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Smokers are paid to quit as part of a controversial process underway in Tasmania

Should smokers be PAID to quit cold turkey? Controversial study finds that nicotine addicts receive financial incentives to remove cigarettes – with very surprising results

  • A university study is being conducted in Tasmania to pay people to quit smoking
  • Previous study by the university team is back by the state government
  • Participants are required to attend weekly meetings that monitor smoking rates
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Smokers are paid to quit as part of a controversial process underway in Tasmania.

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The college run is currently being rolled out in Georgetown, about 50 km north of Launceston – a community with one of the highest smoking rates in the country.

Those who sign up as part of the process are required to attend weekly meetings and breathe in a carbon monoxide detector.

Those who keep their word about not lighting will receive a $ 50 voucher per week to be used at local businesses.

Smokers are paid to quit as part of a controversial process underway in Tasmania

Smokers are paid to quit as part of a controversial process underway in Tasmania

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Principal investigator of the research, Dr. Mai Frandsen, University of Tasmania, said that monetary incentives had proven results in the field of smoking.

& # 39; Giving incentives is tackling the problem, rather than waiting to intervene later in the health effects, often when it is too late & # 39 ;, said Dr. Frandsen.

The research is conducted with the help of local pharmacists, of whom Dr. Frandsen says it helps the participants further.

& # 39; The community base also provides the setting for a & # 39; social contract & # 39; between participants and the companies involved, & # 39; she said.

The & # 39; Tobacco Free Communities program & # 39; which includes this study also included previous tests.

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Dr. Frandsen said an earlier trial of financial incentives that pregnant women had as participants found that 27 percent stopped – which is about 3-4 times more effective than without incentives.

After six months, around 16 percent remained smoke-free – well above the usual seven percent.

Those who keep their word about not lighting will receive a $ 50 voucher per week to be used at local businesses

Those who keep their word about not lighting will receive a $ 50 voucher per week to be used at local businesses

Those who keep their word about not lighting will receive a $ 50 voucher per week to be used at local businesses

Dr. Sarah White from Quit Victoria told ABC radio Smoking rates are lower than ever.

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She said that only about 12 percent of Australians smoke and only about two percent of high school students recently smoke.

She attributes the reduced rates for smoking to taxes that make the price of cigarettes more expensive, legislation that prohibits public smoking, and campaigns against smoking.

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