MI5 tested Churchill's beloved cigars at MICE to make sure they had not been poisoned by Nazi spies.

Winston Churchill's cigars were tested on mice to ensure they had not been poisoned by Nazi spies, according to war documents.

Winston Churchill's cigars were tested on mice to ensure they had not been poisoned by Nazi spies, documents in wartime revealed.

The prime minister, famous for his smoking habit, often received cigars from supporters while fighting in the war.

This meant that it would be too easy & # 39; for a cigar covered with cyanide or another toxic substance, according to the security services.

Winston Churchill's cigars were tested on mice to ensure they had not been poisoned by Nazi spies, according to war documents.

Winston Churchill's cigars were tested on mice to ensure they had not been poisoned by Nazi spies, according to war documents.

The Prime Minister, famous for his smoking habit, often received cigars from supporters while fighting in the war.

The Prime Minister, famous for his smoking habit, often received cigars from supporters while fighting in the war.

The Prime Minister, famous for his smoking habit, often received cigars from supporters while fighting in the war.

Victor Rothschild, then the head of the anti-sabotage unit of MI5, believed that cigars could have "small explosives". hidden inside them, ready to detonate when Churchill went on.

Robert Hutton, author of the recently published MI5 account, Agent Jack, told the Express: "The safest thing would have been to destroy them all."

"But Churchill was very inclined to consume them, taking," Rothschild observed, "obvious pleasure" for personal danger.

MI5 even feared that an exploding chocolate bar could be among the gifts published on Downing Street.

And when a French Army general presented Churchill with a much-loved ham from Virginia, it was given to a staff member's cat for examination before the Prime Minister was allowed to eat.

Churchill was "delighted" after he was approached and presented the ham while walking through Parliament Square.

Victor Rothschild, then the head of the MI5 sabotage unit, even believed that cigars could have "small explosives" hidden inside them, ready to detonate when Churchill became enlightened

Victor Rothschild, then the head of the MI5 sabotage unit, even believed that cigars could have "small explosives" hidden inside them, ready to detonate when Churchill became enlightened

Churchill, in his was in a paddock, smoking a cigar

Churchill, in his was in a paddock, smoking a cigar

Victor Rothschild, then the head of the MI5 sabotage unit, even believed that cigars could have "small explosives" hidden inside them, ready to detonate when Churchill became enlightened

Churchill was often seen smoking in public, here at the campaign trial in his Woodford constituency the day before the 1955 general election

Churchill was often seen smoking in public, here at the campaign trial in his Woodford constituency the day before the 1955 general election

Churchill was often seen smoking in public, here at the campaign trial in his Woodford constituency the day before the 1955 general election

But it caused "panic" in his protection squad, said Hutton, since they wanted to try the ham before the leader could realize it.

The most important scientific minds in the country decided to feed a cat from a medical researcher.

When the cat survived, Churchill was allowed breakfast.

Winston Churchill giving his famous victory sign on an election tour in Glasgow

Winston Churchill giving his famous victory sign on an election tour in Glasgow

Winston Churchill giving his famous victory sign on an election tour in Glasgow

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