More Covid-19 Pfizer shots head to Australia as Scott Morrison finalizes deal

Scott Morrison is finalizing a new international vaccine deal to bring hundreds of thousands of Pfizer doses to Australia, with an announcement expected this week.

Two weeks ago, the Prime Minister bought 1 million doses from Poland, giving half to Covid-ravaged NSW and dividing the rest between the other states and territories.

Daily Mail Australia understands that a second deal is expected to be announced within days – but sources have remained silent on which country the doses will come from and the exact amount, while details are finalized.

A second international vaccine deal is expected to be announced this week.  Pictured: Vaccine queues at Sydney's Qudos Bank Arena

A second international vaccine deal is expected to be announced this week. Pictured: Vaccine queues at Sydney’s Qudos Bank Arena

Scott Morrison is finalizing a new international vaccine deal to bring hundreds of thousands of Pfizer doses to Australia.  Pictured: Pfizer Doses Arrive at Sydney Airport in February

Scott Morrison is finalizing a new international vaccine deal to bring hundreds of thousands of Pfizer doses to Australia.  Pictured: Pfizer Doses Arrive at Sydney Airport in February

Scott Morrison is finalizing a new international vaccine deal to bring hundreds of thousands of Pfizer doses to Australia. Pictured: Pfizer Doses Arrive at Sydney Airport in February

The doses will be distributed to states per capita after Victoria complained that NSW received preferential treatment last time.

“I am very keen to ensure that we see nothing but a proper proportional distribution of any additional vaccines, and the Prime Minister has given me that commitment,” Prime Minister Daniel Andrews said on Sunday.

In a press conference on Friday, Mr Morrison said he was working on several deals that would give him the confidence to open vaccinations to younger teens from September 13.

‘In terms of dosages, we have promising leads. I can’t confirm that at the moment, but we’ve been working on it for a while,” he said.

“That gives us more confidence that we can go ahead with this decision to vaccinate children aged 12 to 15 in particular.”

Young people under 18 can only get Pfizer because AstraZeneca is not licensed for children.

Australia’s first shipment of the Moderna vaccine – which is similar to Pfizer – will arrive shortly with one million doses in September, then another three million in October, November and December.

As of Saturday, 34.16 percent of over 16s have been fully vaccinated and 57.47 percent have had dose one.

Australia has an abundance of AstraZeneca vaccines, but Pfizer’s supply — which is preferred for those under 60 — is tight, with several states and territories asking for more.

Meanwhile, the federal government continues to pressure prime ministers to stick to the national reopening plan, which will end lockdowns in two phases when 70 and 80 percent of people over 16 are vaccinated.

The plan, which opens international borders when 80 percent is poked, makes no mention of state borders – but Mr Morrison and treasurer Josh Frydenberg have encouraged cautious leaders to open up because eliminating Covid is unsustainable.

Coolangatta residents on the New South Wales-Queensland border protest restrictions on Sunday

Coolangatta residents on the New South Wales-Queensland border protest restrictions on Sunday

Coolangatta residents on the New South Wales-Queensland border protest restrictions on Sunday

Some states threaten to keep their borders closed or demand higher jab rates before lifting lockdowns, raising prospects that Australia will remain a divided country for months to come

After a national cabinet meeting on Friday, Western Australian Prime Minister Mark McGowan stated he would not “deliberately infect” his citizens and insisted he would keep state borders closed if WA was Covid-free when it reached the 70 percent mark. vaccination threshold.

The federal government is currently supporting states’ restrictions with business bailouts and direct payments of $750 a week to workers – but Mr Frydenberg says the tap will soon be turned off, leaving every pro-lockdown state to support itself.

“When it comes to federal government support, which now exceeds $1 billion a week, I’ve been very clear that there can be no expectation from the states and territories that that support can be expected once we get that 70 percent.” achieved and 80 percent targets,” he told Sunrise Monday morning.

Asked if he threatened to cut their money, Mr Frydenberg added: ‘The federal economic support we are now providing cannot be expected to continue in that way.’

Western Australian Prime Minister Mark McGowan said he would not “deliberately infect” his citizens. Pictured: Cottesloe Beach in Restricted WA

Pressured by whether states keeping their borders closed would plunge Australia into recession, the treasurer said: ‘Well, it will certainly cost jobs. It will certainly close businesses. It will see our debt burden grow and it will see the well-being of Australians suffer.

“You could have the ridiculous situation where someone in NSW can travel to Canada before they can go to Cairns or someone in Victoria can travel to Singapore and Bali before they can go to Perth. That would be ridiculous.

“That is why it is so important that the agreed national plan is respected by the states and the territories,” he said.

Labor leader Anthony Albanese said the federal government was trying to engage in a fight with Labor states and insisted McGowan and Queensland Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk had not threatened to derail the plan.

What are the four stages of opening?

A. Vaccinating, preparing and testing (from 14 July)

Arrival caps halved to 3,035 per week; early, severe and short lockdowns if outbreaks occur; trials of seven-day home quarantine for vaccinated arrivals in South Australia; medicare vaccination certificates available in apps like Apple Wallet

B. Post-vaccination phase (when 70 percent will be stung, expected by the end of this year)

Lockdowns less likely but possible; vaccinated people face reduced disabilities; limits for unvaccinated arrivals increased; a larger limit for vaccinated arrivals with ‘reduced quarantine requirements’; limited entry for students and economic visa holders

C. Consolidation Phase (when 80 percent is pricked, time not announced)

Only ‘highly targeted’ lockdowns; lifting of all outbound travel restrictions for vaccinated travellers; no limits for vaccinated arrivals; increased limits for students and visa holders; more travel bubbles arise with countries like Singapore; booster shots rolled out

D. Final phase (percentage or time not disclosed)

Unlimited arrivals for vaccinated people without any quarantine and unlimited arrivals for unvaccinated people with pre-departure and on-arrival testing

.