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Russia ‘moves military equipment towards Finnish border after warning Finland not to join NATO’ 

Russian heavy weapons, including missile systems, are on their way to the border with Finland hours after Russia warned its northern neighbor against joining NATO.

An unconfirmed video uploaded last night appears to show two Russian coastal defense missile systems moving along a road on the Russian side of the border leading to Helsinki.

The missile systems would be the K-300P Bastion-P Mobile Coastal Defense System, designed to take out surface ships up to and including carrier battlegroups.

The Russian commitment comes as Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin said she expects her government to “end the discussion before midsummer” on whether or not to apply for NATO membership.

Recent polls by a Finnish market research firm show that 84% of Finns view Russia as a ‘significant military threat’, up 25% from last year.

In response, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov euphemistically warned that the move would “not improve the security situation in Europe,” and Moscow lawmaker Vladimir Dzhabarov added more bluntly that it would mean “the destruction of the country.”

“We have repeatedly said that the alliance remains an instrument aimed at confrontation and that its further expansion will not bring stability to the European continent,” Peskov said.

An unconfirmed video uploaded last night appears to show two Russian coastal defense missile systems moving along a road on the Russian side of the border leading to Helsinki.

An unconfirmed video uploaded last night appears to show two Russian coastal defense missile systems moving along a road on the Russian side of the border leading to Helsinki.

The Russian commitment comes as Finland and Sweden debate the benefits of joining NATO's military alliance in light of Russia's invasion of Ukraine

The Russian commitment comes as Finland and Sweden debate the benefits of joining NATO’s military alliance in light of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine

The video clearly shows road signs leading to the Finnish capital Helsinki.  Finland, currently neutral, shares an 830-mile border with Russia

The video clearly shows road signs leading to the Finnish capital Helsinki. Finland, currently neutral, shares an 830-mile border with Russia

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov (pictured left, with Putin) told reporters yesterday that Sweden and Finland's possible accession to NATO's military alliance would not improve the situation in Europe.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov (pictured left, with Putin) told reporters yesterday that Sweden and Finland’s possible accession to NATO’s military alliance would not improve the situation in Europe.

Yesterday, NATO announced that two multinational naval groups of 16 ships led by the Royal Navy will patrol the Baltic coasts of countries such as Poland and Estonia to “maintain a credible and capable defensive capability.”

Finland, along with neighboring Sweden, has historically avoided NATO membership, despite its close ties to the West, in an effort not to provoke Russia.

But the Scandinavian country shares an 830-mile border with Russia and has been disheartened by Putin’s invasion of Ukraine after being invaded by the Soviet Union once before in 1939.

Meanwhile, Sweden’s ruling party began formally debating the possibility of making a membership offer yesterday, a move that would signal a complete reversal of its policy role for the Scandinavian kingdom that has remained militarily neutral for decades. .

Party Secretary Tobias Baudin told local media that the NATO Review should be completed within months.

“When Russia invaded Ukraine, Sweden’s security position fundamentally changed,” the party said in a statement.

An up-to-date map of NATO membership in Europe.  Sweden and Finland have historically avoided membership so as not to provoke Russia, but the Russian invasion of Ukraine has changed their calculus

An up-to-date map of NATO membership in Europe. Sweden and Finland have historically avoided membership so as not to provoke Russia, but the Russian invasion of Ukraine has changed their calculus

Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin (above) indicated that Finland would decide before midsummer whether to apply for NATO membership, angering the Kremlin, which said the move

Finnish Prime Minister Sanna Marin (above) indicated that Finland would decide before midsummer whether to apply for NATO membership, angering the Kremlin, which said the move “would not improve the security situation in Europe”

In Sweden, the ruling center-left Social Democrats have traditionally opposed NATO membership, but the more than six-week conflict in Ukraine has reignited debate in the Scandinavian kingdom.  The party, led by Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson (pictured right along with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen), is said to have started discussing the possibility of joining NATO today.

In Sweden, the ruling center-left Social Democrats have traditionally opposed NATO membership, but the more than six-week conflict in Ukraine has reignited debate in the Scandinavian kingdom. The party, led by Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson (pictured right along with European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen), is said to have started discussing the possibility of joining NATO today.

In Sweden, the ruling center-left Social Democrats have traditionally opposed NATO membership, but the more than six-week conflict in Ukraine has reignited debate in the Scandinavian kingdom.

A policy reversal for the party, which ruled uninterrupted forty years between the 1930s and 1970s, would be historic and could pave the way for Sweden to apply to join NATO.

The party, led by Swedish Prime Minister Magdalena Andersson, is said to have started discussing the possibility of joining NATO today, and the issue is expected to take center stage in parliamentary elections set for September 11. planned.

Sweden is officially a non-aligned military, although it is a NATO partner and gave up its position of strict neutrality after the end of the Cold War.

After initially stressing that non-alignment had “served Sweden’s interests well,” Andersson recently admitted she was ready to discuss the policy and in late March said she would “not reject a bid to join NATO.” Close’.

Mr Peskov made it clear that Russia ‘would have to rebalance the situation’ with its own measures if Sweden and Finland were to join NATO.

The spiral of escalation has seen both countries increase their defense spending, with Helsinki announcing plans to spend £11 on drones and Stockholm adding another £243 million to their military budget.

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