Mia Wilkinson suffers from fatal sepsis and becomes a quadruple amputee at four years

Mia Wilkinson became a quadruple amputee after she was killed with deadly sepsis

Mia Wilkinson became a quadruple amputee after she was killed with deadly sepsis

Mia Wilkinson became a quadruple amputee after she was killed with deadly sepsis

Little Mia Wilkinson was like any other bubbly, four-year-old girl who loved swimming, gymnastics, drawing and painting.

But in October of 2017, she went from being a perfectly happy and healthy girl with a contagious smile to a seriously ill person after suffering a septicemia, a life-threatening blood infection caused by bacteria.

Within 48 hours, Mia's heart stopped beating, blood stopped flowing to her hands and feet and she was placed on a vital support for six unbearable days in intensive care.

As her hands and feet began to blacken and wither, the Brisbane girl underwent surgery to amputate her arms and legs.

Her parents, Peter, 40, and Amy, 38, were told to expect the worst, as their seriously ill daughter became attached to her life in the hospital.

But against all odds, the brave girl proved to be a bit of a fighter after fighting the disease, also known as the "silent killer."

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, the family spoke about their ordeal in an attempt to warn other parents about the dangers of the little-known condition that almost claimed the life of Mia, who is now five years old.

Scroll down to watch the video

Before the ordeal, Mia was like any other four-year-old bubbly girl who loved swimming, gymnastics, drawing and painting

Before the ordeal, Mia was like any other four-year-old bubbly girl who loved swimming, gymnastics, drawing and painting

Before the ordeal, Mia was like any other four-year-old bubbly girl who loved swimming, gymnastics, drawing and painting

Peter and Amy with their three children: Ellie, 7, (left) Mia, now 5, (center) and Max, 2 (right)

Peter and Amy with their three children: Ellie, 7, (left) Mia, now 5, (center) and Max, 2 (right)

Peter and Amy with their three children: Ellie, 7, (left) Mia, now 5, (center) and Max, 2 (right)

On the afternoon of Friday, October 13, Mia played with her family like any normal day when she began to complain about her stomach pain.

"We had a normal morning and in the afternoon, she did not feel well, I just picked her up and gave her a hug, and at that moment, she did not look any different, she was normal like any other day," Peter told Daily Mail Australia.

But within hours Mia was vomiting.

Her parents decided to take her to see a family doctor on Saturday morning, where she was diagnosed with a gastrointestinal error after she experienced symptoms similar to the flu.

"We took her back home, she was resting when we noticed she was incoherent, we asked her questions, but she did not look at us or respond," Amy said.

"I told Pete that this does not look good." We have never seen anything like this before in our children, so we thought we would take her to a hospital.

"When we arrived, Mia complained of an intense pain that prevented her from carrying weight on her legs.

"She was diagnosed with Influenza B and viral myositis and sent home to rest."

The four-year-old from Brisbane has been positive during her battle against sepsis

The four-year-old from Brisbane has been positive during her battle against sepsis

The four-year-old from Brisbane has been positive during her battle against sepsis

What is sepsis?

Sepsis, also known as the "silent killer", is a serious infection of the blood caused by bacteria.

It can start with any bacterial infection. That infection can be in the, or in the chest, or even in the skin. But when you have sepsis, the infection gets worse and spreads through the blood. The symptoms of sepsis vary.

They can include:

  • fever
  • cold
  • rapid breathing and heart rate
  • fatigue
  • Headaches

If sepsis worsens, symptoms may include:

  • Confusion
  • nausea and vomiting
  • difficult breathing
  • mottled skin
  • sudden drop in blood pressure

Amy said she stayed in her daughter's room that night, where she had her alarm every hour so she could wake up and control her condition.

"Mia had the flu, so we wanted to monitor her and push her a little to make sure she was still receptive," Amy said.

"The next day, she did not seem better or worse, she was still sick and very lethargic, but nothing had changed.

"We thought that with the flu, Mia just needed to rest."

Amy said she was checking on her daughter all Sunday, until she noticed a "very pale purple rash on her leg" that afternoon.

The family rushed to take Mia to the hospital where she was diagnosed with sepsis.

"Things just intensified from there," Amy recalled.

"We did not know how serious things really were until we got to the hospital." Mia was quickly admitted and surrounded by medical personnel, "we will never forget that scene."

"You feel helpless just standing there."

Peter added: "I remember that she was screaming at us, she was scared while all the medical staff were around her, she wanted to take care of her, but there was no way she could get inside.

