PG&E investigates & # 39; suspect & # 39; claim for emerald of $ 280 million

PG&E investigates & # 39; suspect & # 39; claim for $ 280 million emerald after & # 39; owner & # 39; claims it was destroyed in a deadly natural fire in California, started by the company's power lines

  • PG&E power lines were blamed for starting Camp Fire in California last year
  • One man wants compensation for an emerald of $ 280 million that he says has been destroyed
  • The company wants proof that it is really damaged and that it was trying to save it
Advertisements

Energy supplier PG&E investigates a & # 39; suspect & # 39; compensation claim from a man who says a 500-pound emerald has been destroyed in a deadly natural fire in California.

The man wants $ 280 million back for the precious stone after it was reportedly destroyed in last year's campfire, which was fueled by PG&E power lines.

According to court records, the Pacific Gas and Electric Company wants proof that the emerald was really damaged and that the owner was trying to save him from the fire.

The claim is one of the various questionable applications that PG&E investigates after the fire, Bloomberg reports.

Advertisements

On fire: a house burns in Paradise, California during last year's deadly campfire - which has given rise to serious & # 39; suspect & # 39; compensation claims

On fire: a house burns in Paradise, California during last year's deadly campfire – which has given rise to serious & # 39; suspect & # 39; compensation claims

The company is investigating & # 39; exceptionally large monetary claims that seem suspicious & # 39 ;, the court said.

PG&E is also investigating duplicate submissions, including four separate claims of $ 4.5 million by the emerald owner and his wife.

In the case of an emerald, PG&E wants proof that the owner tried to protect and protect the emerald during the fire & # 39 ;.

PG&E bosses also want to see & # 39; documents proving that the emerald has been damaged or destroyed & # 39 ;.

The 2018 campfire was the most destructive in California's history, killing 85 people and destroying nearly 14,000 homes.

Advertisements

California firefighters revealed in May of this year that PG&E power lines caused the fire that nearly destroyed the city of Paradise.

Faced with hundreds of lawsuits, the energy company filed for bankruptcy in January and the damages could amount to more than $ 30 billion.

The negotiations, however, get stuck at a time when shareholders and creditors are fighting in the bankruptcy court for the future of the company.

Wreck: a representation of homes destroyed by the campfire attributed to the power lines of PG&E in California

Wreck: a representation of homes destroyed by the campfire attributed to the power lines of PG&E in California

Wreck: a representation of homes destroyed by the campfire attributed to the power lines of PG&E in California

Under fire: the CEO of the energy company, Bill Johnson, speaks with Californian lawmakers in Sacramento yesterday
Advertisements

Under fire: the CEO of the energy company, Bill Johnson, speaks with Californian lawmakers in Sacramento yesterday

Under fire: the CEO of the energy company, Bill Johnson, speaks with Californian lawmakers in Sacramento yesterday

Democratic Governor Gavin Newsom has threatened to intervene if the company cannot reach an agreement, including a possible state takeover.

In addition, fire service investigators in California have determined that PG&E caused 18 forest fires in 2017.

Yesterday, the company told customers it could turn off electricity due to strong winds that could cause further forest fires.

Advertisements

The latest planned blackout is expected to affect 660,000 people in parts of 22 provinces, including the suburbs of San Francisco.

PG&E officials were already confronted last month with the whims of legislators about massive disruptions, including one that affected nearly 2.5 million people.

Yesterday, the company's CEO, Bill Johnson, told California lawmakers that PG&E was not fully prepared for the consequences of the blackouts.

& # 39; We were not as well prepared as we thought, and we needed to pay a little more attention – much more attention – to impacts after turning off the power, & # 39; he said.

The company, based in San Francisco, has more than 16 million electric and gas customers.

Advertisements

. [TagsToTranslate] Dailymail

- Advertisement -