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Men are unhappy when women earn more than they do and a pay rise gives them a ‘psychological kick’

Spouses are unhappy when their wives earn more than themselves and they get a “psychological kick” when a pay rise increases wage superiority within their marriage, research shows.

  • A new study found that the concept of the male breadwinner may still be predominant
  • Men get an ego boost when they get a raise that increases the difference between the woman’s salary
  • Men who earn less than their wives are more likely to report dissatisfaction with life

Men are unhappy when their wives earn more than themselves, and they feel a kick when a pay rise increases wage superiority within their marriage, according to research.

A new study of gender perceptions of income shows that men get a “psychological kick” in their life satisfaction when a salary increase widens the gap between them and their lower-paid wives.

However, it appears to be a ‘male-specific phenomenon’ as women don’t experience the same competitive kick when they get a pay raise.

A new study from City, University of London found that the male breadwinner’s ideal may still be “bigger than we think.” Men who earned less than their wives were more likely to report dissatisfaction with life (stock image)

The study conducted by researchers at City, University of London found that men who earned less than their wives were more likely to report dissatisfaction with their lives (18%).

Men who earned more or as much as their wives were happier and reported more than a third less dissatisfaction with life (11%) than the other group.

Co-author of the study, Vanessa Gash, a sociologist, believes the results show that the male breadwinner’s ideal is still “bigger than we think.”

Denise Coates, 53, pictured, the founder of Bet365, received a salary of £ 323 million last year, making her the highest-earning UK CEO

Denise Coates, 53, pictured, the founder of Bet365, received a salary of £ 323 million last year, making her the highest-earning UK CEO

Denise Coates, 53, pictured, the founder of Bet365, received a salary of £ 323 million last year, making her the highest-earning UK CEO

Speak against The timesDr. Gash said, “Men seem to need the bigger earners in a marriage to feel good about themselves.

‘There is no equal feeling for women, so it is a male-specific phenomenon.’

The study looked at data from the UK household longitudinal study between 2009 and 2017 to examine how the ‘partner pay gap’ affected well-being.

A previous study by Dr. Gash found that the pay gap between partners – the difference in wages between cohabiting partners – has been a constant trend since the mid-1990s.

The study found that the contribution of women to household income from work was between 35 and 45% in heterosexual couples with two earners.

While the number of women earning more than their husbands is still relatively small, it is increasing.

Britain’s highest paid CEO is Denise Coates, 53, the founder of Bet365, who received a salary of £ 323 million last year.

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