro-aggressions’ undermine the lived experiences and realities of transgender and nonbinary people.

Teachers at the University of Edinburgh have received a list of ‘micro-seizures’ including ‘all women hate their periods’ and ‘I wanted to be a boy when I was a child’ under new transgender-friendly guidance

The advice goes on to explain that these sentences “deny or nullify the thoughts, feelings, or lived reality of trans and non-binary people, by questioning their experience, gender identity, and the transition process.”

University of Edinburgh staff have also been told not to ‘focus on anatomical sex characteristics, mostly genitals’, asked to put their favorite pronouns in emails and encouraged to wear rainbow cords on the spot to show they are allies of the trans community.

Teachers should avoid using labels such as ‘man’ or ‘woman’ or suggest that someone could be only one or the other, following the guidelines set by the Telegraph.

Other ‘micro-insults’ could include avoiding interacting with trans people because of their gender, or telling them they are ‘just trying to be special’.

The guidelines on the university’s website list a number of other “ micro insults and aggressions to avoid, ” including dead-naming, disagreement, and intrusive questions.

Students told the university that they had experienced invasive interrogations and touches when they revealed they were transgender.

Transgender people and supporters meet in Parliament Square on July 4, 2020 to protest possible changes to the Gender Recognition Act

Transgender people and supporters meet in Parliament Square on July 4, 2020 to protest possible changes to the Gender Recognition Act

The guidelines on the university's website contain a number of other 'micro insults and aggressions to avoid, including deadnaming, disagreement, and intrusive questions

The guidelines on the university’s website contain a number of other ‘micro insults and aggressions to avoid, including deadnaming, disagreement, and intrusive questions

One student, whose name was not mentioned, said, “People feel entitled to ask really intimate questions that they would never ask a cis person.

“Because you’ve been honest about being transgender, they think they’ve been invited to some sort of sexual or personal discussion.”

Similar guidelines have appeared in several Russel Group universities, many of which have asked teachers to take new training on ‘cisgender privilege’ – the benefits afforded to someone who identifies as the gender they were assigned at birth .

Newcastle University has said to its staff: ‘Being cisgender brings social privileges. That’s even for people who are socially disadvantaged in other ways. ‘

Imperial College, LSE, Warwick and Exeter have similarly provided advice on the subject, and scholars have said they use their privilege to be allies of the transgender community.

Staff are asked to step in and “disarm the micro-aggression” if they witness it and to do more to encourage students to “acknowledge their prejudices.”

Advertisement

.