Skripal niece says that claims that Russia is behind the novichok attack could be a HOAX

Sergei Skripal's niece, Viktoria, said claims that Russia was behind the novichok attack on the double agent could be a hoax, and questioned whether he is still alive. Viktoria Spripal appears at a press conference in Russia today

Sergei Skripal's niece said claims that Russia was behind the novichok attack on the double agent could be a hoax, and said he doubts he is still alive.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, questioned why it had taken six months for Britain to reveal the details of the men accused of trying to murder their uncle Sergei and his cousin Yulia in Salisbury.

He also said he doubts the former Russian spy is still alive because he has not communicated with the family since the poisoning in March.

His comments, in a newspaper interview, came before he appeared at a choreographed Russian press conference during which he said he did not know the men accused of carrying out the attack and asked why he was denied entry. to Great Britain.

Sergei Skripal's niece, Viktoria, said claims that Russia was behind the novichok attack on the double agent could be a hoax, and questioned whether he is still alive. Viktoria Spripal appears at a press conference in Russia today

Sergei Skripal's niece, Viktoria, said claims that Russia was behind the novichok attack on the double agent could be a hoax, and questioned whether he is still alive. Viktoria Spripal appears at a press conference in Russia today

Heresa May told parliament that the CPS was ready to accuse two Russian citizens: Alexander Petrov (right) and Ruslan Boshirov (left), with an assassination attempt on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

Heresa May told parliament that the CPS was ready to accuse two Russian citizens: Alexander Petrov (right) and Ruslan Boshirov (left), with an assassination attempt on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

Heresa May told parliament that the CPS was ready to accuse two Russian citizens: Alexander Petrov (right) and Ruslan Boshirov (left), with an assassination attempt on Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

Skripal and her daughter Yulia were hospitalized for weeks in critical condition after they were exposed to a novichok in the city of Salisbury on March 4. Now they are recovering in a secret place for their own protection.

Skripal and her daughter Yulia were hospitalized for weeks in critical condition after they were exposed to a novichok in the city of Salisbury on March 4. Now they are recovering in a secret place for their own protection.

Skripal and her daughter Yulia were hospitalized for weeks in critical condition after they were exposed to a novichok in the city of Salisbury on March 4. Now they are recovering in a secret place for their own protection.

"I think if Sergei Skripal were alive there would be no obstacles for me to go see him," he said.

Are you thinking that I am also a terrorist and that I am going to get there with this novichok and I will try to poison them again? Why do not they let me in?

In a previous interview with a Russian newspaper, he said: "Exactly six months have passed since the poisoning on September 4. I have only one question: if the British knew this so well, why did not they announce it before?"

Viktoria asked British authorities to allow him to visit his family in Britain after his visa application was rejected.

She spoke after Theresa May told parliament that the CPS was ready to accuse two Russian citizens, Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, for an attempted assassination of Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia.

She claimed that both were officers of the GRU (Main Intelligence Directorate) and that the operation had been "approved at a higher level of the Russian state."

Scotland Yard has published its photographs, but in an interview in a newspaper, Viktoria Skripal tried to affirm that the images could have been retouched, informs Tass.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, questioned why Britain had taken six months to publish the details of the men accused of trying to kill their uncle Sergei and his cousin Yulia in Salisbury.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, questioned why Britain had taken six months to publish the details of the men accused of trying to kill their uncle Sergei and his cousin Yulia in Salisbury.

Viktoria Skripal, 45, questioned why Britain had taken six months to publish the details of the men accused of trying to kill their uncle Sergei and his cousin Yulia in Salisbury.

The assassination attempt was approved & # 39; at a higher level of the Russian state & # 39 ;, said Theresa May (pictured) on Wednesday

The assassination attempt was approved & # 39; at a higher level of the Russian state & # 39 ;, said Theresa May (pictured) on Wednesday

The assassination attempt was approved & # 39; at a higher level of the Russian state & # 39 ;, said Theresa May (pictured) on Wednesday

Describing herself as a "little Russian citizen," Skripal questioned why she had not been allowed to enter Britain to visit her family.

The Kremlin on Thursday rejected accusations by British officials that Putin was responsible for poisoning Sergei Skripal and said Russia would not investigate the suspects.

The British security minister, Ben Wallace, called Putin for the attack of nervous agents directed against Skripal and his daughter and also warned that the United Kingdom would counteract the Russian "malignant activity" with both public and covert measures.

Wallace told the BBC that Putin and his government "control, finance and direct" the military intelligence unit known as GRU, which Britain believes used the nerichok agent developed by the Soviets to try to kill the former Russian spy Skripal.

Skripal and her daughter Yulia were hospitalized for weeks in critical condition after they were exposed to a novichok in the city of Salisbury on March 4. Now they are recovering in a secret place for their own protection.

Local woman Dawn Sturgess died and her boyfriend Charlie Rowley became ill after they found traces of the poison in a perfume bottle discarded in June.

The two spies were photographed in Salisbury the day before the attack, when they undertook a reconnaissance trip.

The two spies were photographed in Salisbury the day before the attack, when they undertook a reconnaissance trip.

The two spies were photographed in Salisbury the day before the attack, when they undertook a reconnaissance trip.

Britain on Wednesday announced charges in absentia against two alleged Russian agents, Alexander Petrov and Ruslan Boshirov, names that are probably aliases. The assassination attempt was approved "at a higher level of the Russian state," Theresa May said Wednesday.

Moscow vigorously denies its participation in the attack, and Russian authorities said they did not recognize the suspects.

Speaking to reporters on Thursday, Putin's spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, called the accusations against Putin and the Russian government "unacceptable".

"Neither the Russian leadership nor its representatives have anything to do with the events in Salisbury," he said.

Peskov also said that Russia "has no reason" to investigate the two indictees on Wednesday because Britain did not request legal assistance in the case.

Britain has said it will not seek the extradition of men because Russian law does not allow the extradition of its nationals to be tried abroad.

Russian officials have vehemently denied the new allegations. The spokeswoman of the Ministry of Outer Subjects, Maria Zakharova, left to the national television alleging that the images of the camera of security of the two suspects that arrived at the airport from Gatwick thrown by the British authorities have been adulterated because it shows them at the same time in the same place. A closer look, however, shows that the men were walking in different corridors at the door.

Zakharova accused Britain on Thursday of "hiding the evidence" and demanded that Britain share the suspects' fingerprints and other data.

The poisoning of Skripals ignited a diplomatic confrontation in which hundreds of envoys were expelled by Russia and Western nations. But there is a limited appetite among Britain's European allies for new sanctions against Moscow.

Britain plans to press its case against Russia at the UN Security Council later on Thursday.

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