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Schumacher (top right) is now being looked after by Professor Philippe Menasche (bottom right), who specializes in stem cell research. The procedure he will go through, which remains secret, was initially planned for July, but an & # 39; unexpected health problem & # 39; was the basis of the plan. A method developed by Professor Menasche is the grafting of stem cells on damaged heart tissue. The results have shown that it is safe

The great Michael Schumacher from Formula 1 is expected to finally undergo a groundbreaking stem cell treatment today after a six-week delay.

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The seven-time world champion was admitted to a hospital in Paris yesterday under strict surveillance for treatment by a leading heart specialist.

He has not been seen in public since brain damage in a life-changing ski accident in the French Alps almost six years ago, leaving him in a coma for six months.

Schumacher is now being looked after by Professor Philippe Menasche, who specializes in stem cell research. The procedure, which remains secret, was initially planned for July, but an & # 39; unexpected health problem & # 39; completed the plan.

However, a cardiologist said today that the stem cell procedures that Professor Menasche has studied in patients with heart failure are purely & # 39; experimental & # 39; and have not been proven to work.

Scientific articles have proven that his method – the grafting of stem cells on damaged heart tissue – is safe, but not that it restores heart function.

NHS cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra told MailOnline that there is & # 39; no good quality data & # 39; are that stem cell treatments can benefit the heart and said it suggests that Schumacher may have a cardiovascular problem.

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Schumacher (top right) is now being looked after by Professor Philippe Menasche (bottom right), who specializes in stem cell research. The procedure he will go through, which remains secret, was initially planned for July, but an & # 39; unexpected health problem & # 39; was the basis of the plan. A method developed by Professor Menasche is the grafting of stem cells on damaged heart tissue. The results have shown that it is safe

Schumacher (top right) is now being looked after by Professor Philippe Menasche (bottom right), who specializes in stem cell research. The procedure he will go through, which remains secret, was initially planned for July, but an & # 39; unexpected health problem & # 39; was the basis of the plan. A method developed by Professor Menasche is the grafting of stem cells on damaged heart tissue. The results have shown that it is safe

Michael Schumacher was admitted to a hospital in Paris earlier on Monday for & # 39; secret treatment & # 39;

Michael Schumacher was admitted to a hospital in Paris earlier on Monday for & # 39; secret treatment & # 39;

Michael Schumacher was admitted to a hospital in Paris earlier on Monday for & # 39; secret treatment & # 39;

Schumacher was taken to the Pompidou Hospital in southwest Paris on Monday afternoon

He said: & # 39; The idea is to insert stem cells to replenish tissue that has been damaged by a heart attack or other problem.

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& # 39; That suggests that Schumacher may have had a heart problem when he had his accident, or even developed one since then. & # 39;

In January, the Schumacher family issued a statement that the 50-year-old in & # 39; the best hands & # 39; used to be.

The wall of secrecy, enforced at the request of his wife Corinna, was erected to protect one of the greatest names in modern sports time.

The newspaper Le Parisien reported yesterday that he was on a stretcher in Hôpital Européen Georges Pompidou, covered with a blue cloth that & # 39; yesterday afternoon & # 39; his body and face completely covered & # 39 ;.

The security team was comprised of & # 39; about ten people & # 39 ;, said the news channel and added that Professor Menasche & # 39; was in charge of the & # 39; group.

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Schumacher had originally arrived in a blue and yellow ambulance registered in Geneva. He is expected at home tomorrow after a treatment today.

Professor Menasche, in turn, said that details of Schumacher's treatment & # 39; secret & # 39; due to medical secrecy.

Schumacher depicted next to his wife Corinna in the ski area of ​​Madonna di Campiglio

Schumacher depicted next to his wife Corinna in the ski area of ​​Madonna di Campiglio

Schumacher depicted next to his wife Corinna in the ski area of ​​Madonna di Campiglio

HAVE TESTS SHOWN THAT THE TREATMENT OF THE STEM CELL WORKS?

Professor Menasche and colleagues proved that the technique was safe in 2018, after testing on six patients who had had a heart attack.

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The patients, none of whom were named, had a patch with millions of human stem cells attached to their failing left ventricles.

It was confirmed via a coronary artery bypass, a procedure that is often performed in patients with heart disease to guide blood around clogged arteries.

Two patients died – but neither was directly linked to surgery, according to the British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy.

