Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Robin and Blackbird numbers plummeted in 2019, but boobs thrived

The numbers of robins and blackbirds in the United Kingdom plummeted in 2019, as the hot summer dried up the earth and made it difficult for birds to find insects and worms to eat.

In contrast, species such as tits, which eat insects that live in trees, thrived, revealed data collected by British Trust volunteers for Ornithology.

The results also revealed that 2019 had an early breeding season, possibly thanks to the record temperatures of February.

In warmer springs, it is known that birds lay their eggs earlier so that their young are born when the insects they feed are more abundant.

Scroll down to watch the video

The numbers of robins and blackbirds in the United Kingdom plummeted in 2019, as the hot summer dried up the earth and made it difficult for birds to find insects and worms to eat. In contrast, species that eat insects that live in trees, such as tits, one of which is shown, thrived

The numbers of robins and blackbirds in the United Kingdom plummeted in 2019, as the hot summer dried up the earth and made it difficult for birds to find insects and worms to eat. In contrast, species that eat insects that live in trees, such as tits, one of which is shown, thrived

WHAT IS THE BIRD RING?

In the photo, a bird is ringed

In the photo, a bird is ringed

In the photo, a bird is ringed

Bird buzzing is a method that identifies individual birds.

It involves fixing a metal ring – or band – at the foot of a bird.

This tag usually carries an identification number and an address of the bell of the bird that attached it.

Each band is designed to be light and have no negative effect on birds.

As the birds are repeatedly recaptured, the rings can help track bird stories, migrations, population numbers, etc.

The British Trust for Ornithology has been touching birds since 1983.

In the photo, near a tag on the leg of a bird

In the photo, near a tag on the leg of a bird

In the photo, near a tag on the leg of a bird

Last year’s most successful birds appear to have been chickens, with a number of large, long-tailed blue, large hens that begin and end the breeding season strongly.

The good start of the year followed an excellent breeding season in 2018, and it was noted that many of the tits found by birdwatchers last year were juveniles that nested for the first time.

Volunteers who monitored the nests also discovered that each breeding pair also produced a higher than average number of chicks, a finding that could announce an equally successful 2020 for the tits.

Much can depend on the weather this winter, although it has been relatively mild to date, recent wet conditions can be challenging, especially for younger and less experienced birds.

In contrast, several common bird species seen in British gardens endured a particularly challenging 2019.

The number of blackbirds and dunnocks has been reduced to their lowest level since the doorbell’s trust practice began in 1983.

It was also discovered that robins were less abundant in 2019, falling by around 15 percent compared to the previous year, while finch and green numbers dropped by approximately 40 percent in 2018 figures.

According to British Trust for Ornithology experts, these minimums are probably the result of a less successful breeding season last year than their tit cousins.

According to the trust, the proportion of blackbirds, dunnocks and robins that survived the winter was not unusual.

As for non-resident migratory species that only spend part of the year in the United Kingdom, the researchers discovered that chiffchaffs and blackcaps, warblers that spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa, came back into force in 2019.

Blackcaps, in particular, had a good year, with its highest numbers ever recorded.

Unfortunately, long-distance migrants, who spend their winters farther south of Africa, were less abundant, and the number of medium-sized sedge warblers was particularly low, reaching only two-thirds of those in the early 1980s.

The number of blackbirds (one in the photo) and dunnocks counted dropped to their lowest level since the British Trust for Ornithology sonar practice began in 1983

The number of blackbirds (one in the photo) and dunnocks counted dropped to their lowest level since the British Trust for Ornithology sonar practice began in 1983

The number of blackbirds (one in the photo) and dunnocks counted dropped to their lowest level since the British Trust for Ornithology sonar practice began in 1983

It was also discovered that robins (one in the photo) were less abundant in 2019. According to experts from the British Trust for Ornithology, the decline is likely to be the result of a less successful breeding season in 2018

It was also discovered that robins (one in the photo) were less abundant in 2019. According to experts from the British Trust for Ornithology, the decline is likely to be the result of a less successful breeding season in 2018

It was also discovered that robins (one in the photo) were less abundant in 2019. According to experts from the British Trust for Ornithology, the decline is likely to be the result of a less successful breeding season in 2018

“These results demonstrate the impact that weather conditions can have on the number and reproductive success of birds,” said Lee Barber, organizer of the British Demo for Ornithology Demographic Surveys.

“The fact that our volunteers have provided directly equivalent figures over the past 40 years allows us to study in great detail the effects of our changing climate on bird populations.”

“With this information, we can begin to predict what will happen in the future and how we could influence it, providing a more positive outcome.”

Looking at non-resident migratory species that only spend part of the year in the United Kingdom, researchers discovered that chiffchaffs and blackcaps, warblers that spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa, came back into force in 2019 Blackcaps (one of which is shown in the image) He had a particularly good year, with his highest numbers ever recorded.

Looking at non-resident migratory species that only spend part of the year in the United Kingdom, researchers discovered that chiffchaffs and blackcaps, warblers that spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa, came back into force in 2019 Blackcaps (one of which is shown in the image) He had a particularly good year, with his highest numbers ever recorded.

Looking at non-resident migratory species that only spend part of the year in the United Kingdom, researchers discovered that chiffchaffs and blackcaps, warblers that spend the winter in southern Europe and northern Africa, came back into force in 2019 Blackcaps (one of which is shown in the image) He had a particularly good year, with his highest numbers ever recorded.

Volunteers’ work is vital to the British Trust for Ornithology research, Barber emphasized.

“Our volunteer bells and nest registrars contribute thousands of hours each year to collect this invaluable data,” he added.

“The best thing is that everyone, from the novice to the experienced birdwatcher, can help contribute by participating in British Trust for Ornithology surveys.”

The full results of the report were published in the British Trust for Ornithology website.

.