WhatsNew2Day - Latest News And Breaking Headlines
Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

People in the UK would push a fat man over a bridge to stop a runaway train that kills five people

Three out of five people in the UK would push a fat man across a bridge to stop a runaway train that kills five people, much more than in China, Japan and Korea

  • People were asked if they would actively kill one person to save five people
  • Three out of five people asked in the UK said they would kill only one individual
  • The researchers wanted to understand the morale of people in different countries.
  • They discovered that Western countries would actively kill one person to save many
  • They say this could be because Western cultures are more open to “talk.”

Three out of five people in the UK would push a fat man from a bridge to stop a train that kills five people, much more than in China, Japan and Korea, according to a study.

Exeter University researchers wanted to understand the morale of people around the world, so they were asked the famous ‘car question’.

The question asks whether someone would actively kill a single person, in this case pushing a fat man out of a bridge, to save a larger group of people.

It may be that people in the UK have more prejudices against overweight people, but researchers say it is more likely that Britons are not afraid to express their opinion.

Scroll down to watch the video

View of the end of the pedestrian street La Rambla, called ‘La Rambla del Mar’, which is a swing bridge in the marina of Port Vell, Barcelona, ​​Spain. The study examines whether people would kill a single person by pushing them off a bridge to save five people under the bridge. Stock Image

In the United Kingdom, almost 60 percent of the people asked said that the fat man should be pushed and killed to save the lives of the five people.

That was the fourth highest result in a league table of 42 countries.

Dr. Edmond Awad, first author of the Exeter University study, said: “We know from previous studies that people who say they would sacrifice a person to save more are considered less reliable.”

“Choosing to push the big man on the catwalk can be seen by many as horrible, but on the other hand it saves five lives.”

“It seems that the approval of this election has steadily increased in recent decades,” he added.

“So these findings certainly do not suggest that people in the UK are more evil!”

The study asked people if an animated man should save the five people on a railroad track by changing the car to another track, where only one more person would stop and be killed.

On a website called Moral machine, people were asked if the lively man should push a fat man out of the bridge.

It is important to note that he could not throw himself off the bridge to stop the train car, since his body was not large enough to stop him.

As a general rule, people in Western countries were more willing than those in Eastern countries to change course, or sacrifice fat men, to save more lives.

High rates of people willing to sacrifice fat men in the US were observed. USA, United Kingdom and Australia, but low rates were observed in China, Japan and Korea, where people are less likely to admit this ‘morally questionable’ view.

Train tracks leading to sunset. As a general rule, people in Western countries were more willing than those in Eastern countries to change course and actively kill a single individual instead of allowing a group of five to passively die.

Train tracks leading to sunset. As a general rule, people in Western countries were more willing than those in Eastern countries to change course and actively kill a single individual instead of allowing a group of five to passively die.

Train tracks leading to sunset. As a general rule, people in Western countries were more willing than those in Eastern countries to change course and actively kill a single individual instead of allowing a group of five to passively die.

In traditional communities, where people can stay in nearby and small communities throughout their lives for financial and cultural reasons, they don’t want to alienate people by suggesting they would kill someone, experts suggest.

In Western countries, where it is easier to move on and find new social groups if someone does not agree with you, people may find it easier to express or think such thoughts.

The study asked 70,000 people in 42 countries about the ethical dilemma, although most of those who interacted with the website were young adults, men and university students.

Overall, 81 percent were willing to change the car to a separate train track to kill a person instead of five, and half would throw the fat man into the tracks.

The second option is seen as very difficult, according to the investigation, because it involves an act of physical violence.

The findings have been published in the magazine. procedures of the National Academy of Sciences.

WHAT IS THE TROLLEY PROBLEM?

The car problem is a mental experiment that dates back to 1905.

Classic view of the traditional traditional cable cars that circulate along the famous California street in the morning light at sunrise. Would you push a person on the slopes to save five?

Classic view of the traditional traditional cable cars that circulate along the famous California street in the morning light at sunrise. Would you push a person on the slopes to save five?

Classic view of the traditional traditional cable cars that circulate along the famous California street in the morning light at sunrise. Would you push a person on the slopes to save five?

It was first raised in a moral questionnaire given to university students of the University of Wisconsin.

However, the idea has persisted with new versions raised regularly and is still included in the research of moral psychology.

It is considered a classic clash between two schools of moral thought: utilitarianism and ethical ethics.

It usually takes this form:

  • A runaway car (car) rushes down the train tracks.
  • Forward on the slopes there are five people tied and unable to move.
  • The car goes directly to them.
  • You are standing at a distance in the courtyard next to a level where you can change the track where the car goes down.
  • There is a person on the side track to whom the car would move if you pull the level.

Do you take out the level and actively kill one person or leave the car to continue on its way and passively let five people kill?

.