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Prison guards reveal how Australian criminals use the corona virus to shorten prison terms

Prison Guards Reveal How Criminals Use the Coronavirus Crisis in Desperate Attempts to Reduce Prison

  • Criminals claim they should be saved from jail time to avoid getting the corona virus
  • The prison guard says “they will come there and say everything” when they are in court
  • Some nonviolent, vulnerable prisoners are allowed to leave prison early

Australian criminals use the coronavirus pandemic to receive special treatment or to shorten their sentences, it is claimed.

According to a prison guard working in New South Wales, inmates say ‘say everything’ in court and have used the threat of infection as an excuse to receive a milder sentence

On Monday, a defendant who charges a litany of robberies and escaping detention against a district court told him to be transferred from prison to a “much cleaner” rehab clinic to avoid the coronavirus.

The man’s lawyer alleged that prisoners at the Parklea Correctional Center in Sydney have no access to antibacterial products and have resorted to cleaning their own cells with shampoo, the Daily telegram reported.

Prisoners imagined walking through the gardens at the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Center in Silverwater, Sydney

Prisoners imagined walking through the gardens at the Metropolitan Remand and Reception Center in Silverwater, Sydney

Australian criminals are using the corona virus pandemic to receive special treatment and shorten their prison sentences, police have revealed

Australian criminals are using the corona virus pandemic to receive special treatment and shorten their prison sentences, police have revealed

Australian criminals are using the corona virus pandemic to receive special treatment and shorten their prison sentences, police have revealed

But Corrective Services New South Wales claimed they are taking strict measures to protect prisoners from the virus, including a “significant increase in clean-up.”

All staff and detainees are screened upon entering a prison or other corrective agency in New South Wales to identify people with possible symptoms of COVID-19 or who have been abroad or have contacted a confirmed person in the past 14 days matter, “the spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia.

“We work closely with Justice Health to monitor detainees who are at increased risk of infection, including those with a history of respiratory disease.

“All prisoners who show possible symptoms of the virus are isolated, fitted with a surgical mask and tested immediately.”

The Shortland Correctional Center in Cessnock (above) is a maximum security prison in the New South Wales Hunter Valley where two fires broke out on Friday

The Shortland Correctional Center in Cessnock (above) is a maximum security prison in the New South Wales Hunter Valley where two fires broke out on Friday

The Shortland Correctional Center in Cessnock (above) is a maximum security prison in the New South Wales Hunter Valley where two fires broke out on Friday

The New South Wales government has recently passed emergency laws that, under certain circumstances, will allow nonviolent, vulnerable prisoners to be released early.

One of the more drastic measures introduced by correctional institutions across Australia has been the suspension of all personal prison visits.

Tensions mounted on Friday as two fires broke out at Cessnock’s Shortland Correctional Center – a maximum security prison in the Hunter Valley in New South Wales.

But Corrective Services Commissioner Peter Severin downplayed the turmoil and link to prisoner stress about the corona virus.

“They were, as far as we know, unrelated to any COVID-19 regime – but they happened and were managed very professionally by our staff and luckily no one was injured,” he told the ABC.

So far, there have been no confirmed cases of coronavirus in Australian prisons.

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