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On Wednesday, US District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock sentenced 59-year-old Jeffrey Bizzack to two months in prison, sentencing him as a 12th parent in the USC college admission scandal.

Former Jeffrey Bizzack, executive of the World Surfing League, was sentenced to two months in prison on Wednesday after paying $ 250,000 in bribes to get his son to the University of Southern California, federal prosecutors revealed.

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Bizzack, 59, would have been shamelessly defeated when he watched as 33 parents, including Lori Loughlin, were arrested and accused of crimes he knew he committed in March.

The entrepreneur then quickly turned himself into government and pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit fraud in July.

On Wednesday, US District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock sentenced the 59-year-old to two months in prison, making him the 12th parent convicted in the USC college admission scandal.

As part of the punishment, Bizzack will also be forced to pay a $ 250,000 fine, remain released under supervision for three years at the end of his prison sentence, and perform 300 hours of community service.

On Wednesday, US District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock sentenced 59-year-old Jeffrey Bizzack to two months in prison, sentencing him as a 12th parent in the USC college admission scandal.

On Wednesday, US District Judge Douglas P. Woodlock sentenced 59-year-old Jeffrey Bizzack to two months in prison, sentencing him as a 12th parent in the USC college admission scandal.

Bizzack, 59, would have been shamelessly defeated when he watched as 33 parents, including Lori Loughlin, were arrested and accused of crimes he knew he committed in March.
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Bizzack, 59, was said to have been overcome with shame when he watched as 33 parents, including Lori Loughlin, were arrested and charged with crimes he knew he committed in March

Lori Loughlin

Lori Loughlin

Bizzack is said to have overcome shame when he watched 33 parents, including Lori Loughlin (right), were arrested and charged with crimes he knew he committed in March.

Like the 11 other parents – such as Felicity Huffman – who have since admitted blame, Bizzack has worked with now infamous fixer William Singer, a consultant in Newport Beach who has rigged the SAT and ACT test results for his client's children and has recommended them as top athletes for sports that they didn't play.

Bizzack, who also worked as director of the clothing company Outerknown and the Kelly Slater Wave Co., met singer in April 2017, introduced by a common friend.

As part of Bizzack's bribery, Singer agreed to misrepresent his son at USC as a nationally ranked volleyball star.

In addition to inventing information about his recruitment profile, the image in the document was not even Bizzack's son, but a picture of a real volleyball player. His son was hired at the end of 2017 as a recruited athlete at USC.

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Bizzack intercepted the letter of acceptance so his son didn't know he was being presented as a fake athlete. He then paid $ 50,000 to a bill from former USC athletics officer Donna Heinel and $ 200,000 to a sham lighting organization set up by Singer, according to legal documents.

"Rick, thank you so much for all your help with (my son)! He is enthusiastic about U.S.C. and is still on cloud nine! "Bizzack wrote to Singer in a check.

Prosecutors say that Singer has developed dozens of similar clues with which he could sneak the children of his clients to the USC, UCLA, Georgetown and other elite schools that had gone unnoticed for so long.

Like the 11 other parents - such as Felicity Huffman - who have since admitted blame, Bizzack has worked with now infamous fixer William Singer (above), a consultant in Newport Beach who has rigged the SAT and ACT test results for the children of are clients and advertised as top athletes for sports they didn't play.

Like the 11 other parents - such as Felicity Huffman - who have since admitted blame, Bizzack has worked with now infamous fixer William Singer (above), a consultant in Newport Beach who has rigged the SAT and ACT test results for the children of are clients and advertised as top athletes for sports they didn't play.

Like the 11 other parents – such as Felicity Huffman – who have since admitted blame, Bizzack has worked with now infamous fixer William Singer (above), a consultant in Newport Beach who has rigged the SAT and ACT test results for the children of are clients and advertised as top athletes for sports they didn't play.

Bizzack intercepted the letter of acceptance so his son didn't know he was being presented as a fake athlete. He then paid $ 50,000 to a bill from former USC athletics officer Donna Heinel and $ 200,000 to a sham lighting organization set up by Singer, showing legal documents
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Bizzack intercepted the letter of acceptance so his son didn't know he was being presented as a fake athlete. He then paid $ 50,000 to a bill from former USC athletics officer Donna Heinel and $ 200,000 to a sham lighting organization set up by Singer, showing legal documents

Bizzack intercepted the letter of acceptance so his son didn't know he was being presented as a fake athlete. He then paid $ 50,000 to a bill from former USC athletics officer Donna Heinel and $ 200,000 to a sham lighting organization set up by Singer, showing legal documents

However, what makes Bizzack & # 39; s case unique is that he was the only one who surrendered to the scandal. His lawyer said in a sentencing memorandum that he decided to contact federal prosecutors because he was so overcome by shame.

From that moment on, he was engaged in truthful, complete and frank discussions about his actions, his counsel said.

It remains unclear whether Bizzack knew that he had been under investigation for months or not. At the request of the FBI, Singer had called Bizzack in October 2018 and tried to elicit a recorded confession from him.

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Bizzack also met with USC researchers on their own initiative to support their research. For a number of hours, he spoke openly and honestly about everything he knew about the schedule and his participation in it & # 39 ;, documents obtained by the LA Times show.

His lawyers said that given Bizzack & # 39; s "extraordinary responsibility assumption", he should be spared the prison and punished instead with a probationary period, a $ 75,000 fine and a community service.

From the other bank, prosecutors argued that he should be given a nine-month prison sentence because his crime eroded public confidence and caused concrete damage: the theft of a recording spot and the associated lifelong chances of a more deserving student. & # 39;

Singer has since been found guilty of various conspiracies and has worked with prosecutors. Heinel, who was fired by USC in March, did not commit to racketeering and was charged last week for additional conspiracy and fraud.

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