NASA Rover that could bring samples from Mars to Earth

Airbus' initial design for the mobile browser: ESA has now awarded a $ 5.2 million contract to design a concept for a mobile vehicle that can collect those samples on the red planet.

NASA and ESA are coming together to bring back a piece of Mars back to Earth, and have awarded the first contracts for the pioneer mission.

Airbus has won two studies from the European Space Agency (ESA) to design a Sample Fetch Rover and an Earth Return Orbiter.

These two elements will be critical parts of a mission to return samples of the planet Mars to Earth before the end of the next decade.

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Airbus' initial design for the mobile browser: ESA has now awarded a $ 5.2 million contract to design a concept for a mobile vehicle that can collect those samples on the red planet.

Airbus' initial design for the mobile browser: ESA has now awarded a $ 5.2 million contract to design a concept for a mobile vehicle that can collect those samples on the red planet.

NASA and ESA signed a letter of intent in April 2018 to carry out the Mars Sample Return mission.

It will demand at least three missions from Earth, starting with the NASA Mars Rover 2020, but the last step would be to launch a rocket from the surface of Mars, a feat that had never been done before.

"Bringing samples from Mars is essential in more than one way," said David Parker, Director of Human Exploration and Robotics at ESA.

"First, understand why Mars, although it is the planet most similar to Earth, took an evolutionary path very different from that of Earth and second, fully understand the Martian environment to allow humans someday to work and live on the Red Planet .

"I am very happy that with these two studies being commissioned and in combination with other studies conducted elsewhere in Europe, let us take another important step to explore Mars."

HOW WILL SOIL SAMPLES REACH THE EARTH FROM MARS?

After its launch to Mars in 2026, the Mars Sample Fetch Rover will retrieve the samples from Mars left by the Mars2020 rover.

This NASA rover will leave 36 sample tubes the size of a ballpoint pen on the Martian surface ready to be picked up later.

The Sample Fetch Rover will collect the sample tubes, carry them back and load them into a sample container inside the waiting Mars Ascension Vehicle.

The Sample Fetch Rover will collect the sample tubes, carry them back and load them into a sample container inside the waiting Mars Ascension Vehicle.

The Sample Fetch Rover will collect the sample tubes, carry them back and load them into a sample container inside the waiting Mars Ascension Vehicle.

The Sample Fetch Rover will collect the sample tubes, carry them back and load them into a sample container inside the waiting Mars Ascension Vehicle.

The Mars ascension vehicle will launch from the surface and put the sample container into orbit around Mars.

As a third part of the mission, ESA's Earth Return Orbiter will capture the sample container the size of a basketball that orbits Mars, seal it within a biocontainment system and return the samples to Earth.

The Mars ascension vehicle will launch from the surface and put the sample container into orbit around Mars.

The Mars ascension vehicle will launch from the surface and put the sample container into orbit around Mars.

The Mars ascension vehicle will launch from the surface and put the sample container into orbit around Mars.

The samples will re-enter the Earth's atmosphere and land in the USA. UU Before the end of the next decade.

Scientists from around the world will be able to study the samples using the latest laboratory equipment and analysis techniques in the coming years.

Ben Boyes, Airbus Project Manager for the Sample Fetch Rover study, said: "With the combined experience of ESA and NASA, this historic mission is ambitious and technologically very advanced, with two rovers interacting together on Mars for the first time.

"An initial double launch from the surface of the planet and the transfer in orbit of the samples means that it will be possible for the first time to directly study the soil of Mars in the laboratories of the Earth."

Both the Sample Fetch Rover and the Earth Return Orbiter are part of the Return of Samples of Mars mission proposed by ESA-NASA that aims to be approved at the ESA Council in 2019 at the ministerial level.

UK Science Minister Sam Gyimah said: "This extraordinary new project, which will allow to see samples brought from Mars to Earth for the first time, demonstrates the leading scientific and engineering innovation in the world of Great Britain.

Winning this contract is based on the worldwide recognized experience in the UK in space and robotics that the government is supporting through the UK Space Agency and the major investments in our modern Industrial Strategy.

The samples will be placed in an armored and biologically isolated container to protect it on the trip back to Earth. The purpose of the container is to ensure that the samples not only survive, but that the samples are not contaminated with the microbes of the Earth or Earth by any microbe that may contain.

The samples will be placed in an armored and biologically isolated container to protect it on the trip back to Earth. The purpose of the container is to ensure that the samples not only survive, but that the samples are not contaminated with the microbes of the Earth or Earth by any microbe that may contain.

The samples will be placed in an armored and biologically isolated container to protect it on the trip back to Earth. The purpose of the container is to ensure that the samples not only survive, but that the samples are not contaminated with the microbes of the Earth or Earth by any microbe that may contain.

ESA astronaut Tim Peake said: "This is a new exciting era where companies and space agencies are working more closely than ever on ambitious missions to expand our knowledge of the Solar System and deliver benefits to people's lives.

"The close collaboration between the United Kingdom and ESA will put Britain at the forefront of innovative missions to explore the Moon, Mars and beyond."

The plan will begin with NASA's Mars 2020 spacecraft, which will collect Martian soil in up to 32 containers the size of a ballpoint pen.

ESA's ExoMars rover, which will reach the red planet in 2021, will simultaneously drill deep into the surface to look for evidence of life.

ExoMars will drill up to two meters.

The second step of the mission will launch a & # 39; rover fetch & # 39 ;, which will retrieve the samples from the other rovers.

Then, he would return to his lander and place the samples in a small rocket called the Mars Ascent Vehicle.

This will launch the container containing the samples into the orbit of Mars, where it will be collected by a spacecraft, which would require its own separate launch from Earth.

The samples will be placed in an armored and biologically isolated container to protect it on the trip back to Earth.

The purpose of the container is to ensure that the samples not only survive, but that the samples are not contaminated with the microbes of the Earth or Earth by any microbe that may contain.

The samples will land somewhere in the United States by 2030 before being distributed to laboratories around the world.

NASA and ESA are coming together to bring a piece of Mars to Earth. The two space agencies today signed a declaration of intent to investigate the ways in which future missions could collect soil samples from the red planet.

NASA and ESA are coming together to bring a piece of Mars to Earth. The two space agencies today signed a declaration of intent to investigate the ways in which future missions could collect soil samples from the red planet.

NASA and ESA are coming together to bring a piece of Mars to Earth. The two space agencies today signed a declaration of intent to investigate the ways in which future missions could collect soil samples from the red planet.

The opportunity to analyze the Martian soil would provide unprecedented access to the history of the red planet and its potential to house life.

"The previous Mars missions revealed ancient riverbeds and the correct chemistry that could have supported microbial life on the red planet," said Thomas Zurbuchen, NASA Associate Administrator for the Directorate of Scientific Mission.

"A sample would provide a critical breakthrough in our understanding of Mars' potential to house life.

WHAT IS THE MISSION OF EXOMARS?

The main objective of ExoMars is to discover if life ever existed on Mars.

The spacecraft in which the Schiaparelli traveled to Mars, Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), carries a probe to study trace gases such as methane throughout the planet.

Scientists believe that methane, a chemical that on Earth is strongly linked to life.

The second part of the ExoMars mission, delayed until 2020, will deliver a rover to the surface of Mars.

It will be the first with the ability to move across the surface of the planet and drill into the ground to collect and analyze samples.

Schiaparelli was designed to test technologies for the rover's landing in four years, but it crashed into the red planet in October 2016.

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