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The attacking lineman of the patriots Joe Thuney deliberately failed to answer 11 of the 50 questions about the NFL Wonderlic test, which is supposed to give teams an idea of ​​the intelligence of a possible draw. Still, out of the 39 problems that Thuney tried to solve, he scored 39 correct answers
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Fearing that he is & # 39; too smart & # 39; can be considered to play in the NFL, the attacking lineman Joe Thuney of New England Patriots was advised not to answer all questions about the competition's cognitive skill test during the pre-draft combine in 2016.

The origin of the advice remains unclear, but Fansided reported that Thuney – a decorated scholar athlete in the state of North Carolina – had intentionally failed to answer 11 of the 50 questions about the NFL Wonderlic test, which is believed to give teams an idea of ​​the intelligence of a possible concept pick.

Still, out of the 39 problems that Thuney tried to solve, he scored 39 correct answers.

Thuney was chosen in the third round of the NFL Draft 2016 and has since started every game of his three-year career while winning a few Super Bowls.

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The attacking lineman of the patriots Joe Thuney deliberately failed to answer 11 of the 50 questions about the NFL Wonderlic test, which is supposed to give teams an idea of ​​the intelligence of a possible draw. Still, out of the 39 problems that Thuney tried to solve, he scored 39 correct answers

North Carolina State offensive lineman Joe Thuney in action during the 2016 NFL Scouting combine at Lucas Oil Stadium

North Carolina State offensive lineman Joe Thuney in action during the 2016 NFL Scouting combine at Lucas Oil Stadium

The attacking lineman of the patriots Joe Thuney deliberately failed to answer 11 of the 50 questions about the NFL Wonderlic test, which is supposed to give teams an idea of ​​the intelligence of a possible draw. Still, out of the 39 problems that Thuney tried to solve, he scored 39 correct answers. (Right) Thuney participates in the 2016 NFL pre-draft combine

Thuney has started every game in his three-year career and has won two Super Bowls

Thuney has started every game in his three-year career and has won two Super Bowls

Thuney has started every game in his three-year career and has won two Super Bowls

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Despite his failure to answer every question about the Wonderlic, Thuney was already known as very intelligent before it was drafted.

He was a finalist for the Campbell Trophy, which goes to college footballer with the best academics, community service and field performance.

Previous winners of the award include former Florida quarterback, Tim Tebow, and Penn Offensive lineman John Urschel, who later left the NFL to pursue a mathematical career.

Fear of being & # 39; too smart & # 39; to be considered for the NFL is not new.

Former Pittsburgh Steelers and Arizona Cardinals who felt Rashard Mendenhall felt the same before they abruptly withdrew in 2013 to become screenwriters for & # 39; Ballers & # 39; from HBO.

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& # 39; When I went through the NFL Combine, there was a team that asked me: "If you have all those other interests – such as reading, dancing or art – what makes you a soccer player?" Mendenhall told Mel Radio in 2016. & # 39; There is an idea of ​​what a football player is and what he looks like. Especially playing in a place like Pittsburgh, where the Steelers are so part of the history of the city; the fans live, die and breathe it in.

The Wonderlic test was made in 1936 by E. F. Wonderlic to measure cognitive ability in mathematics, vocabulary and reasoning. The average score for a chemist was 31, according to a Wonderlic manual from 1983

The Wonderlic test was made in 1936 by E. F. Wonderlic to measure cognitive ability in mathematics, vocabulary and reasoning. The average score for a chemist was 31, according to a Wonderlic manual from 1983

The Wonderlic test was made in 1936 by E. F. Wonderlic to measure cognitive ability in mathematics, vocabulary and reasoning. The average score for a chemist was 31, according to a Wonderlic manual from 1983

& # 39; Although I fully respected that culture and knew that I was part of it, I found it difficult, & # 39; he continued. & # 39; I would tweet a photo of a book I was reading and there would be people who would write, such as: "Why do you read books? You should read a playbook."

& # 39; I was like: "Dang, this is the low season."

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For comparison, Thuney & # 39; s teammate Tom Brady scored a 33 on the Wonderlic, Green Bay Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers had a 35, and one player, former Cincinnati Bengals punter / broad receiver Pat McInally, scored a perfect 50. Journeyman quarterback Ryan Fitzpatrick , who attended Harvard scored a 49, as did former Philadelphia Eagles linebacker / defending end Mike Mamula.

Other less impressive scores were noted by former Tennessee Titans quarterback Vince Young (six), former Oakland Raiders kicker Sebastian Janikowski (nine), and free agent cornerback Morris Claiborne, who had the lowest recorded score of an NFL player ever ( four) according to PFT.com.

The Wonderlic test was made in 1936 by E. F. Wonderlic to measure cognitive ability in mathematics, vocabulary and reasoning.

The average score for a chemist was 31, according to a Wonderlic manual from 1983.

Tom Brady (pictured on Thursday Patriots training camp) scored a 33 on the Wonderlic Test

Tom Brady (pictured on Thursday Patriots training camp) scored a 33 on the Wonderlic Test

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Tom Brady (pictured on Thursday Patriots training camp) scored a 33 on the Wonderlic Test

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