Renowned neurosurgeon Charlie Teo appears in a video for Pete Evans’ anti-vax website

High-profile neurosurgeon Charlie Teo has appeared in a video featuring controversial conspiracy theorist and anti-vaxxer Pete Evans — amid explosive accusations that the hotshot doctor operated on the wrong side of a patient’s brain.

The Australian brain tumor expert spoke to the disgraced chef and My Kitchen Rules jury about the potential benefits of medical marijuana in a newly released video from a podcast originally recorded in 2019 for his Evolve Network website.

dr. Teo was criticized by a prominent medical expert for giving Evans legitimacy by appearing on his website even when he disagreed with his views.

Associate professor Ken Hughes, president of Friends of Science in Medicine – an organization that opposes non-evidence-based alternative medicine – said it was “unfortunate” that Dr. Teo allied himself with Evans.

“It was unfortunate to see Charlie Teo associated with Pete Evans, who is notorious for his views on alternative medicine,” he told the Daily Mail Australia.

“The last thing Pete Evans needs is confirmation from a neurosurgeon, especially from such a prominent one.”

Disgraced former My Kitchen Rules judge Pete Evans has pushed dangerous conspiracy theories about coronavirus, such as denying it’s real and opposing the vaccine

Evans largely rejects modern medicine – such as life-saving vaccines – and has been slapped with fines of more than $80,000 for trying to profit from fraudulent Covid-19 treatments online.

dr. Teo, 62, on the other hand, uses scientific research and modern medicines to save the lives of cancer patients who would die without his help.

But the video surfaced as Dr. Teo faces a ban from practicing as the NSW Medical Council convenes an ‘immediate action panel’ and restricts him from performing certain procedures.

Despite their conflicting views, the couple enjoyed a 47-minute chat on topics ranging from the 5G network and whether cell phones cause cancer, to jokes about politicians smoking marijuana before debating in parliament.

Evans believes the absurd theory that 5G towers somehow played a role in the spread of Covid-19 and then were banned from social media for spreading false health advice among impressionable Australians.

Conspiracy theorist Pete Evans at a protest against Covid vaccines in Sydney

Conspiracy theorist Pete Evans at a protest against Covid vaccines in Sydney

dr.  Charlie Teo during an interview with Pete Evans in 2019, with the video of the podcast only recently released

dr. Charlie Teo during an interview with Pete Evans in 2019, with the video of the podcast only recently released

When he was Dr. Teo tried to ask about 5G towers, the surgeon strategically steered the conversation toward scientific evidence.

‘5G – do you have any ideas on that topic?’ asked Evans.

“No, I’m not an expert on 5G, 4G or the physics of electromagnetic radiation — I’m an expert on brain cancer and that’s it,” said Dr Teo.

The doctor explained that old-fashioned “brick” models of cell phones from the early 1990s emitted large amounts of cancer-causing electromagnetic radiation, but modern phones do not emit nearly as much and are perfectly safe.

Fortunately, the trend continues today [phones] away from your head, texting — plus the energy emitted by these phones is significantly less than the ancient bricks,” he said.

Charlie Teo with his daughter Nicola.  dr.  Teo offers life-saving surgery to people with brain tumors

Charlie Teo with his daughter Nicola. dr. Teo offers life-saving surgery to people with brain tumors

Pete Evans with Nicola Robinson.  Evans is an anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist

Pete Evans with Nicola Robinson. Evans is an anti-vaxxer and conspiracy theorist

When Evans Dr. When Teo asked about his research on medical marijuana, he gave an example of his only experience with the substance: at a house party in Glebe, in the inner west of Sydney, when he was a young man.

“There was a very pretty girl there who smoked drugs and I think I wanted to impress her, so I sat down next to her and said, ‘Do you want a joint?’ he recalls.

When Dr. Teo refused, asking the girl if he had taken drugs – to which he lied and said yes, so he agreed to eat a hash biscuit.

“This is someone whose body is unbelievably pure – I’ve never taken any medicine, I’ve eaten this hash biscuit and I was off my face,” he said.

“I had my bike with me, and I got on the bike to ride home and the road was everywhere and I was disoriented, so I had to leave the bike there and walk home.”

He went on to explain that he was conducting clinical trials on the use of medicinal marijuana and cannabidiol (CBD) oil to see if it could shrink brain tumors — and entered the study with “an open mind.”