The brave girl has been adapting to her new life since she made a remarkable recovery

The brave girl has been adapting to her new life since she made a remarkable recovery

The brave girl has been adapting to her new life since she made a remarkable recovery

Mia has been learning to draw again, and can throw play dough during game time

Now she is adapting to her new life while undergoing constant skin grafting surgery

Now she is adapting to her new life while undergoing constant skin grafting surgery

Now she is adapting to her new life while undergoing constant skin grafting surgery

The parents were told that if they took their daughter to the hospital later, she would probably have died.

As doctors in the emergency department diagnosed sepsis, Mia's body's immune response went into overload in response to Influenza A, Influenza B, Respiratory Syncytial Virus, and an invasive Streptococcal A bacterial infection.

"We clung to the hope that it was not serious," Amy said.

"It was a very strange situation, and when he was given life support, there was a chance he would not survive.

Around midnight, his heart stopped. It was then that we thought we had lost it. I remember seeing the machine pumping back and fourth.

"There was a machine where her lungs would go off, showing that she was trying to breathe on her own."

Surprisingly, Mia miraculously survived.

"It's amazing that she has recovered," Amy said.

"With Mia finally improving, the dose of drugs that constrict their blood vessels was reduced." Blood thinners were introduced to dissolve the clots that had formed.

"The color in Mia's hands and feet improved immediately and we were clinging to the hope that she could lose the tips of her fingers and toes."

After being placed on life support for six days, little Mia miraculously survived

As a result of the paralyzing disease, he became a quadruple amputee after having his arms amputated under his elbows and his legs below his knees.

As a result of the paralyzing disease, he became a quadruple amputee after having his arms amputated under his elbows and his legs below his knees.

As a result of the paralyzing disease, he became a quadruple amputee after having his arms amputated under his elbows and his legs below his knees.

Mia was enjoying a day like any other day last October when she was defeated with sepsis

Mia was enjoying a day like any other day last October when she was defeated with sepsis

Mia was enjoying a day like any other day last October when she was defeated with sepsis

But as a result of the paralyzing disease, he became a quadruple amputee after having his arms amputated under his elbows and his legs below his knees.

"We saw how his legs and hands turned black," Amy recalled.

"As the days passed, his fingers and toes began to dry and wither.

"We told her that she would need to have her hands and feet amputated, and she asked why, and we told her that her hands and feet were sick and they would make her sick again."

Peter added: "She was breathing again and we knew we still had her." It was wonderful, but at the same time, seeing his hands and feet blacken was hard to see.

& # 39; Those were days we will never forget. Mia was on life support for six days. She struggled to return, but a damage was permanent.

Since then Mia has recovered remarkably, and began to learn to walk again on his prosthetic legs.

Now she is adapting to her new life while undergoing constant skin graft surgery and medical check-ups.

"Mia's arms have healed well, and she surprises everyone with her capacity for recovery and adaptability, she has been very brave and is really a source of inspiration," said her parents.

"Her strength and general health have returned and she started school this year." Mia is learning to write with her arms and can feed herself.

& # 39; She is a powerful driver in a wheelchair and is extremely mobile crawling around the house on her elbows and knees.

"Nothing will stop her." We see Mia now living her new life: she has learned to draw, to paint, to play with her dollhouses and to use an iPad ".

By sharing their extraordinary story, the parents hoped that other families could draw hope from their experiences

By sharing their extraordinary story, the parents hoped that other families could draw hope from their experiences

By sharing their extraordinary story, the parents hoped that other families could draw hope from their experiences

Since then, Mia has recovered noticeably and still has a contagious smile that heats hearts everywhere.

By sharing their extraordinary story, the parents hoped that other families could draw hope from their experiences.

"We've never felt emotions as big as this on a large scale: you go from absolute anguish to so much pride for what Mia does now," Amy said.

"We do not remember the traumatic times, looking back and reliving the past is a torture, we try and live in the moment.

"The last 10 months have been filled with anguish and challenges, but Mia is happy and healthy inside her and she's doing extremely well, and that's all that matters."

The family also shared their advice for any parent who may be going through a similar trip.

Do not compare what you have with what you thought you have. Do not look at the past. Look what is good in isolation, "said Peter.

Amy added: Enjoy the time. Do not worry about the future, live the moment. "

The couple has created Movement for Mia to raise awareness about sepsis and to raise funds for Mia's ongoing medical expenses, treatments and prosthetics.

For more information or to make a donation, visit Movement for Mia.

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