Shock research reveals the mistake we're all making, and could leave you with skin cancer

In the world's first discoveries, researchers discovered that Australians should make sunscreen a daily necessity and not just an application necessary only for trips to the beach (stock image)

Surprising new research has found that Australians are more at risk of skin cancer than previously thought.

In the first discoveries of the world, researchers discovered that Australians should make sunscreen a daily necessity and not just an application necessary only for trips to the beach.

The research discovered that the aussies of frighteningly high ultraviolet output are being exposed to every day and how fast it takes to cause serious damage not only to their skin, but to their DNA.

In the world's first discoveries, researchers discovered that Australians should make sunscreen a daily necessity and not just an application necessary only for trips to the beach (stock image)

In the world's first discoveries, researchers discovered that Australians should make sunscreen a daily necessity and not just an application necessary only for trips to the beach (stock image)

Cities like Melbourne experienced a shortage of casualties two days a year where there was not enough ultraviolet light to burn from the sun (stock image)

Cities like Melbourne experienced a shortage of casualties two days a year where there was not enough ultraviolet light to burn from the sun (stock image)

Cities like Melbourne experienced a shortage of casualties two days a year where there was not enough ultraviolet light to burn from the sun (stock image)

The research, conducted by the National University of Australia and the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research of New Zealand, aimed to diminish the somewhat antiquated recommendations of health agencies for sun protection, and that is what it did.

At this time, we are told to protect our skin when the UV index reaches three or more.

The index is calculated by international health agencies that measure the maximum intensity of solar radiation, which is generally at its highest point since 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.

But the results, which measured the average total UV production throughout the day and even surprised the researchers.

Speaking to The Canberra Times, Robyn Lucas of ANU said she was surprised by the results, saying that although they had already gone to the World Health Organization on the subject, she never had the numbers in front of her.

UV measurements were carried out in the two dramatically different climates of the South Island of New Zealand and Melbourne.

"Most people think that if it's cold and covered, they're fine, but their face and hands are still exposed and those are the most common places for skin cancer" (stock image)

The team discovered that cities like Melbourne experienced a shortage of casualties two days a year where there was not enough ultraviolet light to burn the sun.

And the farther north they went, the numbers became more fearsome.

"I suspect there would not be days in Canberra [and most of Australia] where you can not burn the sun, "said Professor Lucas.

The findings not only concluded the almost zero days of "safe" exposure to UV rays, but also the short time people had to protect their skin.

Professor Lucas said that people with normal and fair European skin that were classified as "type two" would take about 45 minutes to an hour to burn and even less to damage their DNA.

"Usually, that kind of damage repairs before you burn, but the more time you spend outside, and the older you are, the less you can trust that," he said.

For people with extremely clear skin, such as redheads, the window became much shorter, taking only 30 minutes to burn the sun, and that is in the middle of winter.

"Most people think that if it's cold and covered, they're fine, but their face and hands are still exposed and those are the most common places for skin cancer." Professor Lucas warned.

The data collected will surely surprise not only Australians but also health agencies that have long been complacent about the "slip, shedding, slap" message that is released every summer.

The researchers want Australians to know that it is important to understand that this very specific warning message for summer is no longer the case.

"Even if the UV index is low, if you're out for more than 10 or 15 minutes … you're at risk."

  SLIP, SLOP, SLAP ALWAYS: & # 39; Even if the UV index is low, if it's outside for more than 10 or 15 minutes ... it's at risk & # 39; (stock image)

  SLIP, SLOP, SLAP ALWAYS: & # 39; Even if the UV index is low, if it's outside for more than 10 or 15 minutes ... it's at risk & # 39; (stock image)

SLIP, SLOP, SLAP ALWAYS: & # 39; Even if the UV index is low, if it's outside for more than 10 or 15 minutes … it's at risk & # 39; (stock image)

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