The results of the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, also showed that the treatment was safe.

None of the patients developed tumors called teratomas, which is considered an expected side effect from the use of undifferentiated stem cells.

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This is because the stem cells that the doctors used & # 39; differentiated & # 39; were and were ready to become heart muscle or to form blood vessels.

Professor Menasche and colleagues also reported no evidence of increased arrhythmic events, despite animal studies suggesting it was a possibility.

The BSGCT reported that some improvement in & # 39; cardiac movement & # 39; was observed in parts of the patch – but the authors have not attributed this to their technique.

Instead, the team of doctors admitted that the benefits could be due to the coronary artery bypass surgery they had performed.

According to other sources, Schumacher made at least two visits to the Georges Pompidou European Hospital earlier this year.

On both occasions he arrived by helicopter from Switzerland and landed at a heliport in Issy-les-Moulineaux, near Paris.

He initially had tests at the Pitie-Salpetriere hospital, where Professor Menasche is a member of the board of directors of the Brain and Spinal Cord Institute.

Le Parisien reported: & # 39; At the end of July the driver would return for a new session at the Georges Pompidou European Hospital.

& # 39; But an unexpected health problem prevented this. The treatment was postponed until early this week, when Professor Menasche returned from vacation. & # 39;

Professor Menasche & # 39; are known to perform surgery in the morning before devoting his afternoons to laboratory testing.

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Schumacher spokeswoman Sabine Kehm declined to comment on the development.

& # 39; Cardiovascular complications are common after brain injury and are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, & # 39 ;, researchers wrote in the journal Continuous education in anesthesia Critical care and pain in 2011.

Dr. Mahlotra, who used to work at Frimley Park Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, wondered if Professor Menasche and colleagues were experimenting with the same technique that they tried on the heart of the brain.

He added: & # 39; Whatever the reason, it is experimental. Even with the heart it is still experimental, we do not yet have any data suggesting it is beneficial. & # 39;

The doctor, considered one of the most influential cardiologists in Britain, said: & # 39; If it doesn't hurt, give it a try. & # 39;

WHO IS THE PIONEER HEART SURGEON THAT TREATING MICHAEL SCHUMACHER WITH STEM CELLS?

Professor Menasché is a world expert in stem cell treatment
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Professor Menasché is a world expert in stem cell treatment

Professor Menasché is a world expert in stem cell treatment

Michael Schumacher was admitted to the Pompidou Hospital in Paris for treatment by Professor Philippe Menasche.

Professor Menasché is a cardiothoracic surgeon who, together with his colleagues, has long been using stem cells to repair damaged hearts.

Stem cells are not yet differentiated, which means they have the potential to develop into many of the different types of cells and tissues in the human body.

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Research on them has generated both excitement – that they can repair or replace damaged parts of the body – and controversy, since the most versatile stem cells are taken from embryos.

Professor Menasché and his laboratory work with different cell therapies to treat heart disease and injury.

They first focused on a type of stem cell called skeletal myoblasts.

These stem cells are not as versatile as embryonic stem cells, but can be taken from a patient's own skeletal muscle.

Professor Menasché treats Schumacher at the Pompidou Hospital in Paris

Professor Menasché treats Schumacher at the Pompidou Hospital in Paris

Professor Menasché treats Schumacher at the Pompidou Hospital in Paris

Scientists first started experimenting with transplanting these cells into the heart in 1995, hoping that they would help patients with heart disease or heart failure to grow new, stronger tissue.

Professor Menasché & # 39; s 2008 study was one of the most appreciated clinical trials of this method – but in the end, the procedure did not lead to better heart function for patients.

He has since switched to a new technique. Professor Menasche is now making tissue from bio-engineers and using it in combination with human embryonic stem cells that have been prepared to become heart tissue, called cardiac precursors.

In 2018 he published a study that demonstrated that these cells could be safely transplanted in patients with failing left ventricles.

Professor Menasché's team strives to use their technique to treat end-stage heart failure patients for whom more traditional treatments have failed – although it is unclear at what stage these studies are now.

However, NHS cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra told MailOnline that there is & # 39; no good quality data & # 39; that stem cell treatments can benefit the heart

However, NHS cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra told MailOnline that there is & # 39; no good quality data & # 39; that stem cell treatments can benefit the heart

However, NHS cardiologist Dr. Aseem Malhotra told MailOnline that there is & # 39; no good quality data & # 39; that stem cell treatments can benefit the heart

Professor Menasche is best known for performing & # 39; the world's first embryonic cell transplant in a heart failure patient in 2014.