Charlie Teo relived the moment he used drugs for the first time.  He hasn't touched drugs or alcohol since then

Charlie Teo relived the moment he used drugs for the first time. He hasn’t touched drugs or alcohol since then

“I knew nothing about it,” he said.

“I’ve never smoked, drank alcohol, my body is a temple and I treat it with great respect, so it’s not like I have a background in cannabis.”

The medical trial was announced in 2018 and has not yet been completed.

Evans and the surgeon joked about sprinkling CBD oil on his colleagues’ breakfasts who scolded him for conducting the studies.

“Maybe cannabis is their gateway to look at life differently,” Evans said.

“A few drops in their breakfast,” Dr Teo joked.

‘So [marijuana] could be a magical plant after all,’ Evans continued. “I get this picture of parliament hanging out and they all have to smoke a cigarette before going in.”

Doctor Teo couldn’t contain his laugh at first, before his tone changed and he said, ‘Oh my god, oh my god, can you imagine? It could really change the whole face of the planet. I like it.’

Daily Mail Australia contacted Charlie Teo for comment.

Pete Evans at a march against mandatory Covid-19 vaccines in February this year

Pete Evans at a march against mandatory Covid-19 vaccines in February this year

On Saturday, Dr. Teo accused of operating on the wrong side of the brain of Sydney woman Michelle Smith, who was 19 in 2003 when she went to see the high-profile surgeon to have a tumor removed.

According to a report from the Sydney Morning Herald, specialists reviewing the MRI scans 12 years later accused Dr. Teo from removing healthy brain tissue from the wrong side of her brain.

But the famed surgeon on Sunday hit back at the “blemish” of his professional reputation, saying he “has never operated on the wrong side of the brain in my entire career.”

“I didn’t get a chance to reply to these comments,” he told the… Sunday Telegraph.

“If I’d had the chance to answer the allegations, I would have welcomed the opportunity.”

dr. Teo explained that the surgical technique used in Ms Smith’s surgery required that the tumor be approached from a “difficult location” to reduce the risk of the procedure.

He also said that Ms. Smith knew the tumor was not completely removed during the surgery, but Dr. Teo said he was not aware her seizures had returned until she filed a lawsuit against him in 2019.

The case was settled out of court.

dr.  Charlie Teo and his model girlfriend and former patient Traci Griffiths, 46, attended the Rebel Ball Reimagined at Doltone House in Sydney on May 2.

dr. Charlie Teo and his model girlfriend and former patient Traci Griffiths, 46, attended the Rebel Ball Reimagined at Doltone House in Sydney on May 2.

The NSW Medical Board has instructed Dr Teo to prove that he explained the financial costs and risks to patients prior to surgery.

He may also only perform certain operations after written permission from a fellow neurosurgeon.

The restrictions follow the NSW medical board calling on Dr Teo last week to attend an ‘immediate action panel’.

The neurosurgeon accepted the directions and said he always consulted a colleague, often from a leading medical school.

Aside from Council guidelines, he will retroactively evaluate the results of operations with a colleague.

Evans has been involved in a litany of controversies that have left him with fines and bans from social media platforms.

In addition to being fined for selling fraudulent Covid-19 treatments online, he had also been fined $25,000 for trying to sell his so-called BioCharger on Facebook for $15,000 a pop.

He insisted the device could cure Covid-19 and protect users from infection, but had no evidence to support those claims.

Despite the initial fine, the whimsical-faced conspiracy theorist continued to try to sell the light to the unwary, along with a range of other fake treatments.

dr.  Teo cites his 'great personality' and the fact that he trained in the US as the reasons his colleagues were quick to fire him

dr. Teo cites his ‘great personality’ and the fact that he trained in the US as the reasons his colleagues were quick to fire him

In May, he was fined another $79,920 for advertising the BioCharger and several other unapproved and totally ineffective treatments

He also advertised two oral medications, static magnet products and hyperbaric chambers for breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized environment.

Evans falsely suggested that the products were approved by health professionals, but he has now been ordered to remove the posts and stop all ads for them.

The former reality TV star has also been permanently booted from Facebook and Instagram for sharing misinformation and conspiracy theories.

He has repeatedly posted against Covid-19 vaccines and masks, falsely claiming in a podcast that the coronavirus is a hoax.

Evans was a judge on My Kitchen Rules from 2010 to 2020 and had more than a million Facebook followers until his forced departure.

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