Surprising satellite videos show the dramatic moment when Hurricane Florence makes landfall

NASA's satellite video shows masses of clouds gathering in the eye of the hurricane when it crashed into Wrightsville Beach at 7.15 a.m.

This is the swirling fury of Hurricane Florence when it made landfall in North Carolina on Friday seen from hundreds of kilometers in space.

The satellite videos of NASA and NOAA show masses of clouds that meet in the eye of the hurricane when it crashed into Wrightsville Beach at 7.15am.

The sepulchral stillness of space contrasted with the events on the ground, as the rough waters enveloped the houses and the 90 mph winds uprooted trees from their roots.

NASA's satellite video shows masses of clouds gathering in the eye of the hurricane when it crashed into Wrightsville Beach at 7.15 a.m.

NASA's satellite video shows masses of clouds gathering in the eye of the hurricane when it crashed into Wrightsville Beach at 7.15 a.m.

The NASA images were filmed by cameras outside the International Space Station, which is 254 miles from the surface of the earth.

The video of the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) was taken by a satellite.

Both are being examined by scientists looking to determine the size of the storm and where it might go next.

The hurricane is now on its way inland at only 6 mph per hour, which maximizes the damage it is causing to coastal communities.

"I see a biblically proportioned flood event that is going to occur," Wilmington Police Chief Ralph Evangelous told ABC News.

"I see that the beach communities are flooded with water and destruction that will be beautiful, quite epic in nature."

More than 60 people, including children, had to be removed from a motel in Jacksonville at the height of the storm, and many more who defied evacuation orders expected to be rescued.

The hurricane hit a hole the size of a basketball on the wall of the triangle's engine, causing concrete blocks to collapse and the roof to fall, while residents were still in their rooms.

This other footage was filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and also shows the hurricane hitting Wrightsville Beach

This other footage was filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and also shows the hurricane hitting Wrightsville Beach

This other footage was filmed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and also shows the hurricane hitting Wrightsville Beach

The firefighters had to break through and evacuate the guests to a shelter. No one was hurt.

Rescue teams were also working to free about 150 people trapped in New Bern as city spokeswoman Colleen Roberts warned that the storm surge will increase further as Florence passes over the area.

The nearby Neuse River is more than 10 feet high after exploding its banks on Thursday.

The city warned that people may need to move on to the second story, but told them to stay still because we're going to look for it.

Around 9,700 National Guard and civilian personnel are deployed, with high-speed vehicles, helicopters and ships.

The video is being analyzed by scientists looking to determine the size of the storm and where it might go next.

The video is being analyzed by scientists looking to determine the size of the storm and where it might go next.

The video is being analyzed by scientists looking to determine the size of the storm and where it might go next.

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