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New Met Police chief ‘must stamp out wokery in the force and axe at least 40 senior officers’

New Met Police chief ‘must wipe out unrest in the force and ax at least 40 senior officers to reform Scotland Yard’ warns ex-commissioner

  • Ex-Commissioner Lord Stevens has called for low-level crime and disorder to be taken seriously as new chief Sir Mark Rowley begins his new role in the police force.
  • In the foreword to a police report released this week, he urged officers to “stop ignoring shoplifters, antisocial neighbors and aggressive beggars.”
  • Report recommends firing at least a quarter of top 40 senior police officers

Scotland Yard’s new boss must prove to the public that ‘every act of crime’ matters and eradicate unrest in the force, a former commissioner warned yesterday (Fri).

Lord Stevens, who led Britain’s largest force from 2000 to 2005, has called for low-level crime and disorder that destroys lives to be taken seriously.

In a foreword to a major police report co-written by Bill Bratton, former chief of both New York and Los Angeles police departments, Lord Stevens recommends an “urgent and major turnaround of the Met,” involving incoming leader Sir Mark Rowley says there has been a reversal of the ‘eroding’ of neighborhood policing: “The Commissioner will have to prove to Londoners that under his leadership every crime or disorder matters, every individual case and every neighborhood matters.”

Lord Stevens (pictured), who led Britain's largest fighting force from 2000 to 2005, has called for low-level crime and disorder that destroys lives to be taken seriously

Lord Stevens (pictured), who led Britain’s largest fighting force from 2000 to 2005, has called for low-level crime and disorder that destroys lives to be taken seriously

Rising leader Sir Mark Rowley (pictured) will begin his new role in the armed forces next Monday

Rising leader Sir Mark Rowley (pictured) will begin his new role in the armed forces next Monday

The new commissioner, who starts Monday after Cressida Dick’s departure, must “address the elements of the Met culture that permit crime, serious misconduct or incompetence” with zero tolerance for bad behavior, he said.

In the Policy Exchange report, Lord Stevens urges Sir Mark to root out wary gestures and impartiality by saying: ‘The only way different communities can trust the police to do this fairly is if the public can trust it. confidence that police officers act with unquestionable impartiality. , and humanity.

“Even the perception that an officer’s decision-making can be influenced by a partisan political view can damage the public’s confidence that the police are being conducted fairly.

That recent UK poll found that ‘the public were almost twice as likely to agree than to disagree with the statement that ‘police are more interested in waking up to than solving crimes’. should concern us all.”

The report titled “Policing can win,” written by former senior officer David Spencer, recommends an action plan for the commissioner’s first 100 days, including a removal of top officers within the force, killing at least a quarter of the current top 40 senior police officers. is fired.

The recommendation comes after a survey published last October found that only 39 percent of Met officers trust senior leaders.

Former Met Police Commissioner Cressida Dick (pictured) recently stepped down from the role

Former Met Police Commissioner Cressida Dick (pictured) recently stepped down from the role

“There should be a reduction in the number of senior officers in the Met,” the report said. “The current situation at The Met strongly suggests that having more senior leaders does not necessarily equate to better leadership in the organization.”

It is further recommended that the number of commanders in the force be reduced from 19 to ‘no more than 11’, while the positions of deputy assistant commissioner should be reduced from ten to ‘no more than six’.

Mr Spencer also suggests reviewing the police’s monitoring process through random drug testing and an annual recheck, which would also include checking officers’ social media.

The report also proposes bringing in “new blood” from outside the Corps to fill some senior positions, and plans to bring former officers back to the Met.

This could include the introduction of fast track promotions for some junior officers, allowing them to go straight to senior management.

David Spencer, the report’s author, said: ‘The Met has been in a permanent crisis in recent years.

“A program of radical reform is needed. Everything must be on the table, even changes that were previously dismissed as too radical. Every Londoner counts on Sir Mark and his team to succeed.”

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