The 69-year-old and colleagues proved that the technique was safe in 2018, after testing on six patients who had had a heart attack.

The patients, none of whom were named, had a patch with millions of human stem cells attached to their failing left ventricles.

It was confirmed via a coronary artery bypass, a procedure that is often performed in patients with heart disease to guide blood around clogged arteries.

Two patients died – but neither were directly linked to surgery, according to the British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy.

The results of the study, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, also showed that the treatment was safe.

None of the patients developed tumors called teratomas, which is considered an expected side effect from the use of undifferentiated stem cells.

This is because the stem cells that the doctors used & # 39; differentiated & # 39; were and were ready to become heart muscle or to form blood vessels.

Professor Menasche and colleagues also reported no evidence of increased arrhythmic events, despite animal studies suggesting it was a possibility.

The BSGCT reported that some improvement in & # 39; cardiac movement & # 39; was observed in parts of the patch – but the authors have not attributed this to their technique.

Schumacher has not been seen in public since the head injury while skiing in 2013

Schumacher has not been seen in public since the head injury while skiing in 2013

Schumacher has not been seen in public since the head injury while skiing in 2013

Schumacher poses with the Ferrari 248 during the launch of the new car in January 2006

Schumacher poses with the Ferrari 248 during the launch of the new car in January 2006

Schumacher poses with the Ferrari 248 during the launch of the new car in January 2006

SCHUMACHERS INJURY TIME LINE

December 29, 2013: Schumacher fell and hit his head on a rock while skiing off-piste with son Mick, at Meribel, in the French Alps. Despite wearing a helmet, he suffered a traumatic brain injury and was brought into a medically induced coma.

April 4, 2014: Schumacher's & # 39; s agent reported that he showed "moments of consciousness."

June 16, 2014: Schumacher appeared to have come out of his coma and left a hospital in Grenoble after almost 190 days. He was transferred to a hospital in Switzerland for more care.

September 9, 2014: Schumacher finally got home – 254 days after his bizarre accident. It was said that his return was far ahead of time.

September – December 2016: Schumacher's lawyer, Felix Damm, revealed that the now 50-year-old could not walk. His manager later stated that his health & # 39; no public problem & # 39; and that no comment would be given.

December 2018: Sportsmail reported that although he is slowly making progress, Schumacher is not bedridden or lives on tubes day in day out.

July 2019: Jean Todt, former Ferrari manager, for whom Schumacher once drove, said the driver & # 39; good progress & # 39; and could watch F1 races on TV.

Instead, the team of doctors admitted that the benefits could be due to the coronary artery bypass surgery they had performed.

& # 39; Although the conclusions of this study are modest, it represents an important foot in the door for pluripotent stem cells in therapy, & # 39; wrote the BSGCT.

Schumacher has been recovering at home in Switzerland since he hit Mirabelle and is only visited by close friends who have not revealed any details about his state of health.

Sportsmail reported last December that although it is making slow progress, or not at all, Schumacher is not bedridden or lives on tubes day after day.

He watches F1 races on TV, including with his friend and former Ferrari boss Jean Todt, the FIA ​​president.

Due to the ski accident, he suffered serious head injury and a medically induced coma for several months.

The Schumacher family is right to hide his medical condition, Head Motorsport Ross Brawn has said.

Brawn is one of the few people who visited the affected driver while he is recovering alongside his family in Switzerland.

Brawn, who helped build Schumacher's success with Benetton and Ferrari, and visited the former champion in Switzerland.

& # 39; I am in constant contact with Corinna and fully agree with their decision & # 39 ;, he said.

& # 39; Michael has always been a very private person and that was a guideline in his career, his life and his family always agreed with that choice.

& # 39; It is perfectly understandable that Corinna wanted to maintain the same approach even after the tragic event, and it is a decision that we must all respect.

& # 39; I'm sure the millions of people who are still Michael fans will understand. & # 39;

Schumacher remains the most successful driver in motor sport, with a record of 91 Grand Prix victories. He won his first two titles with Benetton in 1994 and 1995 before five in a row with Ferrari between 2000-2004.

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