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Novak Djokovic: Russian tennis star Andrey Rublev entered Australia with Covid

Russian tennis star Andrey Rublev says he was allowed to enter the country for the Australian Open despite Covid.

The 24-year-old contracted the virus before his arrival and still tested positive when he landed in Australia.

“When I flew to Australia I was still positive but the level of Covid SS, as it is called, I won’t lie, it was very low and not dangerous,” he said. Sports club.

‘I was allowed to enter the country. In addition, I was quarantined for more than ten days.’

Rublev said he is no longer being tested as he has recovered from the virus after testing positive on December 27.

Russian tennis star Andrey Rublev has said he was allowed to enter Victoria for the Australian Open despite Covid

Russian tennis star Andrey Rublev has said he was allowed to enter Victoria for the Australian Open despite Covid

After testing positive, Rublev announced on Twitter that he had been fully vaccinated and isolated prior to the tournament.

“I have minimal symptoms. I am in isolation and following all protocols under the supervision of doctors,” he said.

“Now I have to recover and I won’t go to Melbourne until it’s safe for everyone. I am very upset and concerned about what is happening

“I’ll be back to court as soon as possible.”

According to the Australian Government Health Department’s website, international travelers who have had Covid and recovered but still test positive can apply for a medical waiver.

At check-in they must have a positive result of the PCR test taken no more than three days before their flight and a certificate from their GP.

The certificate must contain “a statement that the person has had the coronavirus known as Covid-19 but has now recovered and is not considered contagious.”

It must also show that 14 days have passed since the first positive PCR test and that the person has had no symptoms in the past 72 hours.

‘If your Covid-19 PCR test result is positive and you do not hold a certificate stating the above information, you and any primary close contacts in your travel party should not go to the airport as you will not be get on board,” the website says.

The shocking revelation comes after world No. 1 Novak Djokovic was expelled from the country after being denied his vaccination exemption.

The official reasons why Novak Djokovic (pictured at Melbourne airport after the verdict) was deported from Australia have been published by the federal court, with the judges siding with immigration minister Alex Hawke on all grounds.

The official reasons why Novak Djokovic (pictured at Melbourne airport after the verdict) was deported from Australia have been published by the federal court, with the judges siding with immigration minister Alex Hawke on all grounds.

The official reasons why Novak Djokovic (pictured at Melbourne airport after the verdict) was deported from Australia have been published by the federal court, with the judges siding with immigration minister Alex Hawke on all grounds.

The 34-year-old faced a lengthy legal battle to try to stay in the country, but was eventually sent back to Serbia on Sunday.

In a verdict delivered on Thursday, the federal court ruled it was clearly open that immigration minister Alex Hawke had determined that Djokovic had refused to be vaccinated before entering Australia.

That is even despite Djokovic’s claims that he was unable to get vaccinated before entering Australia, having contracted Covid-19 on December 16.

The court also found that Secretary of State Hawke was right to be concerned that Djokovic’s stance on vaccines could encourage anti-vaccination sentiment in Australia.

Djokovic’s presence in Australia “could encourage demonstrations and protests that could lead to increased community transference,” the judges said.

The tennis ace originally had his visa canceled on his arrival at Melbourne Airport on January 5 due to inconsistencies in his declaration form, which resulted in an exception for not having been vaccinated against Covid.

He was subsequently detained before successfully winning an appeal, but Mr Hawke used his discretionary powers to revoke the visa.

Djokovic took the matter to Federal Court in a last-ditch bid to enter the Australian Open, chasing his 10th title at the tournament.

But the judges agreed that the immigration minister had to be satisfied with the potential risk to the “health, safety or good order” of the community.

The tennis ace (pictured with wife Jelena) originally had his visa canceled upon his arrival at Melbourne Airport on January 5 due to inconsistencies in his declaration form, which resulted in him being given an exception for not having been vaccinated against Covid

The tennis ace (pictured with wife Jelena) originally had his visa canceled upon his arrival at Melbourne Airport on January 5 due to inconsistencies in his declaration form, which resulted in him being given an exception for not having been vaccinated against Covid

The tennis ace (pictured with wife Jelena) originally had his visa canceled upon his arrival at Melbourne Airport on January 5 due to inconsistencies in his declaration form, which resulted in him being given an exception for not having been vaccinated against Covid

‘It is not that Mr Djokovic poses a risk to the health, safety or good order of the Australian community; rather, it is a question of whether the minister was convinced that his presence is or could be or could be such a risk within the meaning of (the Migration Act).

‘The satisfaction of the minister is not an unmentionable personal state of mind. The law is clear what it takes.

“If, after review by a court, it appears that the satisfaction has been unreasonably obtained or could not be achieved on reasonable substantive or lawful grounds, it shall not be considered a legal remedy for the purposes of the law. ‘

Rublev will face Marin Cilic in the third round of the Australian Open.

More to come

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